Yesha Callahan

White People Upset Over Mo’ne Davis Biopic & College Baseball Player Dropped From Team After Offensive Tweet

Screen Shot 2015-03-23 at 10.32.04 AM

Haters gonna hate. And that’s exactly what people did when it was announced on Friday that the Disney Channel was developing a Mo’ne Davis biopic. The famous Little Leaguer’s life will come to the small screen sometime next year, but it got a lot of folks riled up.

https://twitter.com/KCSportDisaster/status/579140712370851840

https://twitter.com/Co_Justin34/status/579133302205870080

And then there’s Bloomsburg University baseball player Joey Casselberry. Casselberry went all the way left when he complained about the Davis biopic.

cass2

The university’s athletic department announced Casselberry’s dismissal from the team in a tweet Saturday, insisting that Casselberry’s tweet did not represent the views of the school.

I guess Casselberry now wishes he could ‘Throw Like Mo’.

Image Credits: Getty Images

  1. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    Haters gonna hate.

  2. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    Do they not get that this is a young teenage girl?

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @Brad

      Brad, I don’t think these demons care what age she is. All they have to do is not watch the show, but instead, they open their big, fat mouths talking mess. It seems as if when Black are on the come up and outshine them, they get salty. Sick, sick, sick.

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @noirluv45

        I certainly hope that the Bloomsburg University baseball player is not the only one held accountable.

        This is exactly why I had the conversation with my youngest about not speaking negative about your black female peers. Because their is more than enough people attacking you already.

        • March 23, 2015 - Reply

          @Brad

          Agreed, Brad.

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @noirluv45

        These white racist individuals don’t surprise me one bit.

        The haters will hate and black folks will shine regardless.

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @noirluv45

        You’re so right. I was on FB this morning reading this black history post about a black man (last name Russell) invented the 3G and 4G technology that is used today. Well the post was on Cut N Edge’s FB page. He likes to promote the uplifting of the black community. The majority of his followers are black but guess who were the main ones that were salty about this post? People that were never on his page before but now here they come? The non blacks. “What difference does it make if he was black?” “I don’t see color…” “Slavery was over 150 years ago and you people keep bringing it up…”

        This young girl is minding her own business being her fabulous self and some grown white MEN are calling her a SLUT???

        Just like the Jackie Robinson team that got their title stripped because they “cheated” (some of the players lived in a different zip code). I’m betting that it was one of the losing teams that took an effort to research and snitch.

        • March 23, 2015 - Reply

          @paintgurl40

          paintgurl, oh yes! LOL! You know, we can’t expect dogs not to bark or for leopards to change their spots. Whenever they are confronted with the truth that doesn’t pay support their “superiority,” they want to play the, “What difference does color make, blah, blah, blah.” They are so predictable.

          I know. They just can’t leave people be. They are so obsessed with us or maybe they are shills purposely trying to start an uproar. Whatever the case, he got his behind sat down, and he does not deserve reinstatement.

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @Brad

      These vicious cowards don’t care. We all feel outrage at how an innocent Sister has been slandered by a sick male (not man).

  3. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    I simply can’t get passed an adult male calling a 13 year old girl a slut. This could mean so man different things and they are all sick.

  4. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    On the positive side, Curt Schilling, a former big leager and Tea Party supporter, has been a vocal supporter of Mo’ ne Davis and the punishment for that idiot college player because there were similar tweets posted about his daughter when he congratulated her on earning a softball scholarship. No doubt, there is racism involved in these nasty tweets, but do not underestimate the sexism on the part of men who do not respect female athletes, and who also reflexively sexualize all comments about women and girls, no matter the context.

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @Anthony

      Good for him because this cyber bullying has gotten so bad and so out of hand at this point.

      I think you are right on the mark with the sexism to.

  5. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    Apparently Mo’ne and her coach asked the school to reinstate the player (the school refused). I understand wanting to be the bigger person but some adult in her life should’ve advised her to let him hang on his own rope. Why do people always seem so surprised that things said on social media have real world consequences?

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @PurpNGold1

      Somebody needs to slap Mo’ ne’s coach! That jackass baseball player deserves no compassion. He was a grown man publicly calling a middle school girls slut in public with his name and face connected to the Tweet. He was being totally disrespectful, and needs to suffer for being an asshole.

      I have said it before, and I mean it: I will be all about forgiveness for racists the day black folks stop getting arrested and sent to prison any and every bullcrap infraction. The same goes for black kids always being suspended and expelled for any and everything too. If forgiveness is so wonderful, white folks need to try it, instead of just recommending it black people.

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @Anthony

        Waiting to forgive others until people do the right thing defeats the whole purpose of forgiveness.

        • March 23, 2015 - Reply

          @mbeezy

          Bullshit.

          • March 24, 2015 - Reply

            @vintage3000

            That philosophy you call “bullshit” was used to help African-Americans obtain rights in this country.

