Yesha Callahan

Company Revokes Recent Graduate’s Job Offer Because She Has Braids

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Lara Odoffin is definitely taking the high road after she was offered a job and then had the offer rescinded all over her hairstyle.

The Bournemouth University graduate posted the details of the situation on her Facebook page, but chose not to name the employer with the discriminatory policy so as not to “destroy someone’s livelihood and business.” (She’s better than us.) As you can see from the note below, Odoffin was told she would only be allowed to accept the position if she removed her braids.

This type of discriminatory behavior is most certainly not okay, and yet it’s becoming a far too common headline. As if there aren’t enough barriers to employment for women of color, just when we think we’ve gotten in the door, suddenly there’s an additional set of “rules” that only pertain to us and our appearance. According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, “Race discrimination involves treating someone (an applicant or employee) unfavorably because he/she is of a certain race or because of personal characteristics associated with race (such as hair texture, skin color, or certain facial features).” Further, “The law forbids discrimination when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, and any other term or condition of employment.” We would think discriminatory policies against hair textures and styles, as noted by this anonymous employer, would certainly violate this law.

Odoffin’s post has since been shared nearly 4,000 times and the support prompted the young grad to post an additional message of thanks. We also hope she’s seeking legal aide.

  1. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    I wished she would have posted the information about this employer. Sometimes, we have to get beyond respectability politics if we want to make any progress. I am not for suing whenever it suits a person. However, I think some lawsuits are in order — because this isn’t just about grooming. This is about insidious ways in which Black Women are being coerced into using chemical products that may be damaging to the scalp and skin or heat to the hair when such measures are not necessary for purposes of hair grooming. It is time to stop justifying this mess. I don’t care if you are for permed hair or against it and prefer natural.

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @Tajmarie

      YES! I wish she would have as well!

    • December 2, 2015 - Reply

      @Tajmarie

      They said nothing about chemicals.

      • December 2, 2015 - Reply

        @lis

        It doesn’t matter given the variation of texture in hair versus the maintenance required for each style.

  2. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    I just DO NOT GET IT. I mean, what is this fear associated with braids? Now, an afro I can get….its a lot of hair. Some of the natural styles too, because people aren’t used to it. NOT saying any of those is acceptable discrimination, I’m just saying I can understand how some people can be put off by it. But braids? Not dreadlocks, but braids? Well kept braids? “Why is that even a part of the “uniform and grooming products we get from our racist clients?
    Yeah, I answered my own question, didn’t I?

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @LogicalLeopard

      Right or wrong this is not unusual this is a reason some company contract with temporary service to get a feel for someone before they hire them full time, my sister and I had this conversation not too long ago she was talking about a young black man who was working temp. service in the plant she work in and he want to get hire full time with the company but was wondering why they won’t hire him she said she told the young man to cut his hair [it was braids or dreadlocks]and if they hire him grow it back, she said he cut his hair and low and behold they hired him full time she said that boy came and thanked her for tell him that and said he won’t going to ever grow that hair back [he was so happy to have him a full time good paying job]. I don’t know what company this is however by being in management before usually no officer of the company would make a move like this with out running it pass HR and the legal department had to have approve withdrawing the job offer matter of fact most likely this letter came from HR, technically she was never hired and they don’t have to hire anyone they don’t want to hire now once you are hired that’s a different story.

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        Well, we KNOW it’s not unusual, but the question is whether it is right or wrong. And yes, it’s WRONG. Why should a man have to be told to cut his hair and grow it back? How insane is that? If it’s not a problem when he gets hired in, why is it a problem in getting a job? That’s absolutely ridiculous, and points out an unnecessary, arbitrary race-based judgment.

        • December 1, 2015 - Reply

          @LogicalLeopard

          well I see what you are saying which would be true in a perfect world but we do not live in a prefect world, he need the job, he was driving a old car and couldn’t afford to fill the tank up but thank god was wise enough to make an adjustment and was happy he got the job he needed, what our people must understand is “in order to gain anything in life you must sacrifice something” so this young man was wise enough to do basic math and cut his hair and got him a good paying job one so good he could now afford to buy a home, make car payments etc. support his children and take a young lady on a good date some times “with his pockets fat” and don’t have to try and sell a little weed to supplement his income etc., so he gained he came out to the good and didn’t miss that hair at all. Peace LL.

