Yesha Callahan

Open Thread: Should Mo’Ne Davis Have Forgiven The Baseball Player Who Called Her A ‘Slut’?

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At the young age of 13-years-old, Mo’ne Davis is a bigger person than I could ever be. After being referred to as a ‘slut’ by Bloomsburg University baseball player Joey Casselberry, Davis found it in her heart to forgive him, and even asked for his school to reinstate him as a baseball player.

“Everyone makes mistakes,” Davis said. “Everyone deserves a second chance. I know he didn’t mean it in that type of way. I know people get tired of seeing me on TV. But sometimes you got to think about what you’re doing before you do it.”

“It hurt on my part, but he hurt even more. If it was me, I would want to take that back. I know how hard he’s worked. Why not give him a second chance?”

But unfortunately for Casselberry, the school was like ‘nah’.

“Mo’ne Davis has reached out to Bloomsburg University asking that Joey Casselberry’s dismissal from the team be reconsidered,” the university said in a statement. “Her request demonstrates the type of person she is, her level of maturity and the empathy that her family and coach teach her. Bloomsburg University stands firm on our decision; however, his consequences will be reviewed as is common in disciplinary actions like this.”

Maybe Davis was persuaded to publicly forgive Casselberry, but if it was my child, hell no she wouldn’t have to even think about uttering his name. Even after his sorry ass apology.

Black people, as a collective, are some forgiving ass people. But do we ever get credit for that? No one taught this man how not to call a person a ‘slut’, but we’re taught to turn the other cheek and forgive. We’re taught to take the higher road and forget people’s transgressions against us. But in the words of my grandmother, “F–k that”.

Davis should not have had to forgive Casselberry. She’s a kid, he’s an adult. End of story.

Black people, stop forgiving people. Sometimes it just isn’t worth it. I’m sure Casselberry had even harsher words for Davis, because a tiger never changes its stripes.

Clutchettes, do you think Mo’ne should have forgiven the baseball player?

 Image Credits: Getty Images

  1. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    I share the same sentiment. In regard to Dingleberry, I wouldn’t be surprise if he is calling Davis other disrespectful names now, ever since he was booted from his baseball team.

  2. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    Forgiveness is not natural for many people. However, forgiveness frees both the one who transgressed and the one who was transgressed against. Mo’ne might have continued to harbor her hurt feelings until they caused harm to her, either emotionally or mentally. I think she did the best thing possible for herself. I don’t know that asking for the Joey’s reinstatement was necessary. Nothing makes a point like suffering for one’s own mistakes. It hurts but it serves as a lesson learned.

    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

      @Coil del Rey

      I agree with the forgiveness part. But disagreed with the request of reinstatement part, as well.

    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

      @Coil del Rey

      I think forgiveness is great, but my issue is asking for his reinstatement. I hope the school sticks to its guns. He had no right to say what he did about that child, and he needs to pay for it.

  3. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    i’m pissed at whatever adult convinced her to do this. she should’ve been advised to make no comments. he got what he deserved & at her age, she shouldn’t be required to even participate in this type of thing on a public stage. unfortunately for her, she’ll have many more experiences to prove her theory wrong in the future. that’s how this country functions.

    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

      @Me

      Thank you, I feel the exact same way. A child has no business addressing this–it’s like once again a Black female, no matter how young, is expected to shoulder everyone else’s burdens, smile and apologize for merely existing. I’m like this writer’s grandmother, eff that.

      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

        @vintage3000

        yep. you make a great point about it now taking the focus off that dirtbag & putting unnecessary attention on mo’ne when she has so much else to be proud of. as always the training starts early for a black female child.

  4. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    “I know people get tired of seeing me on TV.”

    I might be wrong for this since I don’t know this kid, but I wonder what type of home environment she has that would allow her to even briefly apologize for her success to defend this filth. And why is her coach speaking for her instead of her parents? The Williams sisters and their father were subjected to much worse than this, and I don’t ever remember reading where they blamed themselves for the hatred they encountered. I know everyone is different and this child is well adjusted, I just don’t get why a 13 YEAR OLD is communicating directly with the university and not her parents or better yet, her attorney.

