Yesha Callahan

Lee Daniels: White People Can “Really Love Us” And Still Call Us “N**gas”

lee-daniels

I guess you shouldn’t expect any other type of comment from the man behind  Precious and The Butler.

During an appearance at the National Association of Black Journalists convention in Orlando, Florida, Lee Daniels said that it is possible for White people to “really love” Black people and still call them “n*ggas,”. His comments were made after he was explaining his use of the “n” word in The Butler:

“For me, it was very strategic,” Daniels told a group of reporters at NABJ. “When we did use it, it was used later on by Cuba [Gooding Jr., as the head butler] making fun of someone that did use it, Lyndon Johnson. It was sort of the joke that this guy uses it. So when he says it and talks about, it opens up —  like Paula Deen — the concept of white people loving us and really loving us and feeling that it’s fine to use the word nigga. That’s how Johnson felt. He did something that was incredible for us. That’s trying to be taken away from us right now. And yet, he used that word just like ‘pass the grits.’ Racism is a very hard thing to explain, especially in the South.”

Sorry, but no, Lee Daniels.  Racism isn’t that hard to explain. Especially in the south.

What do you think about Lee Daniels’ comments?

  1. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    I actually was expecting a whole different article after reading the headline.

  2. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    I’m done with people…

  3. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    I don’t trust this guy at all and I am getting sick of these slaves, maids, and butler movies. We tried to hard to try to figure white people out like complex figures but they never do the same for us.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @geenababe

      geen: You must be a very young person, and therefore can’t relate to the story he’s telling in The Butler. Those that grew up in that time of history can definitely relate, and understand the significance.

  4. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Some black people REALLY love white folks.

  5. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Racism isn’t hard to explain but he surely did a shitty job with his explination…

  6. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    As long as you in you stay in you place……what is that suppose to mean?

  7. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Ok, Mr. Daniels, let me get this straight. You’re saying the use of the N-word by whites is really a term of endearment. From my view its casual use by anyone including LBJ, which has been well documented displays a patent disregard for humanity, not love. And what he did as president and the civil rights initiatives implemented at that time was based on the nation’s general sentiment that segregation was bad for the country.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @Darryl Hines

      And now we see that integration was nothing more than a ploy by the federal government to decrease progress in the black community so it makes perfect sense that LBJ used the n word. Pretty much everything the Feds have done to “free” us has actually done the complete opposite in the long run at the very least from a social and economic standpoint.

      • August 7, 2013 - Reply

        @Queenpin

        Queen so are you saying that you would rather that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 wasn’t passed? Did you actually experience living through that time period? And believe me I get your bigger drift in that (some) people think that one of the biggest issues is that Black people would still have Black owned stores, Black Doctors and Lawyers offices in Black neighborhoods if it wasn’t for integration. I say that’s an excuse. No one is stopping a Black person from opening up a business in a black neighborhood

      • August 7, 2013 - Reply

        @Queenpin

        @ Pepper, I think the point is that integration gave us a false sense of acceptance that made us take our eyes of the prize. We are so hungry to be accepted that we don’t take pride in anything unless it is blessed by whites, and segregation fed into that. Yes there is no excuse for not continuing the legacy that was started, but I believe that shipped sailed.

      • August 8, 2013 - Reply

        @Queenpin

        @Pepper

        No, I’m simply saying that from an idealistic standpoint integration would be great, but instead, all it did was force us to be even closer to those that hate us. This was not a mistake on the part of the government. The statistics and common sense show us that this was not, generally speaking, beneficial to the black community. I’m satisfied with any bill, act, statute, etc. that broadens civil rights for all human beings. My issue is with the real world application of said legislation. And if you think the federal government has not, does not, and won’t continue to curb UNIFIED black prosperity, you’re sadly mistaken.

  8. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    I actually understood his explanation…he was discussing his use off the word in the movie by the character played by Cuba. The character references Lyndon Johnson who used “ninja” casually but was probably the US president who was most effective at securing the rights of black people in the US within a legal framework. That effectiveness would be the “love” in question. Given a choice between love with lip service and love with actual action, I would take the latter anyday.