          • December 1, 2015 - Reply

            @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

            We don’t live in a perfect world, but we can make it more perfect. And that starts with eliminating silly things like unnecessary “adjustments” to unnecessary things.
            You say that “in order to gain anything in life you must sacrifice something.” That usually applies to time, effort, delayed gratification, and plain, hard work. But this, this is not sacrifice, it’s just rank pettiness and discrimination. Because honestly, if we were telling a white woman to shave her head bald for a job as a certified public accountant, then grow it back after she got the job, for NO reason, we wouldn’t be having a conversation about sacrifice. But peace to you as well, always peace!

            • December 1, 2015 - Reply

              @LogicalLeopard

              I feel you but dress codes are not unusual, LL you live in NYC did you know the New York Yankees have a dress and personal appearance code the strictest in professional sports to play or work for the Yankees you have to keep a hair cut and be clean shaved any other baseball club you can have long hair a beard unshaved etc. but you know this if you want to play for the Yankees and guess what almost everybody want to play for the Yankees and they will cut that hair and shave because they want that big contract from the Yankees.

              • December 1, 2015 - Reply

                @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                Sure, I know dress codes aren’t unusual, but when you’re dealing with a dress code that 1) serves no purpose, and 2) is prejudicial, then you have a problem.
                I don’t believe that almost everyone wants to play for the Yankees, or any team with such a dress code (I think there’s a handful of teams that do). But the thing is, the Yankee policy definitely serves no purpose – most fans dont’ care what your hair looks like if your ERA is low or your batting average is high. But the policy is not prejudicial. A long haired white person will have to cut his hair, just like a dreadlocked black person. But this policy specifically prohibits braids. So that means, a long haired white woman won’t have to do anything with her hair, but a black woman with braids will have to.

                • December 1, 2015 - Reply

                  @LogicalLeopard

                  true but they probably have a policy against uncovered tattoos also, usually the better and higher paying jobs working with the public have these policy.

                  • December 1, 2015 - Reply

                    @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                    Maybe, and tattoo policy is another ball of wax. But as far as braids in your hair, that shouldn’t be a problem.

                    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

                      @LogicalLeopard

                      ok I agree it shouldn’t be a problem but I don’t own the company and if I “need” that job I’m cutting or unbraiding the hair so I can get the job and feed my family cause at the end of the day that’s the most important thing to me NOT A HAIRSTYLE, now that’s just me, and I will tell my children whether you feel like it’s right or wrong whether you agree with it or not you need a job cut or unbraid the d@mmmmm hair get the job until you can do better so you can get off of me and your mother and feed yourself. That’s how I roll.

                      • December 2, 2015 - Reply

                        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                        Hey, you do what you do. And I’m not knocking the person who you provided an example for. I’m just saying it’s unfair and needs to change. That’s it. I definitely believe in telling kids that there are many things you have to do, whether they are right or wrong. But I’m also going to tell them that some things are just inherently wrong. Some things you don’t have to put up with.

              • December 1, 2015 - Reply

                @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                Oh, and I’m sorry, I don’t live in NYC….I missed that earlier. Although I do comment on the Gotham website, because they have interesting articles.

                • December 1, 2015 - Reply

                  @LogicalLeopard

                  ok my bad!!!!! but you got my point right?

                  • December 2, 2015 - Reply

                    @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                    No, I get your point! I get all your points! I understand that sometimes people get in to fit in, but that doesn’t stop the situations from being wrong.

                    • December 2, 2015 - Reply

                      @LogicalLeopard

                      yep and people keep saying if you got your own business you can do what you want to do them, “wrong” if you want to make money, I have been in business and know people who are in business and are doing well but guess what when they contract to other company they have to adhere to the same rules and codes as that company employees do including dress codes [hairstyle etc.]. now if you are a street vender that’s a different story.

                      • December 2, 2015 - Reply

                        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                        My point is not just to buck the dress code. My point is to say that the dress code is UNFAIR. I don’t have problems with dress codes. Like I said about the baseball example, well, if you want to play for the Yankees, or….actually, I think the Blue Jays might have it as well, say bye bye to your haircut. It’s stupid, but it’s the rules. It probably hurts teams during free agency. I just read that David Price said earlier this year that he wouldn’t sign a long term deal with the Yankees because of the facial hair rule.
                        But at least that is FAIR. No one is losing out on it. There are probably just as many white guys who like to grow their hair long as their are black guys who like to grow their hair long, or in braids or dreads. They ALL have to cut it. But how many white women are getting braids versus black women? That’s unfair. And whether you get along to get along, or not, it’s still unfair.