            • March 24, 2015 - Reply

              @Objection

              Black people obtained rights because they boycotted, marched and protested. They made themselves an economical, social and political nuisance that white people couldn’t continue to ignore. It wasn’t successful because black people stood around and told whites they forgive them for everything they’ve done. It wasn’t successful because black people acted like doormats. Ya’ll need to stop painting the Civil Rights as some passively peaceful movement. Black
              people were actively defiant, actively resistant, actively burdensome. Forgiveness was not their strategy.

              • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                @RettCall

                Black people obtained rights because they boycotted, marched and protested.

                You need to reread what I said. I said the philosophy was used to help African-Americans obtain rights in this country. I never said it was the only method used. No mater how hard you try, MLK used love and forgiveness as a method to help African-Americans obtain rights.

                No one is forcing you to forgive anyone. But let other African-Americans handle things their way. Its their life.

                • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                  @Objection

                  Love and forgiveness does not and will not change the evil heart of a racist. They killed him, Objection!

                  Again, you are focusing on what we did. The Civil Right’s Movement was about us. We knew we had the right to eat where we wanted or to vote. They didn’t know, so you are basically saying we have the responsibility to change the hearts of man by love and forgiveness, and they have the right to continue to dehumanize others.

                  If you want to forgive, join hands and sing, “We Are the World,” then, fine.

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @noirluv45

                    Also, forgiveness never deals with the exoneration of evil or the omission of accountability at all. There must be justice in the world and there is no true love without the opposition to evil and the fight against injustice.

                    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                      YES!!!!!

                      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                        @noirluv45

                        I will be back in a few hours. Enjoy your day Sister. 🙂

                        • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                          @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                          OK, truth! You do the same!

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @noirluv45

                    Love and forgiveness does not and will not change the evil heart of a racist. They killed him, Objection!

                    Yes he was killed. But your statement that love does not change hate is wrong. I will agree to disagree with you.

                    Again, you are focusing on what we did. The Civil Right’s Movement was about us. We knew we had the right to eat where we wanted or to vote. They didn’t know, so you are basically saying we have the responsibility to change the hearts of man by love and forgiveness, and they have the right to continue to dehumanize others.

                    I never said this. I said that forgiveness was used to help African-Americans obtain rights. You speak as if I’m trying to force you to forgive people. I’m not. You are free not to forgive anyone.

                    If you want to forgive, join hands and sing, “We Are the World,” then, fine.

                    LOL, I do my best to forgive people. Sometimes its hard. You know what is funny, the people I had to forgive were black.

                • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                  @Objection

                  And I’m saying it wasn’t. Martin Luther preached love and
                  forgiveness because it was good for black people’s soul,
                  spirit and motivation not to be become bitter and resentful. It was not about changing what lies in white people’s hearts, but healing black people’s souls. More importantly, MLK was one man in the movement, his words did not speak to everyone nor did he demand black people roll over and play nice with whites in the hopes that we can love white people into loving us.

                  What actually affected change was the actions undertaken, the marches, the protests, the sit-ins, the political, social and economical ramifications of black people coming together to demand better. Forgiveness comes after all of that, to facilitate the healing, but it’s not the strategy.

                  Black people are probably the most forgiving people on earth when it comes to whites. But at some point the amount of things we’re willing to forgive stops speaking to our character and starts speaking to some lack of basic human survival instincts to protect and defend ourselves. You can be too forgiving, too accepting, too permissive of the people who treat you as less than them.

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @RettCall

                    And I’m saying it wasn’t.

                    You and I can agree to disagree on MLK’s philosophy. I never once told African-Americans they had to forgive anyone. I just don’t think the concept is “bullshit.” Feel free to do as you please.

                    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                      @Objection

                      There’s nothing to “agree to disagree” on. MLK’s philosophy, and the philosophy of the Civil Rights movement, simply wasn’t blanket forgiveness. To suggest so is to twist the work and legacy of the people who came before us into something that is less threatening and easier to swallow. It’s exactly that kind of thinking that leads to white people quoting MLK at black people every time they do something wrong. We don’t do ourselves any favors by contributing to that misinformation.

                      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                        @RettCall

                        There’s nothing to “agree to disagree” on.

                        If I say there is something to disagree, there is something to disagree on.

              • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                @RettCall

                Thank you!

              • March 25, 2015 - Reply

                @RettCall

                EXACTLY. The alternative of violence made civil disobedience attractive.

            • March 24, 2015 - Reply

              @Objection

              Forgiving the White man for his evil helped us obtain rights? You mean the right to be unarmed and shot dead? Do you mean the right to be called a slut when we KNOW he would NOT have labeled a 13 year old White girl a slut. For what reason did he call her that other than his being a misogynist and/or racist?

              Black folks have been forgiving for over 500 years, and it’s giving us an infrastructure and made us “equal” to the White man? No, it’s has gotten us attacked more now that ever. She can forgive the boy, but to request reinstatement is NOT acceptable, and I’m glad the school stood its ground.

              • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                @noirluv45

                Forgiving the White man for his evil helped us obtain rights?