    Personally, I am on the fence as regards Johnson’s motivation but I do not question his effectiveness. I think Johnson’s was driven to address race in the US because the US was in a global struggle for hearts and mind with the Soviet Union and in the majority of the developing world especially Africa, the marxist would point to the treatment of blacks in the US as proof positive as to why US policy was not good for anyone who was not white.

    I would disagree that Johnson loved black folks but like Lincoln it was to his benefit to get Civil Rights, Voting Rights and the War on Poverty legislation passed. In his battle was with the global marxist movement he had to show an America that was working to the benefit of all peoples or else lose the propoganda war.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @rastaman

      Your very assessment of Lee Daniels’ statements is spot on; how others came to differing conclusions is quite beyond me. I think the headline is also misleading.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @rastaman

      Thank you for supplying context

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @rastaman

      Thank your English teacher(s) you have great comprehension skills. Sadly other commentors didn’t get that privilege.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @rastaman

      This is one of the most astute and rational comments I’ve read on this site in a long time.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @rastaman

      In reality there were several other factors going on concurrently with the propaganda war between the West and the Soviet Bloc. Too many to list in an internet post. But this gist of the matter is this. LBJ did what he HAD to do for several national and international political reasons. He was operating in realpolitik mode . He had NO respect at all for black people. Perhaps he felt a passing affection for them the way a person feels for their favorite pet, but you simply as a person of privilege and power, can not use a word like that against a marginalized group and simultaneously see them as equals or full human beings. And for Daniels to say that the issue was “complex” and that by using this vile word he really loved blacks exposes him for the craven, grovelling boot-licking sycophant that he is.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @rastaman

      @rastaman, that was a great explanation or interpretation of Johnson’s Civil Rights policy. Thanks for a fine post!

  9. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Comments like that make not want to support this queen’s work.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @Orange Starr Happy Hunting

      Orange: “queen’s work”??? Uuuum…quite interesting. So in essence you are being discriminatory just like some white people were (and some still are) against black people. SMH

  10. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Wow. Coontastic. Somebody get this man some watermelon and tap shoes. It seems the most vocal/famous blacks genuinely enjoy shucking and jiving for white people. I just smh…don’t know what to do anymore.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @Kellogg Liberbaum

      I know, what you mean. I am so ashamed when there are Blacks who publicly proclaim their love and forgiveness for racist White behaviour.
      It is so pathetic, sometimes I honestly wish that people like that would disappear off the face of the earth. Harsh, I know, but I hate Blacks like that.

  11. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Oh yes! Love! I get it. Oppression,slavery, supremacy, apartheid…it’s all love.

  12. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Lies people tell and belive…SMH. I can’t and simply won’t, I am starting to agree with JamesfrmPhilly with his “stockholm syndrome” bit because this is the only way to explain explanations like this. Racism isn’t rocket science either you think someone is inferior to you and should be treated in such and such way because they don’t share the same race as you or not.

  13. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Lee Daniel’s level of self-hatred (which I thought was obvious from watching his movie Precious) is downright embarrassing!

    Did he really describe white people’s racism and n-word-using ways as “Love”? Was it “love” that caused them to string up black people on trees and cut their balls off? (I’m afraid to delve further into his self-mutilating and self-deprecating mind, which is usually on display in movies like Precious, Monster’s Ball, Paperboy, etc.)

    I’m now afraid to see The Butler (and witness some hard-to-digest racially humiliating scene he just has to insert).

    SMH

  14. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    People….Please don’t see the Butler! I tried to convince people not to watch The Help until I was blue in the face, but to no avail. It’s so obvious to me now, these string of movies only depicting some past racism because it’s easy for whites to digest now that they think “hey it’s over now.” There were even some scenes in the movie showing the black panthers as these evil villains…and you know in the end the movie will somehow demonstrate how their way was wrong…Ugh! These movies do not exist in a vacuum, that’s why it’s important to remain conscious. We need to fight this racism at every level. This must always include entertainment…

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @bk chick

      i agree. it’s like nowadays, black films are all about pain, struggle and heartache. i won’t be seeing this film…just like i didn’t go see the Help.

      • August 8, 2013 - Reply

        @IJusWannaSay...

        What Tariq Nasheed said about films like this is the TRUTH. Films such as the Help, Precious, and this one are made for white folks to feel better about themselves. The President is still black. The economy is still shit to them. So they use these films as an escape mechanism.

