Yesha Callahan

So Ayesha Curry Likes To Cover Up For Her Man, Why Are Y’all Mad?

TJMaxx/Instagram/Twitter

TJMaxx/Instagram/Twitter

Twitter was on fire before anyone even had their morning coffee Sunday when feminists woke up to tweets from one half of America’s favorite basketball couple that very much rubbed them the wrong way.

It only took four tweets for Ayesha Curry to trend for the better part of the Lord’s day, ironically for opinion likely rooted in her Christian beliefs, but that many dismissed as sexist patriarchy.

Ayesha certainly isn’t the first person to suggest women could leave a little more to the imagination, but in these hyper-feminist times no one was here for anything she had to say. Especially when women like Amber Rose are walking around half-naked in the name of slut walks and womens’ right to dress and behave however they want and still be respected.

https://twitter.com/BrandonEvrs/status/673591290370527232

https://twitter.com/tmhtesfaye/status/673575470873616387

While I can agree the whole classy over trendy remark was rather judgmental and unnecessary, the thing is, Ayesha wasn’t trying to start a cover-up movement. She didn’t even pull a Keri Hilson “If more girls were willing to be ladies, more guys would feel challenged to be gentlemen” move that subsequently got the singer dragged on twitter and IG. All Ayesha said is what she likes to do with her body and in her marriage. It’s everyone else who read into her comments as something more than a clothing preference and even tried to hold her responsible for the way men treat and look at women who dress a certain way ,which is more problematic than anything she had to say. Men need to take responsibility for their own actions and thoughts, point blank period. Besides, given the fact that Ayesha and Stephen are die-hard Christians, why is anyone surprised, let alone mad? Just in the way she said y’all can keep rocking the latest trends, she can stay turtleneck fresh. As long as women are doing and wearing what they want (not what a man wants or says he wants) and not being treated any differently for it, there’s no harm and no foul.

  1. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    Ayesha ain’t obligated to cater to these sensitive people.If you are so secure with how you carry yourself then it shouldn’t matter.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @_a_

      Who cares how SHE likes to dress for her soft man?

      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

        @TivoliEclipse

        Hey her man is kind of cute tho.

        • December 8, 2015 - Reply

          @Mrs.J

          Yes he is lol. Together they make an adorable couple and family.

          • December 8, 2015 - Reply

            @Mico

            They do and they all look alike.

      • December 8, 2015 - Reply

        @TivoliEclipse

        why is he soft oh because he is clean cut, well spoken, not quick to anger, respectful, a good proud husband and father, smart, intelligent and well raised? oh that makes him soft right.

  2. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    “Ayesha certainly isn’t the first person to suggest women could leave a little more to the imagination”

    But she never suggested anything to anyone. She mentioned what SHE does with HER body and folks took it as a personal affront. Projecting their own guilt/condemnation on the woman then working themselves into a fit because she chooses not to follow the current trend.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @Me

      Yup! My thoughts exactly, Me.

  3. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    so…people are butt hurt because she advised keeping your damn clothes on and doesn’t agree with showing your whole ass to random folk? seriously?! smfh

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @Sher

      very good point and spot on however that’s where we are at right now and unfortunately they got the grip but praise Ms. Curry.

  4. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    thats what im talking about…its nice to see a woman that want to dress modestly and follow her own lead. i like that.

  5. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    People are always saying that racism doesn’t need intent, and the same could be applied here. However “accidental” it was, Ayesha fired a shot into the dark, and then tried to play dumb (if she’s playing) and act surprised at people returning fire. You can’t admit that what she said about classy vs trendy was “judgmental and unnecessary” and then wonder why people are judging her in return. It seems to me that the ones writing these “Why you mad?” “hit dogs holler” think-pieces and using her remarks and image in all sorts of memes “hoe’s tears” to degrade other women are going much harder than her critics.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @uhoh-ohno

      BOOM! I don’t have a problem of what she said nor do I think it should be taken as an offense on the surface but I don’t like a lot of the spin-offs thoughts/articles/memes and nasty undertones it has created regarding women in general. This is the same wash, rinse and repeat of “women need to do, act or be x,y and z and if you are not then you are 1,2, and 3.”