                You cannot deny that MLK talked about love and forgiveness. I believe he talked about it in his “I have a dream speech.” Hi philosophy played a major role in getting the Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed. However, if you don’t want to give his philosophy any credit, I understand.

                You mean the right to be unarmed and shot dead?

                Forgiveness and self-defense are two different things.

                Do you mean the right to be called a slut when we KNOW he would NOT have labeled a 13 year old White girl a slut. For what reason did he call her that other than his being a misogynist and/or racist?

                I never said anything about freedom of speech. But since you asked, people do have the right to call people names. An employer has the right to fire people for calling people names. I agree the guy is a racist and misogynist. I don’t think that takes away from forgiveness.

                Black folks have been forgiving for over 500 years, and it’s giving us an infrastructure and made us “equal” to the White man? No, it’s has gotten us attacked more now that ever.

                I don’t know where you are going with this. I don’t believe the guy physical attacked her. Again, I think you are confusing self-defense with forgiveness.

                She can forgive the boy, but to request reinstatement is NOT acceptable, and I’m glad the school stood its ground.

                An employer has the right to fire an employee. I don’t think you or I have the right to tell Mo’ne her belief is not acceptable.

        • March 23, 2015 - Reply

          @mbeezy

          You keep on forgiving folks who regard you as subhuman, the rest of us will be glad when they get outed like this fool did.

        • March 23, 2015 - Reply

          @mbeezy

          mbeezy, I’m not saying she should hold a grudge, but forgiveness does not come free. You see, I can forgive someone for what they say or do, but that does not absolve them from the consequences of what they say or do. He needs to as HER for forgives, and even though he said he was wrong, I don’t believe it for one bit. He said it, and he meant it.

          • March 24, 2015 - Reply

            @noirluv45

            mbeezy, I’m not saying she should hold a grudge, but forgiveness does not come free.

            Can you please explain where you are getting this understanding from?

            • March 24, 2015 - Reply

              @Objection

              I’m getting it from the fact that even though a person may be forgiven, there are oftentimes consequences to be paid. Read the story of David in the Bible. He was a man after God’s own heart, and he committed some horrible sins. Yes, he repented, but if you can recall, he went through (excuse the expression) hell, and he paid for what he did.

              That’s what I’m talking about.

              • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                @noirluv45

                Thanks for explaining.

                • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                  @Objection

                  You’re welcomed, Objection.

                • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                  @Objection

                  You’re welcomed.

        • March 24, 2015 - Reply

          @mbeezy

          I agree with you. Sometimes I don’t always do the right thing. Forgiveness is for the strong not the weak.

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @Anthony

        The sad thing is, they probably were worried about retaliation. They are probably worried about Mo’ne’s future. You know that there are some people in this country who think that they are above correction, and they may try to take that out on Mo’ne. It’s sad all around.

      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

        @Anthony

        You don’t have to forgive anybody Anthony. However, suggesting the coach should be slapped is just ridiculous. Why should he be slapped for his belief? Why can’t you respect him for following the teachings of Jesus Christ? Last week you were going hard because Creflo Dollar was not following the teachings of Jesus Christ. Now, you are suggesting a person should be slapped for following the teachings of Jesus Christ.

        • March 24, 2015 - Reply

          @Objection

          Objection, since you want to get religious, remember lying is a sin. I never mentioned Jesus in the Creflo Dollar thread.

          • March 24, 2015 - Reply

            @Anthony

            LOL, ok Anthony. I stand by what I said.

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @PurpNGold1

      Question: Do anybody know the race of her coach? I know it is a question that seems out-of-the ballpark.

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @PurpNGold1

      I disagree. I think Mo taking the high road is all about who she is as a person. Treat others as you want to be treated is way. Someone has to show an example. I think she is a class act.

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @mbeezy

        No one ‘has to show’ anything, least of all a child who was minding her business. We already knew she is a class act.

        NO ONE is obligated to provide teachable moments for a miserable, racist, misogynist asshole who needed to learn a lesson.

        • March 23, 2015 - Reply

          @vintage3000

          Say that, vintage!!!!! Say that!!!

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @mbeezy

        You show people how to treat you, as Mo’ne will learn as she matures. Even now there are people going on about how what the ball player said must not be that bad, if the child and her coach are asking that he not face (the totally appropriate) consequences.

        Anthony was spot on with what he said about forgiveness, which, by the way, does not mean allowing yourself to be a pushover.

        • March 23, 2015 - Reply

          @PurpNGold1

          You hit the nail on the head! Forgiveness should not involve reflexively rolling over the moment someone is cruel to you. The best lesson Joey Casselberry can learn is that being a racist, sexist, bully, has a price. He does not deserve a quick reprieve from Mo’ ne, and I am disgusted with her coach. The only thing I can think of for his behavior, besides being a handkerchief headed coon, is that this child’s handlers have dollars in their eyes, and they are thinking about marketing and her image. Frankly, I am worried about of the money making endeavors that are popping up for her. She is a great athlete, and her athletic ability needs further training and refinement. I am also worried that she may eventually lose her amateur status and scholarship eligibility. This is really important for a girl, because outside of tennis, women athletes just don’t make the kind of men that men athletes can earn.