    • August 8, 2013 - Reply

      @bk chick

      Thank you! The scene with the Black Panthers was the icing on the cake for me. Any movie that depicts the Black Panthers as villains is a movie for people, regardless of color, lacking accurate historical knowledge.

  15. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Why, exactly, do we need white people to “love us”? My mind is blown that such a discussion actually happened, ever. I had NO IDEA that there were black folks suffering in such a way – like desperate children wondering why their mommy doesn’t love them. I really didn’t get the brain warp that’s grasped some of these black folks. I mean, WOW! These folks are seriously jacked up. It’s creepy. And sad.

  16. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Wow that’s some great insight there Lee word on the street is Paula Deen, Riley Cooper, Michael Richards and Dog the Bounty Hunter subscribe to that same theory as you. I can’t with this dude, and no I won’t be seeing the Butler as I didn’t see the Help or anymore of the domestic/sanitized movies of the black struggle.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @Marisa

      See, you don’t get it. It’s okay when they call us nigga and hang us from trees as long as they promise to love us. We don’t need equality, decency or even respect from white people – just the warm sense that we’re worthy of their cozy, extra snuggly white LOVE.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @Marisa

      i was thinking the same about this movie…….I’m so sick of these white superiority/black inferiority movies where blacks take a** whoopin’s with dignity

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @Marisa

      Thank you! I won’t be spending money on this lawn jockey’s movie. I’m sick of black folks having to spend their money in order to watch pain porn.

      See how much the white folks will love you when this film opens…

      • August 7, 2013 - Reply

        @IJusWannaSay...

        I agree with all of yall these movies always just some like I said watered down view of the black peoples struggles in this country, also were the whites can pat themselves on the back. Oh look how nice we was to the coloreds so all the other sh*t white folks participated in wasn’t all that bad.

        Call me when somebody has the stones to make a movie about somebody like Nat Turner, granted I know I’ll be waiting til the end of time for that to happen.

      • August 7, 2013 - Reply

        @IJusWannaSay...

        OMG a nat turner movie would make my life!!!! but we need more movies about blacks uprising against their oppressors (white People)

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @Marisa

      Marisa: To each his own. So you won’t be seeing The Butler…..well millions of people will be seeing it.

      • August 8, 2013 - Reply

        @Pepper

        Damn Pepper, you’ve been tap dancing all through this comment section. Geez take a break.

  17. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    I feel like rich Black folk suddenly become insensitive to certain racial injustices. Money makes the field a little more level so that it blinds them to the power associated with that word, and other racial slights.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @JN

      Honestly JN, I disagree with the money part. Sure money may get them access to the table sort to speak and afford them better opportunities but I don’t think money changes how people view them. To be frank, I think people who hold a certain view on black people would still see them as “N***** with money”’ nothing more nothing less. In fact, I am a bit more incline to believe that when you have access to money, top education, high grade level of jobs, etc. and you are black you have to prove yourself even MORESO to get people to listen and have to let people know you eared your spot to be here. I think people like Daniels, Oprah, etc. are being dishonest because they still need to pander to the people who don’t see them a great deal differently than the average black person to continue to make a buck for themselves. I do agree that they might not deal with the “average” racial slights/injustices because they are so far removed from certain communities/people but they do deal with a great lot of passive-aggressive micro-racism sessions and subtle racisms. So I believe they are aware but their money and the “clout of power” they THINK they have just make it a bit easier for them to swallow.

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @JN

      JN: And some rappers continue to use the word. Is that ok? Kevin Hart even used the word numerous times in his newest movie

  18. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    IMO : Daniels has some mental illness issues…….

  19. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Its ok you guys all the racism is all gone now and what Lee is the truth and, we can look no further than the person who recently spray painted DIE N****GER on Jackie Robinson’s statute. Doesn’t that just scream BOY DON’T I JUST LOVE BLACK PEOPLE WITH ALL MY HEART, RIP Jackie the world was sick during your time and is hell bent on staying sick now.

  20. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    “Love” and “blatant racism” don’t really go hand in hand. More than that, no one who truly respects their black ‘friend’ would try to get a pass on using such a historically degrading word.