      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

        @binks

        I feel you Sister.

        Ayesha Curry gave her views. I don’t view her words as condescending. First, it must be established that there is nothing wrong with a woman wearing modest clothing. Women can wear a diversity of clothing. We shouldn’t be a society that puts a stigma on women who wear more conservative clothing. This is her clothing and her body. Likewise, on the other side of the coin, we should not paint a broad brush among women who wear more revealing clothing. Not all people who wear more revealing clothing are reckless, sexually promiscuous without concern for protection, or someone who wants to degrade other people. Ayesha’s comments represent an important debate. I have no issues with what she Tweeted as she has the free speech right to express herself. Her marriage is her marriage and she has the right to cover herself up with clothing in public if she desires to. It’s not that deep. I don’t believe that she or Ayesha should be disrespected. People have the right to agree or disagree with her views.

        I want a progressive society where women can be free to express their views and wear their clothing and hair in a diversity of ways. I don’t believe in a theocracy and neither do I believe that Ayesha’s views should be shammed as some have done. There is not need to express misogyny or misogynoir at all too. We can have a civil discourse in the world without pettiness. Likewise, I don’t believe that women should be guilt tripped into wearing certain clothing to please white supremacist patriarchal sentiment. Women should wear clothing, because of their voluntary decisions.

        • December 7, 2015 - Reply

          @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

          Beautifully stated Truth!

          • December 7, 2015 - Reply

            @binks

            Thank you Sister.

            Your words have a great eloquence too.

            • December 8, 2015 - Reply

              @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

              I always appreciate your wisdom and positivity, truth.

              • December 8, 2015 - Reply

                @lynn1066

                Thank you Sister. You and others here inspire me to continue to outline eloquent wisdom and great truth.

  6. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    So, I guess now the new definition of a feminist is one who is not free to express, or even form opinions about women (dress, sexual activity, etc.), and who walks the streets half naked, having sex with anything on two legs as frequently as possible because, dammit, “men do it too”? Because that’s what I’m noticing more often these days. And its like a slap in the face to all the feminists who fought (and still fight) for us to have a voice, be respected in the workplace, to be protected against violence under the law, and to actually have REAL rights and equality. So many women would rather nit-pick about having the “right” to be half dressed in public and sexually promiscuous than address more important women’s issues. Her opinion is hers. If she thinks it shows no class to dress scantily then that’s her opinion. I think it’s trashy when men (grown and young men) wear their pants down showing their entire a**. Not a gender thing, just my opinion of how people dress. No one can have an opinion about women anymore though….or else get called out for “slut-shaming”. Give me a break.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @Qris_10

      If I could give you many thumbs up, I would.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @Qris_10

      “Her opinion is hers. If she thinks it shows no class to dress scantily then that’s her opinion. I think it’s trashy when men (grown and young men) wear their pants down showing their entire a**. Not a gender thing, just my opinion of how people dress.” I think it shows no class for women to dress scantily AND I ALSO THINKS IT’S TRASHY FOR MEN TO WEAR THEIR PANTS DOWN BELOW THERE BEHIND and it’s not a gender thing, what she said and do got nothing at all to do with feminism for she operates in the nature god created her not what some professor trained her or told her how she suppose to think and dress to prove she is a strong women see she didn’t have to learn this from a book. Thumb up for you and praise her cause right now the world need many many more like her.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @Qris_10

      Amber Rose is the prime example of what you have stated. Why I don’t support her for what she stands for. It’s pseudo-feminism.