          • March 23, 2015 - Reply

            @Anthony

            “You hit the nail on the head! Forgiveness should not involve reflexively rolling over the moment someone is cruel to you” That’s true but to athletes what Joey Casselberry said was not cruel at all Mo’ne is an athlete and she knows in competitive sports she has said worst and heard worst typically athletes have thick skin because they hear a lot when thing go south doing the game so they are not offended by what would offend most non athletes.

            • March 23, 2015 - Reply

              @TheBurningBush

              There is no way what he said should ever be justified. Her being an athlete has nothing to do with it. That’s like giving comics a pass to just say what they want. Guess what? Most know who they can/can’t talk about, and the LGBTQ community is on that list.

              Anyone would not see what he said as cruel lacks morals and character. I wonder what they’d say if someone called their 13 year old daughter or sister a slut. That should’ve never come out his mouth. If he was going to criticize how she played the sport, that’s one thing, but slut. No justification whatsoever.

              • March 23, 2015 - Reply

                @noirluv45

                Exactly.

                Sister Mo’ne is a 13 year old girl. For anyone to call her that slur is totally sick. I heard of some perverted things, but this Joey character is one of the offensive, sick people that I have heard of.

                • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                  @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                  You know, truth! The things that gets me as well are the ones (adults) who defending this sickness. I mean, it’s like, “Hey, they play competitive sports, they’ll have to endure vulgar and uncivilized comments.” We excuse comedians the same way. No wonder many of our children don’t have morals or good character!

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @noirluv45

                    Good Afternoon Sister,

                    Adults have to be living examples to children. There is absolutely no excuse for a male to call a girl out of her name at all. Sports are fun, but human decency is important to advance. We have to defend Mo’ne Davis and expose Joey for what he is. We should never support evil and accountability ought to exist for those who make such sick sexist comments against a child.

                    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                      Good afternoon Brother!

                      Yes, adults do. We are supposed to teach the younger generation, but we sure have failed them, having we, truth.

                      I could NOT agree with you more. To make excuses is to excuse evil, and evil must always be exposed. If we don’t do it, who will. We have to protect our children from the likes of Joey, and like you said, expose him for what he is.

                    • March 25, 2015 - Reply

                      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                      I’ve mentioned before that I’m not American, so I’m not really up on the slang. I’m wondering about a phrase that I see all the time but don’t understand, so if you could please explain to me what it means to ‘call a person out of his name’ I’d be much obliged. I get the part about it being about insulting a person horribly, but the syntax throws me off. Is it an allusion, what does a person’s name mean to this argument and can a person be called out of it?

                      • March 25, 2015 - Reply

                        @Jo 'Mama' Besser

                        Hello Sister.

                        Yes, American slang is diverse and unique. The meaning of the slang phrase “calling someone out of their name” means that someone is disrespecting a person in an inappropriate way personally. In essence, the phrase means that someone is disrespecting someone and calling a person names that is not what he or she should be called. It is a figure of speech or a slang word that is commonly used in the USA.

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @noirluv45

                    “”Hey, they play competitive sports, they’ll have to endure vulgar and uncivilized comments.”” the thing is that y’all don’t want to understand and except is that she most likely do it too…..she most likely will say vulgar and what you will call uncivilized comments to other players sorry that’s the truth whether y’all want to except it or not. Lets stop trying to put a halo over her head and let her enjoy her time playing baseball with the boys.

                    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                      @TheBurningBush

                      How do you know? If she did, that still wouldn’t make it right? Not everyone says vulgar things. You are assuming. Do you know Mo’ne?

                      The truth is no matter what the profession, a person does not have a right to call someone out his/her name. Period, end of story.

              • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                @noirluv45

                “Her being an athlete has nothing to do with it.” really it does because in the world of competitive sports they say things to each other and talk chit to each other that most people would be offended by but it does not offend them like it offend say you [no disrespect]. ” I wonder what they’d say if someone called their 13 year old daughter or sister a slut.” if they had a daughter involved in competitive sports I guarantee they have they call the boys worst the saying is “you give some chit you got to be able to take some chit” remember she is playing with the boys and they say it and hear it all.

                • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                  @TheBurningBush

                  TBB, it offends me because anyone with morals and decency should be offended. I don’t care who it is or what their profession, words need to be checked. A person cannot go around saying what they want, especially working for an organization, have to be made accountable for what they say or do. You are making excuses because of what these people do. So basically you are saying, “Hey, this is the game of competitive sports, so they should feel free to say what they wish. I question your mindset, TBB. I really do. I hope you don’t have children, and if you do, I hope you don’t teach them that they can say offensive things to a person, and it’s OK.

                  If you don’t see the problem with this, then there’s not reason to discuss this any further.

                  P.S. No wonder kids are the way they are if we have adults justifying their poor behavior.