    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

      @vintage3000

      I have said it several times already, but I am concerned about this child’s handlers. I think too many people see her as a source of income, and not a gifted kid who would benefit from mentoring. If she were my kid, I would encourage her to study hard, and I would keep her involved in the sports that made her famous. Making money is great, and I would let her do a few things, but cashing in should be her priority.

      The push to forgive was surely facilitated by some adult knucklehead who is afraid of upsetting white people.

  5. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    Black people, stop forgiving people. Sometimes it just isn’t worth it. I’m sure Casselberry had even harsher words for Davis, because a tiger never changes its stripes.

    Why do you feel you have the right to tell other black people what to do? You don’t have to forgive anybody. But why are you trying to force your belief on other blacks? Every black person is free to think for themselves. Blacks don’t need white folks or the “talented tenth” telling them how to think or feel.

  6. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    As a matter of principle, I am sick of the pressure that white society puts on African Americans to be meek and forgiving. As a practicing Christian, I think that forgiveness is something that is personal, and should not come as a result of outside pressure. No one has a right to demand or expect forgiveness. More important than forgiveness, is the offender admitting his offense and deciding to do better in the future. That is why I always say that I will take white calls for black forgiveness much more seriously when white people take serious steps to undo institutional racism. Admitting you were wrong sixty or seventy years after your grandfather lynched someone does not cut it, stop the school to prison pipeline that children are caught up as we post, and I will give you your due!

    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

      @Anthony

      Yes, and they try to be slick with ‘if you keep hatred in your heart it destroys all of us” nonsense. Chris Rock made a joke once about how 4th of July is a great holiday only for white americans, and from many of the comments I read online you would have thought he threatened to burn their mothers in a fire. But we are supposed to forgive their intrusions into our lives and the disrespect. And I am glad you mentioned your Christianity, because so many have the misguided belief that being religious means giving people license to walk all over you. My pastor would have been the first person to tell that loser baseball player to go to hell, if it was his child that was insulted.

  7. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    I disagree that we have to help THEM feel better about their mistakes *pout face* I feel like in this instance NO APOLOGY or even response was warranted. He called a GIRL-CHILD slut.

  8. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    I am so glad the college stuck by their decision! This boy needs to understand his hateful words have consequences!

  9. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    We, as black people, have been the masters of forgiveness. We forgive people all of the time. Yet, I will flip the script. Does mainstream society ask the Jewish people to forgive a Nazi war criminal? Does mainstream society ask the Japanese to forgive those who were involved in the Japanese internment during WWII? We know the answer to that question. This double standard involving forgiveness is real. Therefore, forgiveness is very personal and it is up for the victim to decide whether to do it or not. Ultimately, it is Mo’ne Davis’ decision. It is her choice. This situation is never her fault. It is the fault of that male misogynist extremist. Forgiveness should never be utilized as a casus belli (or pretext) to cause that sick male (not man since he’s not a real man) to be reinstated.

    The University should continue to prevent him from being reinstated. This is part of the accountability that reactionaries constantly lecture black people about. The bigger issue is that we have every right to stand up for the human dignity of black people. Mo’ne Davis is a talented person who was slandered by a sick piece of work. We should never tolerate sexist slurs displayed at all. No child should be disrespected like that at all. We have every right to stand up for our people.

    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      Bless you. Can you pass some of that wisdom on to TBB?

      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

        @Jo 'Mama' Besser

        Bless you too.

  10. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    NO! NO! NO!

  11. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    Noirluv make a great point on the original post about this. We are all spending too much time focusing on what Mo’Ne should or should not do, and we are not focusing on the perpetrator.

  12. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    I pray that her mindset stems from her affirmation that 1) the word in no way applies to her and 2) Dingleberry is an immature, ignorant, poor excuse for a man.

    Forgiving frees us from the hold those who aggrieve us have on us. I commend Mon’Ne for forgiving that loser-she’s a bigger person than I. However, I agree that he should not be reinstated. Sure, it probably won’t change Dingleberry’s toxicity and clear hatred for women, but at least he can think about the consequences of his words-from the bench, and I hope it jeopardizes any possibility of him going pro.

  13. March 25, 2015 - Reply

    no

  14. March 25, 2015 - Reply

    Shame on her parents, and her coach. Accept a racists apology? For what reason? He should have been an after thought. Black people forgive racism more than any other race.

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