                        • December 2, 2015 - Reply

                          @LogicalLeopard

                          I got it, I got your point and I agree with you.

          • December 1, 2015 - Reply

            @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

            Trueleterson, are we really GAINING anything or just complying with the puppeteer? We’ve been sacrificing since our ancestors sailed across the ocean. How much more sacrifices should we make? I believe Black people need to be put in a position to where we don’t have to beg them for anything. For example, my family member is a private contractor doctor. She calls the shots. She decides where to work, when to work, and what she will accept or not accept. If she goes to a place that doesn’t accept her (and it happens a lot) because of how she practices medicine, she keeps it moving. I know that may not be possible for everyone, but where does it end?

            • December 1, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              “but where does it end?” in reality it’s not going to ever end even if we black folk owned the world we still will have to have rule, regulations, standards of decency and codes of conduct and have the fortitude to enforce them or you will have disorder, dysfunction, and anarchy even CEO has to comply with the rules and regulation of the company even if they don’t particularly like them, even powerful politician have to comply with the laws of the country and codes of ethic and standards of decency, everybody can’t do everything they want to do. I use to be a business owner and manage a sub division for a company I retired from and black folk need to know and understand in this world white folks have to make changes and conform to codes rules and regulations that they sometimes disagree with if they want to work and maintain their lifestyle and even sub contractors have to comply with the same rules, code of conduct, code of dress and code of ethic that the employees have to comply with if they want to do business with that company, All Medical Doctors are licence by the State they practices in, I have a son that practices medicine [that’s why I am poor spent all my money helping him get thru med school] they have strict code of conduct, dress and rules and regulations that they must adhere to and if they keep getting bad reports they can potentially lose their licence to practice medicine. This all goes all the way back to the builders of the worlds first civilization 15.000 years age to ancient Egypt that was ruled by black people. Peace.

              • December 1, 2015 - Reply

                @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                Trueletterson, I understand that we live in a nation of laws (or that’s what we’ve been told) and that there will always be standards that we have to follow, but I believe hair should not be one of those standards. I believe that if braids are need, clean, and well-kept, there is no need to disregard them. We are discussing hair, not some unscrupulous behavior like no drinking or doing drugs on the job or no taking office supplies home or not wearing sexy or revealing clothes. I can see an issue if someone was wearing Mohawks or rainbow-colored hair . It’s unprofessional, but nice, neat, very attractive braids. Naw. Here’s my thing — if a person isn’t willing to conform, they should move on. No one should be held to standards they don’t believe in. Yes, physicians do have codes of ethics and such they must follow. Trust me, the corporations are running doctors away from their field because doctors like my family member (who works for herself) will not conform to the standards set by corporations that assist in killing, not healing patients. The medical profession is about death, whether it’s prescription drugs or treatments patients don’t need. It’s a one-size-fits-all. I’ve dealt with this issue personally when my mom was very ill. If we want to discuss ethical codes and people not following them, let’s begin by talking about police around this country. Even though there are rules and such, it appears not everyone has to follow them. Just saying. Again, we are taking about a nice beautiful hairstyle. I hear what you are saying, and actually agree with you about moral conduct and such, but I feel this young lady did what was right for her, and I applaud her.

                • December 2, 2015 - Reply

                  @Noirluv45

                  I agree with you!

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        I think if you have nice neat dreadlocks or braids then what’s the problem.Basically they want black people to conform their hair to fit white standards.

        • December 1, 2015 - Reply

          @Mrs.J

          I understand you, but just one problem you and I don’t hair, don’t make policy and don’t own the company.

          • December 1, 2015 - Reply

            @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

            True.That’s why blacks need to own more business and not discriminate against their own black people.

            • December 1, 2015 - Reply

              @Mrs.J

              Amen to that sister!

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @LogicalLeopard

      What’s the problem with an afro? Fair of tall hair? That it is terrifyingly distracting?

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @Claudette UK

        I think they’re big and they draw more attention. I wouldn’t say anything is “wrong” with it, though, and there’s certainly not a “problem” with them. That’s the way our hair naturally grows.

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @LogicalLeopard

      I hope that she gets legal counsel to take action.

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        I hope so too, because this is rank madness. There is nothing controversial or odd about braids. This is ridiculous and discriminatory.

        • December 1, 2015 - Reply

          @LogicalLeopard

          Exactly.

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        She shouldn’t waste her time doing that.She needs to go find a job that will take her.