  7. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    People want to feel good about what they do. Ayesha’s comments upset some women’s sensibilities. I have no problem with what she said. No one deserves to be shamed, but I don’t see her statements as shaming women. The word, “classy,” seems to be the hot spot. If a woman is comfortable with revealing dress, then do so, but don’t get upset when someone else chooses not to do the same or they express other views. I don’t believe in shaming anyone, unless they are miscreants; however, people will always have their standards and it may not be what people want to hear. That’s life, and it will never change. Many of us want to fix the world. That’s not a bad thing, but maybe we should pick our battles a little more carefully. Mrs. Curry spoke her truth and some were salty. That’s not her problem.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @Noirluv45

      “No one deserves to be shamed,” respectfully some do need to be shamed it will keep them from destroying themselves, shame is a good thing it helps keep one in line those who do have shame is a train wreak wait to happen. praise women like Ayesha Curry we need many many more like her to stand up and speak out and be a voice of reason for wholesome and decency moral up right dress conduct and behavior and be a role model for our impressionable young ladies.

      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        People should be learning morals from their parents or role models in their lives.

        • December 7, 2015 - Reply

          @Mrs.J

          I agree!

          • December 7, 2015 - Reply

            @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

            People were also saying the same thing on some other sight.They were like we need more women to speak up so that these young girls won’t dress half naked.I’m like that’s the problem right there.Kids shouldn’t be looking up to people in the entertainment industry as role models.They should be looking up to their parents or other people close to them that are descent role models.

            • December 7, 2015 - Reply

              @Mrs.J

              you are right and I completely agree with you on that but the problem is so many children boys and girls parents are not good role models so they look to others as role models.

              • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                That’s true also.I wish they would look up to a teacher or a family member instead of famous people though.

                • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                  @Mrs.J

                  Me too I agree!

      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        Trueletterson, it’s not up to you or me to teach grown people how to dress. Like Mrs. J said, morality starts at home. There are things I disagree with such as showing off my body, but for those women who do, they are grown and have every right to do so. All I’m saying is that parents need to teach their children morality and how to carry themselves in public and in private. When they grow up, they’ll decide for themselves that that definition means. My mother told me, “Always carry yourself like a lady because being a lady never goes out of style.” One aspect of being a lady, TO ME, means dressing, not like a nun, but not revealing either. That definition obviously doesn’t apply to others.

        • December 7, 2015 - Reply

          @Noirluv45

          I agree with you and Mrs.J morality starts at home however a very large percentage of our young girls and boys live in dysfunctional homes where the parents are just as immature as the children so they look to others as role models, just as those women who show off their body got the right to do so, so does Ayesha Curry and other modishly dress ladies have the RIGHT to their opinion on dress and I prefer Ayesha Curry and I support her right to do so. Peace. Good and morally up right people got rights too.

          • December 7, 2015 - Reply

            @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

            I agree with you. In fact, I was talking to a friend the other day. Her cousin became a grandmother at 30. It’s like there aren’t many “Big Mamas” anymore. When I was growing up, the whole neighborhood was involved in watching over the children. We had a village back then, but now…not so much.

            • December 7, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              you are right and they think that’s normal, in many homes the household is so dysfunctional that the roles of parents and children have been reversed and there in lies the root of most of our problems.

  8. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    Ayesha’s comments weren’t bad (she just expressed her personal standards), and neither were the tweets in reaction to her comments. Seems like much ado about nothing.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @PurpNGold1

      Thank you!!! But you know our people. Always beating dead horses

  9. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    I missed the brouhaha yesterday but I am one to frequently advocate modesty and a little mystery, these things are not old fashioned and will never play out esp in a time when too many feel like less, as in the amount of clothing/coverage, is more, when in all actuality it reeks of desperation and low self esteem.

  10. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    Who is y’all. Stop being such a troll clutch. Everyone loves Ayesha….funny thing is I didn’t see anyone who was mad. All I saw where loud ass black men (and some women) going on and on about how everyone was mad but the people who were actually mad?? Umm barely any. This is a non story.