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @noirluv45

                    I respectfully understand where you are coming from however I disagree because sports is like life everything is not going to be all nice and neat and proper I dredd to see that day in sports because like in life in order to win, get the upper hand and succeed some time you got to fight dirty, be abrasive, crass etc. and sometimes violent Mo’en knows this she is a pitcher she knows some time to get a batter off the plate she will have to come inside hard with a 95MPH fastball that might hit him to brush him back if it hits him she can’t cry or feel sorry for him because that the nature of the game if you can’t be tuff, hard, sometimes mean and thick skin you don’t need to be in competitive sports and that’s why many wash out. All I am saying is lets not kill her joy she is playing ball with the big boys if we keep trying to make a princes out of her or put a halo over her head causing her to be ostracize and jealous parents pull their boys off the team and take them elsewhere leaving Mo’en with a sorry team that’s going to hurt this sweet young girl so lets let her have fun and enjoy playing baseball with the boys that’s all I am saying.

                    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                      @TheBurningBush

                      I understand what you are saying. I really do, but we’ll agree to disagree. I think it all comes down to a person’s value system and moral compass. No matter what professional one is in, people take the high road. It’s not easy, but neither is life.

                      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                        @noirluv45

                        true right on but most people are decent people and if they feel something they say will offend some one they won’t say it around them.

                        • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                          @TheBurningBush

                          …and that’s what they are supposed to do. That old mantra is right: “If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say it at all.” You know what, TBB, I also think if one must say something critical, it’s not necessarily what they say, but how they say it. You know what I mean?

                          • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                            @noirluv45

                            ok

                          • March 25, 2015 - Reply

                            @noirluv45

                            yep I feel you!

            • March 23, 2015 - Reply

              @TheBurningBush

              Using your logic, all of the racial slurs shouted at Jackie Robinson were fine and dandy.

              • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                @Anthony

                nope that was different much different and a different time. in todays time whether we like it or not young people call each others out of their names all the time without being offended young girls call each other the “B” word and PC patrols want to make it a crime when they call themselves that all the time, young boys call each other the “N” or “C” word and not be offended the only difference is we now have self appointed political correct patrols and people with thin skin always looking for pity, to be victims or to be offended.

                • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                  @TheBurningBush

                  BS, this is a grown man calling a girl a vulgar name. Nothing makes that acceptable.

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @Anthony

                    Man I was a athlete and have been involved in athletics and competitive youth athletics for years AAU included and I am telling y’all in all honesty this is in no way the worst in that environment so I know like Mo’em knows we are making way too much out of this lets let this young girl enjoy her youth and playing ball with the boys because she don’t want the boys having to feel like they have to walk on egg shells around her or treat her any different because she is a female, let not cause her to quit or cause her teammates parents to pull them off the team because we want to put a halo over her head then she is left with a sorry baseball team because of our touchy feeling. If this was a 13 year old boy we would not be talking about this because we would not have known heard about it.

                    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                      @TheBurningBush

                      So it’s more important that boys feel comfortable in their bullying than it is for her to not be bullied.

                      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                        @Jo 'Mama' Besser

                        well that will be on her like some boys they don’t feel comfortable in that environment and leave and go do something else but I doubt Mo’en will do that I think she can handle it but if she can she will move on to something else and it would be nothing wrong with it. See the thing is what you call bullying is fun to them it’s par for the course it’s like they say “if you can’t take it don’t dish it out”.

                        • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                          @TheBurningBush

                          She shouldn’t *have* to deal with this. If some mind basic boys can’t understand that they are there to play a game and that no girl is obligated to absorb their slurs ad infinitum then *that* is on them and on the people who gave them idea that that kind of mindset is acceptable. Culture isn’t static, it changes and grows alongside the society to which it belongs and it’s about time that we get rid of the idea that the victim is in the wrong for not submitting to bullying. If tossing out abuses is so integral to the game experience that you have to take your ball and go home (so to speak) when it’s no longer condoned, good riddance because you obviously weren’t there for the love of the game. If you’re so dependent upon being a bully, childhood is when you snuff that out, you don’t look away. Is this the Good Sportsmanship that is supposedly lauded above all else?

                          • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                            @Jo 'Mama' Besser

                            who is the victim here cause Mo’en sure don’t think she is a victim?

                            • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                              @TheBurningBush

                              Alright, keep calling children sluts, see where it takes you.

                              • March 24, 2015

                                @Jo 'Mama' Besser

                                NOWHERE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                          • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                            @Jo 'Mama' Besser

                            you are right she shouldn’t have to be dealing with this she should not have heard about this but the idiot did like most idiots of today he tweeted it put in out on social media however Mo’en handle it in the best possible way, she took the hi road and I am proud of her.