        • December 1, 2015 - Reply

          @Mrs.J

          I respect your point of view.

          • December 1, 2015 - Reply

            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

            Thanx and I respect yours.I think her braids are nice and neat so I don’t see the problem.She doesn’t need to fight this she needs to go on to a different company.I saw the greatest thing when I went to a hospital for the first time yesterday.I usually go to a hospital somewhere else.I saw black people in scrubs and white robes.They were everywhere and my doctor was black and knew her job well.It was a beautiful sight to see.A door will open for her.

            • December 1, 2015 - Reply

              @Mrs.J

              You’re Welcome Sister.

              Well, Brothers and Sisters are masters of hospital work from doctors to nurses. One time, I went to the cafeteria to get some food from the hospital. The food was great, but it was expensive. LOL. The major point is that we don’t have to tolerate any disrespect against any black woman. In the long term, we can set up our own enterprises in a higher level, so such injustices won’t take place. Your story is certainly very powerful and it shows the massive compassion and determination found in our black people.

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @LogicalLeopard

      It’s interesting that you think braid extensions are more acceptable than an afro.

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @Pema

        Both should be accepted, but I can see how some people might have reservations about one rather than the other. Should those reservations be supported? Absolutely not. An Afro is simply the way that our hair grows out. I have a little one now. *L*

        • December 1, 2015 - Reply

          @LogicalLeopard

          Me too, LL.

    • December 2, 2015 - Reply

      @LogicalLeopard

      Really??? Discrimination based on afros is even MORE crazy! Braids are FAKE hair. Afros are the way out hair grows naturally. To me, it makes no sense to penalize people for that!

      • December 2, 2015 - Reply

        @Ph.D

        @logicalleopard:disqus…. oops! Sorry! I responded before I read the rest of your comments. My fault!!

      • December 2, 2015 - Reply

        @Ph.D

        As I stated above, I don’t think ANYONE should be penalized for wearing an Afro.

  3. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    ok I know y’all are going to hate me but you know me I got to drop some unemotional wisdom here, this is the deal if she didn’t or won’t remove the braids then “she really didn’t need the job”, under the law company’s are allowed to have dress code and hair styles falls under dress codes and like my late dad use to tell me when I was young and radical and always talking about my rights and what I won’t do and what “they” can’t do he said “boy if you don’t own nothing you can’t call no shots”, and like my late old aunt use to tell me she say “son sometimes you got to kiss some @$$ until you get able to kick some @$$”. Don’t hurt me now.

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

      I don’t believe her. What she posted as the “rejection letter” does not look official. No upstanding company writes acceptance nor rejection letters in that manner. She just wants attention. I am so tired US creating unreal situations just to keep up controversy.No one takes us seriously because of crap like this.

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @XYZ

        Your comment should read “I am so tired of some people” not US because I don’t know many black folks that try to keep up controversy by making up lies. It is very ignorant to make sweeping generalisations.

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @XYZ

        you are exactly right, I kinder thought so it really didn’t look official and hey really don’t have to tell you why they didn’t hire you, but the bottom line is if you want to work and need a job I don’t see any reasonable person letting a hair style prevent then from getting a job. Peace.

        • December 2, 2015 - Reply

          @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

          I don’t know why you assume that not wanting to work for a company that is openly hostile to you is unreasonable. If it wasn’t her hair it would probably be something else. The company using her hair as an excuse but any company that actually cares about diversity wouldn’t be so ignorant to assume that braids were not neat, professional, and contrary to a reasonable dress code in the first place.

          She dodged a bullet there.

          • December 2, 2015 - Reply

            @Reina Benoir

            “I don’t know why you assume that not wanting to work for a company that is openly hostile to you is unreasonable” no I do not think it’s unreasonable matter of fact I think it’s the wise thing to do if you have options but for me if it come down to a hairstyle and taking a job so I can eat to hell with the hairstyle I will take the job so I can eat, now that’s just me. It’s not the mission of a company to care about diversity they only care about profit “making money” that’s the reason they go into business, the only reason they act like they care about diversity [a word I hate} is they are force to act as if they care about diversity and the sooner black people realize this the sooner we will be on our way!

            • December 2, 2015 - Reply

              @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

              But your solution is no better. Basically your attitude seems to be that you should just suck it up and bend to dress codes based on fairly racist grooming standards and that we shouldn’t expect things to change.

