Yesha Callahan
  1. January 20, 2015 - Reply

    When I’m curious about one’s ethnicity, I usually just ask what the person’s family background is.

  2. January 20, 2015 - Reply

    I was taught that it was rude to do that unless the person volunteers the information

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @Mary Burrell

      I agree. In this era anyone could be anything.

  3. January 20, 2015 - Reply

    I wouldn’t ask anyone about their race per se. Some people would just tell their ethnic backgrounds without you asking them. If someone volunteers to do it then that is fine. Hypothetically, if someone wants to do it, then that person should do it respectfully like asking a person about their heritage or their family tree first. The person should also say that he or she doesn’t have to answer the inquiry if he or she doesn’t want to.

  4. January 20, 2015 - Reply

    There is no such thing as race. And there is nothing wrong with asking someones ethnic or national origin. But the BIG question is whether they identify with black folks no matter how dark. That may get you in trouble.

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @D1Mind

      Unless it is demanded of someone I don’t see that coming up. Often people are not ok with the answer such as asking someone you swore was _____ but then they tell they are ______. Often black identifying inviduals asking the questions can’t take the reality for the answer and become invasive.

      • January 26, 2015 - Reply

        @Through With Buzz

        It is an issue of identity politics. In the past, all black people no matter how mixed were black. In Central and South America they always have had more racial categories than the USA for various types of mixtures. Either way however, there is only one white and that held above all others and is not mixed in terms of ‘white’ identity. Which means does everyone else identify as mixed or black? At the end of the day it is a personal choice, but for black people it is important because there are too many folks who are quick to jump off the black bus when given the chance. And that can be good or bad depending on how you look at it. It is good if you want to know who really has your best interests in mind as a collective people and bad when it comes to assumptions about how certain people will think or act based on skin color alone. Case in point Barack Obama and many other black politicians…..

        • January 26, 2015 - Reply

          @D1Mind

          They were not all labelled by American society-not even close. Many whites with less European looks than many multi racial Black identifying individuals have been perceived as white and accepted. White identity has been as murky in the US as Black identity if you look at immigration laws and who became white when. “…but for black people it is important because there are too many folks who are quick to jump off the black bus when given the chance.” Which means what? That Black people get the right to verbally vet, question and even harass those they think are doing so?

          • January 27, 2015 - Reply

            @Through With Buzz

            Any history of the white colonial racial system of social organization and oppression reveals clearly a pattern of distinguishing and upholding white identity and its purity by not being diluted with any other so called race. Unfortunately this is simply a fact of history. Some negroes like to sit here and pretend that they can twist history on its ear in order to make themselves feel better. But it wont work because the truth always reveals itself.

            What is a one drop rule if white society wasn’t determined to keep themselves ‘pure’ and separate from other people in order to maintain their control over the land, power and wealth. And it wasn’t just in North America either. Suffice to say, no comparable system of ‘racial’ separation has ever been found in any African nation and therefore to even begin to suggest that this originates with or is the fault of black folks is ridiculous. You need to go back and read the 3/5ths compromise and understand what that meant and stop making up stuff.

            And honestly this is what happens when mixed up people (not racially but mentally) allow other people to use them to suit their agenda. Anybody who claims that racial identity politics starts with black folks is either retarded or simply looking for non black acceptance.

            • January 27, 2015 - Reply

              @D1Mind

              What truth? “Evil Black tainted blood”? Sounds like Nazi blood laws…great “truth”…We are not talking about the past. This is about the article and from what I’ve seen in today’s world , Black people are far more aggressive and angry about how mixed or the people they perceive to be mixed, choose of their own free will to identify. It is bizarre that you assume that any free thinking adult “would be used to suit an agenda”. Racial identity politics may not have started with Black identified people but they are today, in the US, at least the biggest upholders and enforces of the one drop via/racial vetting via internalized self hatred and an unwillingness to evolve away from internalized white supremacy.

              • January 31, 2015 - Reply

                @Through With Buzz

                No black people are not aggressive about who is mixed. What on earth are you even talking about? A lot of black people in the United States, Caribbean, Africa and Asia ARE mixed and STILL identify as black. So what the hell are you droning on about. Starting off with the current President of the United States.

                Like I said, racial politics did not start with black folks and anybody trying to use mixed black people to promote such an agenda of rewriting history needs to be exposed as a clown. Mixed people have been accepted and integrated into black society from forever and there never was a problem. But opposite is not true. And that is where the Nazis come into play because American white supremacists like German white supremacists believe in racial ‘purity’ and are aggressive in maintaining it. So again, why are you confusing black folks with white supremacists? I think you need to sit and think about what you are saying, because you are getting things mixed up literally.

  5. January 21, 2015 - Reply

    I didn’t find this video terribly useful. Mixed people need to get over themselves. As a black person from South America, I get all sorts of stupid questions from Americans about my race, my ethnicity, my hair and where I’m “actually” from. I generally confuse a lot of people who assume they know a lot about me just based on my skin color. But guess what, I ask people stupid questions all the time too. I’m not exempt. Hence, either answer the stupid question or tell them to bugger off. It’s not that serious.

    And it’s really annoying when black people go on and on about how they are a little bit of Polish, and Irish and German and Alien and green and cyborg and this and that. Nobody else does that. Most of the time you have to pull my teeth before I reveal that my ancestry is riddled with random non-blacks.

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @Tira Masu

      That is nice for you but others might not feel like erasing their other ancestries. It is a white supremacist enforced concept that you are embracing straight up.

  6. January 21, 2015 - Reply

    Here it goes:
    Me: Dang girl, you are so pretty…and look at them curls. I am dying to see what your parents look like!
    Mixed girl: Okay. So, like my mom is Cherokee, Scotch Irish and Black. And uh, my dad is like Black and Chinese. But he’s only one fourth Chinese so that makes me like 1 part Scotch Irish and 2 parts Black and one part cherokee…with a splash of Chinese…bla bla bla bla bla.
    Done.

    • January 21, 2015 - Reply

      @Love.tweet.joi

      Mixed girl: What are you?
      Me: I use to drive a Japanese car. Now I drive a Jeep Grand Cherokee. My daddy just bought a German car and my mommy drive an Italian car. But the police pulled me over because I look like a black guy driving a new car that might be stolen.

      • January 21, 2015 - Reply

        @Objection

        I know a guy who was told his mercedes wasnt his. It had his last name on the plates. Smh.

        • January 21, 2015 - Reply

          @Love.tweet.joi

          The police arrested me claiming my commercial drivers license (CDL) was suspended. Keep in mind, I never had a CDL and I was driving a small Toyota.

          • January 21, 2015 - Reply

            @Objection

            Wow. That’s insane.

  7. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    Yeah, I wait till they tell me or it very naturally comes up in convo. If you’re not a census taker, why is it such important info that anyone so desperately needs to know?

  8. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    You don’t. It’s rude, especially if it’s someone you don’t know very well. If you’re friends with someone, as time passes, it will usually come up in casual conversation. If you aren’t friends with someone, well it’s not really any of your business, is it?

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