                            • March 25, 2015 - Reply

                              @TheBurningBush

                              I stated somewhere on the thread that I think her act of personal courage is a wonderful thing, but the fact that she has to ‘forgive’ anything is indicative of the fact that someone did something wrong. It’s good that the school heard her concerns and acknowledge her maturity and strength of character but I’m glad that they’re holding firm. Sports culture can treat women so badly and I’m completely on school side because it has shown that standing up for a black girl’s dignity is more important than massaging some loser’s White Manly Tears Ego. I’m sure this guy’s persecution complex is all DEFCON-1 right now, but he has no one to blame but himself. I think we tend to expect more from people who have been hurt than from those who do the hurting.

                      • March 25, 2015 - Reply

                        @Jo 'Mama' Besser

                        well in her world the world of competitive athletes what you view as bullying IS NOT BULLYING that’s what I am trying to get y’all to see..

                        • March 25, 2015 - Reply

                          @TheBurningBush

                          What we’re trying to get YOU to see is that you’re making a lot of excuses to explain away his stupidity. Do you think that you are the only one here who has ever played a sport before and the world of sports is this mystical land that us plebes could never understand? There are a lot of people posting here, some of whom have played sports before, and yet, none of them see this as appropriate and none of them believe that adults should relate to children in exactly the same way that they do to adults, and they don’t believe that strangers do, or should act the same way with each other as they do with friends and colleagues. Of course the things that adults say will carry extra weight to a kid, but you’re insisting that because they both toss balls around she has to automatically understand what some stranger means when he calls her a dirty name and he gets to wear some kind of cloak of non-accountability because you’ve decided to take his side.

                          Who asked for his stupid opinion, anyway? The fact that she has taken it upon herself to forgive him proves that he has committed an act of transgression that warrants forgiveness, but still you insist that he has done nothing wrong. Neither you nor I know how either this man or this child interact with the people with whom they play, but I’m going to bet that he doesn’t play with or against the opposite sex so his opportunities to call people sluts, you know, only *professionally* are limited. So what’s next, are we going to have to have a fundraiser for him because he didn’t know ‘slut’ was a bad word because he’s not used to interacting with women on a professional basis? What exactly does an adult man have to do to convince you that he’s capable of being in the wrong?

                          • March 25, 2015 - Reply

                            @Jo 'Mama' Besser

                            I never said that the young man was right, we all make mistakes I like Mo’en don’t think it’s that big of a deal I would put money on it that after he tweeted it he wish he had not did it just like I say things or send comments that my be offensive and I regret that I did it, that’s why sometimes now after I type a comment on certain issue I save it and wait before I send it that’s because I am a old and mature man young men and women have not learn that yet, I just don’t believe in making a mountain out of a mole hill, to me it ain’t that big of a deal it would have been different if he had said it to her face but he didn’t.

                • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                  @TheBurningBush

                  Wow, I almost didn’t respond to this because only someone
                  who is seriously disturbed would actively look for an excuse to defend an adult calling a 13-year old a slut completely unprompted.

                  But since you operate under the assumption that athletes are heathens and couldn’t possibly be expected to behave like civilized human beings and not throw pejoratives at each other for no earthly reason, I’ll remind you of this. Mo’ne is not this guy’s age-mate. They’re not contemporaries, or colleagues or associates. They don’t play together or know each other. He is an adult. She is a child. If you can’t even admit that there is a line there that adults shouldn’t cross when it comes to minors, whether they’re athletes, celebrities, or just plain regular kids, then this comment is even more pathetic than I assumed.

                  Moaning about “political correctness” stops when adults become bullies of children. That shouldn’t even be up for debate, and yet there is always someone who tries. anyways.

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @RettCall

                    look I appreciate your reply you use the word Bully which is a dead give away that you don’t understand the athletics culture because bullying is what they do Mo’ne included “Moaning about “political correctness” stops when adults become bullies of children” in youth competitive sport parents with thin skin have to get thick skin or pull their children off the team because it’s not a PC world most likely that parents kid will ask them not to come around if they can’t handle it.

                    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                      @TheBurningBush

                      There you go using that word “PC” again. I don’t think you
                      know what it means. Expecting adults not to participate in the harassment and yes, bullying, of young athletes is not PC, it’s basic human decency and maturity. Once you reach a certain age you realize that some people aren’t
                      acceptable targets, especially ones who are significantly younger than you. Athletes are not magically devoid of common sense on that front.

                      “The culture made them do it” is a sorry and pathetic excuse for any kind of poor behavior. Joey is not devoid of logical reasoning just because he plays a sport. Calling a young girl a slut simply for existing is bullying no matter how much you want to pretend athletic culture embraces that kind of nonsense. Athlete or not, at the end of the day she is still barely a teenager and there is some leeway and respect that she is owed for being young and successful and doing nothing wrong.

                      Mo’ne has already gotten her share of bullying from people
                      her own age, boys and their parents who were upset that she was besting them at their sport. It’s not unreasonable to demand that an adult not contribute to that environment. If you truly believe what this guy did was acceptable there
                      really is no help for you.

                      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                        @RettCall

                        Thank you!!!! I guess I shouldn’t be surprised that people would justify such a thing.