  11. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    Literally nothing wrong with dressing modestly, and def nothing wrong with voicing that that’s your personal preference. Tbh the biggest issue with her comment was the classy vs. trendy remark which DOES feed into the ho/good girl dichotomy and yes, sounded condescending.

    The far bigger issue overall was the number of men who then appeared from the damn rafters and took this as an opportunity to attack any and all women who don’t fit their idea of feminine perfection. To Ayesha’s credit though, she took to twitter again to say that her comments should not be used as fuel to further demean women.

  12. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    women can generally benefit from choosing modesty while in public, She still dresses great, she just choses to only show her husband the private parts of her body. .. why is it a problem to see her preference as a problem….

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @jess-s

      they want to see women like her sabotage herself, her husband and her marriage, then they will be happy and say good girl she was a strong black women then they would be happy.

      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        Please tell me you’re not serious?

        • December 7, 2015 - Reply

          @Raze

          I think that person is the Burning bush lol.

        • December 7, 2015 - Reply

          @Raze

          I am dead serious, serious as a heart attack!

  13. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    Her comments didn’t affect me at all but I can see where people think she’s slamming women who dress a certain way.

  14. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    Praise her, love her, adore her, admire her, elevate her, bow down and honor her for she is a lady who is please and happy operating in the nature god created her.

  15. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    I think this is a combination of shade and projection. I don’t think her post was as innocent as she wants us to think. But at the same time I think people turned this anthill into a mountain. But my thoughts regarding this whole thing, first who is “everyone” she is mentioning? Newsflash most women dress modestly/covered up DAILY (furthermore you can dress modest AND trendy these two things aren’t mutually exclusive) so I am going to need her and everyone else to stop thinking they are this unique snowflake that is “oh so different” from everyone else when technically you are not. Secondly, whether people want to acknowledge it or not but her tweets did create a crap-fest of putting other women down that was filled with misogyny and misogynoir. I seen a lot of comments of people, both men and women, calling other women thots, b*tches, hoes, etc. because they didn’t agree with her opinion insinuating they are “bad good time only” women which is problematic. Thirdly, I am sick and tired of the Madonna/Whore complex that people buy into because both are two extreme of womanhood. There are a million landing points between 1 and 2 so we don’t have to held in such a rigid position of either or. Lastly, the way you dress solely doesn’t dictate someone values. You can be covered up and be the devil in the flesh and you can be trendy and be on your way to sainthood. At the end of the day be comfortable in your skin, choices and nobody’s opinion should make you jump if you are sure within yourself. In addition, the thing about “class” or “being classy” is you don’t have to voice it.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @binks

      People are definitely making a mountain out of a molehill. She referenced no one and most certainly no race. Her opinion. Also, those twitter fingers (and most of us, tbh) are the first to slag the K family for their nudity and what not stating that they’re bad role models to young girls. Is this the new ‘feminism’ where only one opinion is allowed?

      She mentioned current trends and frankly, I get what she means. I’m under 35 but when I see teen girls these days, I clutch my figurative pearls and wonder if their mothers saw them in the morning. It’s worse in summer as they feel it’s a license to prove that they were born with XX chromosomes. Same goes for grown women that you would think should know better.

      She’s just voicing what we really all think with current ‘barely there’ fashion trends but only discuss with real humans and not online where we will be drawn and quartered…like is happening to her now.

      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

        @AfroCapricornette

        I disagree, she is voicing what SHE thinks and some people happens to agree. And the thing is “the barely there fashion trends” and pushing the envelope in terms of fashion has been happening for years so she isn’t stating anything new or radical in thought. Sure we may clutch our pearls at the generation today style, but our mothers were clutching their pearls at us, our grandmothers to our mothers, and so on. Would I wear what some of the items that are “trendy”? No but I on’t demean other woman who choose too. Hell, I LOVE Rihanna style most of the time but wouldn’t wear it but people deem her as not modest and naked. My thing with this whole situation is that we can bring awareness dressing modesty without the group think of flogging women, policing women or devaluing them based on clothes, particularly those who happen not to fit or like the “classy/covered up” mold. Furthermore, I don’t think clothes and being nude makes or break who is a role model. I don’t the K family is a role model for plenty of reasons and not of those reasons have to do with the way they dress. But you are right that feminism has to make room for ALL voices and allowed disagreement because that is how we grow. So, I don’t mind or disagree with Mrs. Curry on the surface but again the undertone of where her tweets went is problematic.