  21. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    There is an old phrase which I think still applies. “It’s not what you are called; but what you answer to”

  22. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    He was speaking about the use of the n-word IN THE MOVIE’S TIME FRAME! THE MOVIE IS SET IN CIVIL WAR TIMES.
    He is saying that IN THAT TIME LBJ would understand the plight of black people but still have no issue with saying the n-word to describe them. Much like Paula Deen grew up hearing the word so it didn’t have the negative connotation FOR HER. It is ingrained in her and LBJ to use it to describe black people.

    The article even says” His comments were made after he was explaining his use of the “n” word in The Butler:”
    Clutch did YOU read this article before getting upset about his comment?

    • August 7, 2013 - Reply

      @ImJustSaying

      Actually…

      From the linked article, “The film also allowed Daniels to delve into the complicated language of racism during the civil rights era. In the film, Johnson, played by Liev Schreiber, uses a racial slur a number of times — something that Daniels said was done on purpose. Johnson biographers have noted that the former President used the term to describe blacks.”

      He’s referring to what went on w/the REAL LBJ….and how even though he used the “n” word..it was acceptable b/c he had so much love for blk ppl…

      So the article is addressing that…

    • August 8, 2013 - Reply

      @ImJustSaying

      Civil War times?

      • August 8, 2013 - Reply

        @Kim

        So I posted a comment correcting myself but Clutch apparently hasn’t approved it. Let’s see if this one gets up
        I meant Civil RIGHTS.
        Also my follow up noted that the linked article was also speaking of the time frame.
        Lee Daniels was speaking of back then not now. I think people are taking his reference of Paula Deen out of context as well. BACK THEN the word was not taboo for white people like Deen in the way it is now(as it should be). Dare I say that it was technically “their word” back then.

        Here’s hoping Clutch approves my comment this time.

  23. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Hmmmm, he sounds like the people who believe that a man can really love you and still beat the crap out of you.

  24. August 7, 2013 - Reply

    Just for that comment I won’t be watching his movie

    • August 8, 2013 - Reply

      @BlackXMessiah

      @BlackXMessiah
      I am on the same page. For some reason I already had reservations about seeing it. Based on trailers — it seems as though Kennedy is going to become the focal point of the film. The individual who brings ‘harmony’ and ‘peace’ to the conflict and The Butler himself will become the sidekick in a sense.
      But nooow, Daniels’ comments have really left a sour taste…

      My question to Daniels: Can your white cast members address you as N*gga instead of Lee and there be no issue?

  25. August 8, 2013 - Reply

    Way too many of us desire the love and approval of white people. It dates back to the slave plantation.

  26. August 8, 2013 - Reply

    @ Pepper

    It’s funny because I was thinking the same thing about you. Your comments always annoyed me and I am just being honest.

    • August 8, 2013 - Reply

      @geenababe

      LOL!

  27. August 8, 2013 - Reply

    After sitting through his hour long porn of Zac Efron in the Paperboy. Anything Lee says I only hear the Peanuts teacher talking. Womp. Womp. Womp. Womp.

  28. August 8, 2013 - Reply

    This man annoys the hell out of me!! Monster’s Ball, Precious and now The Butler….everything he touches is stereotypical and offensive.

  29. August 11, 2013 - Reply

    Kinda like the man who beats his wife but really loves her right Mr Daniels? I can’t stand this man and his issues!

  30. August 14, 2013 - Reply

    this n&&**%r’s crazy!!!

  31. August 14, 2013 - Reply

    Off topic, but this guy showed up on the movie set every day in pajamas. I think that some of his views are problematic. I still refuse to see Monster’s Ball.

  32. August 18, 2013 - Reply

    He’s a funny guy.

  33. August 24, 2013 - Reply

    I hate to say it, but I’m biracial and I’ve experienced this. I used to live next to a couple who were involved in a biker gang. They said nigger all the time. But they also had me at their dinner table and let me babysit their 3 yr old son, and we partied together all the time. They didn’t hate black people. They were just raised in a place where nigger was a normal word. This happens literally all the time. Just because someone says nigger doesn’t mean they’re racist. Tupac even said this about white supremacists he’d met in prison, that he didn’t believe they all really hated black people, and he had a point. I’d rather deal with the white guy who says nigger and invites me to dinner, than deal with the white guy who says African American and thinks its ok to shoot me for wearing a hoodie and walking down his street.

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