                      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                        @RettCall

                        “There you go using that word “PC” again” yep I hate PC…………

                        • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                          @TheBurningBush

                          And yet you remain completely ignorant about its context and when and where to apply it. That’s what happens when people use buzzwords they don’t comprehend.

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @RettCall

                    Thank you but save your breath @ theburningbush is a misogynistic black male he cannot be saved or reasoned with
                    The only oppression in the world that is relevant is that of the black male , racism and sexism experienced by black woman is always excusable Hes the kinda guy that insists that the 10 yr old rape victim was fast or asking for it and he reason why he barely has a high school education, a minimum wage job and has been incarcerated was that darn black feminism
                    His only purpose in life is to police BW and girls and remind them not to pass their place which is always rungs below BM ,,,,pathetic

                • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                  @TheBurningBush

                  They are conditioned to call others out their names, and they are conditioned to not let it bother them because of the foolish, “Sticks and stones” nonsense. Words hurt whether we try to put on a brave front or not. Calling someone out their name is wrong, and should not be condoned just because it’s done.

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @noirluv45

                    true words hurt but a lot of things in life hurt so one got to grow thick skin and move on because 9 times out of 10 they don’t meant no real harm. “Calling someone out their name is wrong, and should not be condoned just because it’s done.” in a way true you are right if it offends them but lets be honest we all do it and meant no offence just today I have talk to three friends from Philadelphia to South Florida and at some point doing the conversation I bet we referred to someone of each other as a “MFer”, “SOB”, “F word”, “B word”, “C sucker” etc. and meant no harm but we don’t talk around other people like that.

                    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                      @TheBurningBush

                      Wouldn’t you agree that the intent of what we say is important? If that’s the language you use with your friends, then that’s you. You’re grown, and I don’t believe in being the word police. However, that has nothing to do with this man, who is not Mo’ne’s friend, calling her a slut. There’s no justification for that.

                      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                        @noirluv45

                        noting trying to justify it all I am saying it is what it is and lets not make more out of it than what it is lets let Mo’en enjoy playing baseball with the boys and lets not spoil it for her by forcing people to handle her with kid gloves, forcing people to walk around her like they are walking on egg shells see the guys that say crap like that don’t much bother her it us who want to put a halo over her head and make her untouchable that will make her take off her cleats and throw in her glove and quit because we are taking the fun out of it for her so what I am saying if we keep on will make her quit you don’t have to believe me but I have seen it before mark my word.

                      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                        @noirluv45

                        I don’t think the guy had ill will toward her he was just shooting off at the mouth probably because of jealousy of all the attention Mo’en is getting in the media movie etc. other boys preformed just as well or better in the LLWS but we don’t even know their names but Mo’en had nothing to do with that, see things like this is what makes young people quit something they love and enjoy because adults take all of the joy out of it for them they all want to be a part of the boys not be put on a pedestal and I think that’s what black people are trying to do with her and it ain’t going to work, watch what I say.

                  • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                    @noirluv45

                    Preach Sister noirluv45.

                    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                      🙂

                      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

                        @noirluv45

                        🙂

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @mbeezy

        Please take a look at the post on Common that Clutch did last week. Take a look at some of the comments, and let me know what you think of the comments from “Oprah” magazine. Hundreds of years of “taking the high road” and forgiving, and Black people are being murdered and hung as if it is the 1900’s.

        • March 23, 2015 - Reply

          @ALM247

          Thank you!

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @mbeezy

        Blacks have always been turning the other cheek. He does not deserve to get reinstated. People have to realize that what they say can have adverse consequences. How is she going to benefit from an ignorant moron calling her a slut. Trust and believe, I’d hate to see what society would say if he = Black, and Mo’ne = White. We probably wouldn’t be discussing this now because I’m sure he wouldn’t call a 13 year old White girl such a name. JMO.

  6. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    It gets worse and worse. This is a 13 year old girl. Why are her accomplishments so upsetting for adult White men? They are beyond pathetic. It’s also not mandatory that they watch anything they don’t want to. So, don’t.

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @Melissa

      Yep. If a grown man is intimidated by a 13 year old girl, then that grown man needs to go inside his house and stay there for all eternity. That grown man should never mix with society ever again.

      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

        @ALM247

        Exactly. Because he has deep seated issues that need to be addressed. He might be harmful to others.

  7. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    The hateful comments from Joey Casselberry and others show how these vicious people view us. If that now fired individual can slander a talented young black girl, then they have no sense of moral decency for black people in general. Some individuals have to wake up. White racism is not some myth. It is real. Mo’ne Davis deserves respect not only for her intrepid, inspiring talent, but for her amazing character. Her light is shining brightly and no amount of racism, sexism, and any form of bigotry will extinguish her light at all. Jealous cowards like Joey (who should not be reinstated. Accountability should be made) will never stop us. We, as black people, are a strong, courageous people.

  8. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    Misogynist a hole

  9. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    Last week those racist POS at the University of Oklahoma fraternity, Now this piece of human excrement calling this young girl a slut. WTH. These racist scumbags doing the most. SMDH

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @Mary Burrell

      Preach Sister.