              Well, no it’s not going to change if people just suck it up and say nothing. When people start letting companies know that they won’t put up with that kind of bigoted nonsense companies will change. I don’t care if they talk about diversity as a pretense so long as their actions make it clear that my skin and hair is not going to be a detriment to me.

              Nobody said anything about making them like us but entering a workplace that presumes there’s something wrong with you before you even walk in the door certainly isn’t going to do anything in the long run but put you in even more situations where you’re constantly allowing yourself to be disrespected in exchange for a check.

              • December 2, 2015 - Reply

                @Reina Benoir

                I understand where you are coming from but for me I don’t need no one white red or green no hairstyle or dress to authenticate or validate me, it’s more to me than a hairstyle, dress, car etc.. I don’t own a company or business [I use too] so if I go to a man and ask him for a job I need and a hairstyle is a impediment for me getting the job I want, I need, I am seeking I am getting rid of the hairstyle because a hairstyle is NOT more important to me than feeding and providing shelter for my children and family now that just me and I am not ashamed and makes no apology!

                • December 2, 2015 - Reply

                  @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                  1. It’s all well and good that you think this is a solution for you but it’ doesn’t address the larger issue for people overall and quite frankly I don’t think it’s fair to attempt tp make people feel as though they wanting autonomy over their hair is asking too much. It’s not petty it’s perfectly normal. Everyone does a little something to get by in the workplace but we’re the only ones being asked to forgo our natural textures in order to put chemicals on our scalps to mimic white people’s warped idea of what is presentable hair. Our hair texture is perfectly presentable and it’s time white people got over themselves.

                  Maybe you didn’t intend to imply that people are being petty by not wanting to acquiesce on such a demand but that’s how it comes across.

                  2. You might be asking for a job when you put in for a job but I am not. The interview process is not just to make sure you are a good fit with the company it is also to make sure the company is one with which you can deal which means scoping out their policies about your hair. My employer is not giving me anything nor are they doing me any favors so there is a limit to how much they are allowed to ask of me in exchange for a check and if they cannot deal with natural hair that is a problem. I don’t consider it petty to avoid such situations for one’s own sake.

                  • December 3, 2015 - Reply

                    @Reina Benoir

                    Reina first of all I appreciate the dialog, second thought I do understand where you are coming from as a women because hairstyle is so very important to women but for me as a man with the responsibility of a man I view it differently for instance, I am afraid of heights and after finishing technical college I had three job offer two were good comfortable indoor jobs that paid well with good benefits one was a job that occasionally required climbing 30, 40, 50 sometimes 100 foot poles but it paid the most and had the best benefits and retirement plan, although I was afraid of heights guess what because of my family I choose the job that paid the most with the better benefits and retirement plan and a company vehicle and with the advance in technology eventually they got rid of pole line, but still in this case the way I see is a person got two choices, if you don’t own “nothing” and you are in need for a job, you go to a company and “asking them” for a job, you apply, you do the interview, they tell you what’s required, they give you the rules, dress code, and code of conduct etc. at that time depending on your “need” either you take the job or you reject the job, but for me a hairstyle isn’t all that important to me [was when I was young but never have been in my adult life] so I will take the job until I can do better so I can provide for my family, and for me providing for my family is the most important thing to me, for me providing for my family far out weights fighting a insignificant cause now that’s just me. Keep fighting my friend. More power to you.

      • December 2, 2015 - Reply

        @XYZ

        It could be a small company. Also how is email not official communication?

  4. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    I’m sorry but I’m not really here for someone who is more concerned with a company that rejected her for what she perceives as discriminatory reasons. If the communication was real and legitimate why not share who it was from? Why not give Black folks the tools to be educated consumers and allow them to choose to reject this company vs. being concerned with them when they clearly don’t love you. As it stands, I’m not sure if I even believe her or if she was just seeking attention.

    On the other hand, I did a research project on workplace hair & law a few years ago and unless things have shifted, company policies that prohibit braids are generally not discriminatory unless they are race based.

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @T Love

      “I did a research project on workplace hair & law a few years ago and unless things have shifted, company policies that prohibit braids are generally not discriminatory unless they are race based.” from my experience in management and as a contract employer [union worker] I am pretty sure you are correct. Everything that goes against what we do, how we dress etc. is not discrimination, logic tells me if she really needed that job she would have unbraided that hair so due to the fact that she didn’t tells me she didn’t really need that job, tells me that her hair style was more important to her than a pay check.