        • December 7, 2015 - Reply

          @binks

          Let’s be honest here. We all know people will seek offense anywhere. Even if the word ‘classy’ had not been mentioned, they would still have said she slut-shamed. How can dressing modestly be addressed without ‘offending’ those who will be? Even school districts that implement dress codes for all students are ridiculed by students and adults alike!

          Whether we like to admit it or not, dressing is one of the many ways we (society) use to assess each other and unfortunately, women are judged harshly by their dressing (a conversation for another time).

          It was meant to be light-hearted but of course, twitter fingers at work. Smh.

          • December 7, 2015 - Reply

            @AfroCapricornette

            Unfortunately I agree, we still judge people on there clothes and place value on them, particularly women, by how they present themselves which is wrong and problematic. But I disagree that the discussion of women being judged harshly by their dressing is a conversation for another time because whether she realized it or not her tweets coincide with this issue especially when she used “everyone dress…” who is the everyone because most women dress modest she isn’t in a small percentage of women that choose to dress modestly, nor do I think these tweets was meant to be lighthearted. I think this was combination of shade going wrong and not expecting people to run with it by turning these tweets into something bigger than what it should have been. But at this point, this topic is beyond done where everyone should be able to agree to disagree respectfully.

            • December 8, 2015 - Reply

              @binks

              And that’s the main issue here. People (women) were not disagreeing respectfully. Men on the other hand, resorted to vitriol and insults on the women who disagreed. It was like needed an excuse to go off on women. Smh. The childishness on Twitter from both sides was just disheartening.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @binks

      You said it all. It’s interesting too because the dress and top she’s wearing up top are extra cute to me and do follow the ‘rules’ of not revealing both lower body and cleavage. However, to many people what she is wearing would be considered revealing and showing too much skin.

      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

        @Mico

        The white outfit?

        • December 7, 2015 - Reply

          @Mrs.J

          I like both of them lol.

          • December 7, 2015 - Reply

            @Mico

            I was like people are going to call her out because that white outfit was kind of short lol.I could careless.I just didn’t appreciate how men and some women were saying women who dress a certain way are h o e s.The comments were on Ayesha’s Twitter.I read some of them.

            • December 7, 2015 - Reply

              @Mrs.J

              I agree with you.

              • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                I think people did call her out on that.I don’t have a Twitter,Facebook or anything.It’s all too much.

                • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                  @Mrs.J

                  We live in a new generation. There is an over saturation of social media and technology to put it lightly. LOL. People can have a reasonable debate without coming for her or Ayesha personally. Just because a woman dresses in a certain way doesn’t mean that she should be called out of her name either.

                  • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                    @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                    Right.That’s why I don’t do social media at all though.People always have something to say.I just come on these blogs but that’s getting old too.

                    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                      @Mrs.J

                      You have every right not to go on social media. At the end of the day, we want society to improve excluding distractions.

                      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                        Thanx.I believe most of it is used for foolery lol.No some of it is used in a good way but it’s not for me.

                        • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                          @Mrs.J

                          OK. LOL. You’re honest.

            • December 7, 2015 - Reply

              @Mrs.J

              Exactly….that isn’t right. Women should not be called names based upon what they choose to wear. The whole argument about women’s clothing is hilarious as baggy, nonrevealing, and/or conservative clothing has never stopped a woman from being approached, involved in sexual activities, catcalled, or raped. Shaming women for what they wear is only used by men/society to blame women for their own mistreatment, especially when it comes to rape. And like others have said it puts those who choose to dress more conservatively on a pedastal. Women shouldn’t be shamed for dressing conservatively, and they also shouldn’t be shamed for showing skin either.

              • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                @Mico

                I totally agree.Some of the comments were just horrible.

              • December 7, 2015 - Reply

                @Mico

                I totally agree with you.

                Human autonomy means human autonomy. Regardless of how a woman wears her own clothing, she should be treated as a total human being. Regardless if a woman wears more conservative clothing or not, she should never be shamed. Sick people who abuse the rights of women don’t do it, because of how a woman wears her clothing. Sick people do it, because these people are just plain evil and want control over human beings. A woman wearing a hajib (I intentionally used this example to expose the words of a GOP fascist who slanders Muslims daily) has equal value to a woman wearing more revealing clothing.

      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

        @Mico

        I agree Mico. I was reading a post on another site and someone was posting outfits she wore that wouldn’t be considered modest/covered up but in fact “trendy”…side eye….in addition to the white outfit posted above. So sadly, she would be a victim to her own standards by some people. So it goes to show that nobody is safe in this situation but as the saying goes watch out throwing rocks because someone could throw the same rock back at you.

        • December 7, 2015 - Reply

          @binks

          Exactly. And it’s a shame because these ‘rules’ of dress are often subjective and can be very restrictive. Especially when you consider that many women across the globe are often forced to cover their bodies due to culture and religious practices.

  16. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    She is not obligated to mince her words for everyone. If you like to cover yourself up…fine. If you want to walk around half dressed that fine too. We are all adults and make our own choices.

    If you get butt hurt about someone making a statement about what they personally like to do, you have way too much time on your hand. Go outside and play.

    People want to talk about slut shamming. They are doing the same thing. I guess you call it modest-shamming. How about we stop attacking people for their personal choices. A individual’s outfit doesn’t bother me. If you walk around in public dang near naked, that’s your business. I don’t have to look or be around it. I can easily remove myself from it.

    We as a have turned into finger pointing society. Oooooo look! She does have clothes on! I don’t like that. Omg look at that! He’s/She’s dating another woman/man! I don’t like that. Holy crap! She has all of her clothes on! What a weirdo! Will you look at that! That mother/father had the nerve to discipline their kid/s. Why would they do that? That’s not how I would have handled that! Get a grip people. Put you finger down and point at yourself.

    Let’s get back to the point…Leave this lady alone. She like to dress a specific way because she likes it and her man likes it as well. End of story.

  17. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    Twitter is full of unsolicited opinions. If you don’t like what someone has to say, there is an unfollow button. People these days.

  18. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    *Unpopular Black Opinion Alert*

    Her opinion was unsolicited, offered no measurable context, and was marketed in such a way that it held “slut-shaming” undertones. “Throwing Shade 101” taught us how to properly use irony punctuation and the laughing/tears of joy emoji in order to underscore your point.

    Her statement (and others that resulted in support) failed to factor in the living environment/behaviors that some women who are deemed “loose” or promiscuous have endured such as rape, sexual assault, addiction, physical abuse. Everyone seemed to infer their opinion based on that one “hoe” that swerved them at the club or made their crush bae that no one was checking the respectability politics and misogyny that crept in the back door.

    Not to mention, many supporters of her tweet conveniently overlooked all of the “YASS” passes that the likes of Beyoncé/Rihanna/Nicki Minaj receive all under the guise of entertainment for how they dress. For the sake of fairness, let’s also include strip club worship and any bitch/hoe references in songs or videos from Drake, Chris Brown, or any other popular male rapper.

    Sadly, the most important thing that it showed is that if you EVER dare to offer an opinion contrary to the norm within the Black community, some men & women will be the first to remind you just how much of a whore/hoe/slut/bitch/thot/ratchet you are. Also, be prepared to have your educational attainment, financial background, marital status, skin complexion, physical attractiveness, and hair type dragged to filth. Just making sure, the Black community’s most pressing issues stem only from White people and law enforcement?