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @Mary Burrell

      And a Black man was hung near the Jackson, MS area last week.

      • March 23, 2015 - Reply

        @ALM247

        @ALM247: Otis Byrd in Mississippi and the UAV student beaten to a bloody pulp on St. Patrick’s day and the list goes on and on.

  10. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    Wow….so the Jezebel and Sapphire stereotypes live on….This is a young girl. This is so disrespectful. This is what I was talking about the other day, some (not all) of these folks come at us young….trying to wear down our spirit and our resolve.

    I hope that she always has at least 3 trustworthy family members everywhere she goes. If some folks are bold enough to speak like this in public, then they definitely can not be trusted to be in the locker room with her. Her family may need to hire private security.

    Also, this is the reason why some (not all) Black women hesitate to date interracially. Even though all non-Black men do not think this way, the ones who do make some Black women hesitate to try dating outside of their race. No one wants to deal with the racial stereotypes. It’s bad enough to be treated badly by a man within your own race, but the type of hatred that Casselberry has shown has been going on for hundreds of years in this country.

    • March 23, 2015 - Reply

      @ALM247

      What many black folks learn is that a white person can truly love you while being totally invested in racist notions and stereotypes. That is a major reason why it is not unusual to see biracial folks who have been raised in white households who are more fearful of black folks than actual white people.

      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

        @Anthony

        “What many black folks learn is that a white person can truly love you
        while being totally invested in racist notions and stereotypes”.

        Anthony, can you elaborate on your statement above? This sounds like an entirely new Clutch thread. 🙂

        • March 24, 2015 - Reply

          @ALM247

          What I am saying is just a man can love you and be horribly sexist, a white person can love you while still being racist. Human beings are funny like that.

  11. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    Starbucks still want to talk about racism?

  12. March 23, 2015 - Reply

    I expected this I am talking about the movie, I applaud Mo’ne Davis she is smart, wise and rational about the young man kicked of the baseball team she know like most athletes say “no hurt no harm let’s move on to the next play” and you don’t destroy a young person for a stupid tweet. Mo’ne Davis parents need to guard her from the liberal establishment and media because they will use her up to promote their causes and throw her away. She is to young and is still developing mentally and physically so her parents need to start protecting her from the wolf in sheep cloth. She is still a child.

    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

      @TheBurningBush

      He destroyed himself with that stupid tweet, why defend it? Would you be so forgiving if this were a boy and this person referred to him as a buck? The problem isn’t with people being too uptight, the problem is that men are hiding behind the same ‘boys will be boys’ and locker-room culture as they have since time immemorial to absolve themselves of responsibility for whatever dumb crap they do. She is young and still developing and what she’s learning is that actions have consequences and that it isn’t okay for men to talk about women this way, that isn’t okay for adults to talk about children this way, that it isn’t okay for white people to talk about black people this way and if sports culture condones this, the problem isn’t with the victim, it’s with the culture. This adult and this girl aren’t peers, aren’t teammates, aren’t anything other than two people who happen to throw balls and while it’s wonderful that this girl is personally forgiving him, forgiveness isn’t the same thing as validation. There are many girls out there who are learning that they don’t have to accept treatment that makes them uncomfortable because that’s just how it is and they’ll get used to it, or that they should already be used to it. The school did the right thing, he messed up, he’s being punished, this is fair.

      • March 24, 2015 - Reply

        @Jo 'Mama' Besser

        “He destroyed himself with that stupid tweet, why defend it?” cause I am not a hypocrite. I have done the same thing but not on tweeter “If you live in a glass house don’t throw no stone. “Would you be so forgiving if this were a boy and this person referred to him as a buck?” YEP yes I would be forgiving as long as it wasn’t mean spirited and they won’t picking on him and destroying his dignity or breaking him down no hurt no harm. I don’t understand why y’all have a problem with this when Mo’en don’t.

  13. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    These people are disgusting. Do these adults realize they are talking about a child! And further more, white folks want to say black people are thugs, in jail and up to no good, but when we are doing big things they want to call us everything under the sun but a child of god. Ugh!!

    • March 24, 2015 - Reply

      @GoldenGirl

      “….but when we are doing big things they want to call us everything under the sun but a child of god”.

      And that’s the whole point….to try to wear you down. Don’t let it work.

  14. March 24, 2015 - Reply

    You know, we can talk for days about how Mo’ne should’ve handled this situation, but, as usual, we discuss what the victim should do, and NOT the perpetrator should do. This boy who made the comment should be the topic of discussion. What kind of society creates people like him? What kind of society excuses people like him? He’s the source of the problem, not Mo’ne.

  15. March 26, 2015 - Reply

    Forgiveness is a sign of weakness failure and submission. These attributes are not apart of our history or culture. The black church was a community center as the pinks would not come to our churches. MLK talked the talk of religion but lobbied for the Civil Rights bill of 1964. This act had nothing to do with religion, this was politics.

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