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @amtubbs8

      Interesting perspective.

    • December 7, 2015 - Reply

      @amtubbs8

      Oh and can we add the men who is co-signing these tweets by letting their misogyny fly are usually the MAIN ones trying to direct message, like, put the women on the pedestal by saying “bae or goals” are the opposite of these tweets…side eye. We can make a list of Instagram popular women that men drool over and lust over they are not the picture of modesty.

      • December 7, 2015 - Reply

        @binks

        Teach.

        The system of patriarchy condemns women in a vicious way based on a clothing that a woman’s wear. We should be judged by the content of our character alone.

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @amtubbs8

      And it’s like, who is she to even be throwing such shade? Her notoriety has nothing to do with her and everything to do with her husband. She doesn’t even have any fancy degrees. She’s not Hillary Clinton.This aint no Michelle Obama set up where she’s bread-winning so her man can pursue politics. If you’re little more than a failed actress, who wants to pop off as a would-be Martha Stewart, you should think twice before trying to front like your a cut above the “Draya’s” of the world, especially when the world will cease to pay attention to you if Steph can’t play or divorces you. Hell, even Martha Stewart had a successful catering business and a degree before she became a TV star. The only thing that qualifies Ayesha to be some sort of Cooking- Suzy homemaker guru is being married to Steph. Girl, bye. This whole fracas has soured me on her.

  19. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    Because the byotch thinks her opinion is relevant.

  20. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    I have to agree her on this one.

  21. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    People need to leave Ayesha alone. Not everyone finds looking like skanky Amber rose worshipper appealing. She knows how to look good and classy. Many women should take notes.

  22. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    Pretty sure it wasn’t what she said but it was the condescending tone and the subsequent barrage of tweets from dusty Negros and “pick me I’m different” b!tches who used the tweet as an excuse to call women they didn’t deem respectable “hoes”.

  23. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    It reminds me of when people lambasted Russell Wilson for saying he and Ciara were practicing abstinence when he was asked about it. It was just TOO much for people to handle. Yet nobody really has an issue with rappers and singers talking about “surfboards”, f***ing women whilst wearing gucci flip flops, beating it up all night, etc. But let someone talk about how they practice a modest lifestyle and people get up in arms as if it’s an attack on them. Tuh…

  24. December 7, 2015 - Reply

    She’s entitled to her opinions let her live.

  25. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    A hit dog will holler…that is all. Ayesha wants to cover up except for her man and these fools are mad but…if she was out here with her whole ass on display for the world, they’d call her all kinds of hoes. stop it already. reality tv and TMX have people thinking too far up their own behinds.

  26. December 12, 2015 - Reply

    I don’t see anything wrong with what she said. All I’ve been seeing on tumblr this past week is women upset at her saying that she is “slut shaming”….I don’t see any slut shaming what so ever in her tweets. It seems her words hit a nerve with those that complained because they obviously feel guilty about how they act/dress. If you’re so confident with how you dress/who you are, why do her comments bother you?

  27. December 12, 2015 - Reply

    FOR THOSE WHO DON’T KNOW. HERE ARE SOME RULES TO FEMINISM SO YOU CAN STOP BEING DISRESPECTFUL:

    A Woman can dress as she pleases and say what she pleases (Unless it disagrees in any way shape or form with feminism, or if it seems like it’d be bad for women at any moment of time…… or if someone else decides they dislike what she’s doing/saying)

    Women can FUCK whoever they want. (Unless they’re drunk, then they have no responsibility whatsoever at all, kind of like children)

    Rape is WRONG. (False rape claims however are not. Men, regardless of whether or not they are rapists, are rapists, and most of anything is rape.)

    Women of all shapes and sizes are beautiful. (Feminists will force this down your throat kind of like a -trigger warning-: cock)

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