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        Let me ask you. I assume when they hired her, she had braids. So now that the job is on the table, they turn around and reject her. Isn’t that suspect to you? If you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything. Maybe her rights were more important than a paycheck. Everyone isn’t a prostitute.

        • December 1, 2015 - Reply

          @Noirluv45

          this is suspect to me because after being in management for a long time I learned that on issue like this corporate America usually have all of the bases covered before they offer you a job usually they have already debated all of this, and they don’t have to give you a reason for not hiring you, that’s why I fine this very strange so to answer your question yes this seems suspect to me. “If you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything.” I feel you but for me a hair style is not all that important to me I have never let a hair style define me, me I would cut the hair and get the job so I can take care of my family, like my late old aunt told me she said “son sometimes you got to kiss some @$$ so you can be able to kick some @$$” and that sounds logical and common sense to me. “Maybe her rights were more important than a paycheck.” ok more power to her. Peace.

          • December 1, 2015 - Reply

            @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

            I hear what you are saying. My issue is it starts with hair, but ends where? For her, maybe it’s more about the principal of the matter than merely the money. I don’t know. I think the only way we can “kick some a$$” is to start our own businesses so that we don’t have to continuously be subject to the White man’s desires. Some of us are so tired of bowing down to him just because he doesn’t understand our beauty and culture. I know it’s hair, but that’s only the beginning. Thanks for answering my question, Trueletterson.

            • December 1, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              thank you and I feel you and somewhat agree with you but remember this if we had our own business and our nation we still will have to have and enforce codes of conduct, codes of dress, standards of decency, laws, rules and regulations some we want like some we will like but all are pillows of a civilized society. Peace.

              • December 1, 2015 - Reply

                @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                You’re welcome, and I feel what you are saying too. I hope with all the rules and regulations we have to follow that people will lighten up when it comes to Black women’s hair.

                • December 1, 2015 - Reply

                  @Noirluv45

                  but it’s not only black women hair it black men also they apply the same rules to black men wearing braids or dreadlocks so gender has nothing to do with it.

        • December 3, 2015 - Reply

          @Noirluv45

          you know what I forgot for the typical women hairstyle is more important to her than it is to the typical man, my bad.

          • December 3, 2015 - Reply

            @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

            You are so right, Trueletterson. You know us women and our hair. LOL.

            • December 3, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              yep you got that right, I forgot about that and that put a hold new light on things. LOL.

              • December 3, 2015 - Reply

                @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

                It sure does, doesn’t it?

    • December 2, 2015 - Reply

      @T Love

      She left the company name out not for their protection, but for hers. If she named them she would be blacklisted from jobs in the industry she just worked four years to get a degree in. She probably just wanted to vent and move on. Your reason for not believing her is asinine.

  5. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    She didn’t list the company’s name because she is lying. If she put a company name on the letter she will be sued for defamation. It does not even look official.

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @XYZ

      I agree with you, you are right we see this all the times on particularly black blogs targeting young blacks almost every week we see made up non constructive immature article sometimes with fictitious characters trying to steer up controversy and we wonder why the world do not take us seriously. I had thanksgiving dinner with family members and some other people and there were a Indian couple there with a young 3 year old boy and they were so proud that their 3 year old son could read at three old and was taking classes matter fact they said he had a class thanksgiving morning, I said that to say this black people don’t have a clue about what they are up against because they are too caught up into fighting something or somebody most of the times about something as trivial as a hair style or some rights they are not even prepared to take advantage of.

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        Of course, if after all that studying, his first employer tells him to shave his head because his dark bone straight hair is so different from the office culture standards, suddenly it doesn’t seem so trivial.

        • December 3, 2015 - Reply

          @parentk

          You shouldn’t be surprise by her stance. Mental slavery is written all over her comments.

        • December 5, 2015 - Reply

          @parentk

          Are you being sarcastic?….because @trueletterson is right on……Blacks have no clue what theyre up against…your comment is irrelevant/irreverent because that 3 year old will be doing the hiring in the future…probably the children of those BLM protesters….because his married and educated parents were busy teaching him how to read and taking him to classes at 3 years old and thereby teaching him how to dominate…think ‘others’ aren’t discriminated against?…how do they fight it?…by getting educated and married and then having children who they teach how to read by 3 years old and take to classes on Thanksgiving so he will grow up to dominate…..Do they protest? Nope that’s for the Blacks and when the noise dies down whatever spoils were achieved will be snatched up by the parents of that 3 year old who were too busy being educated and getting married and having children who they teach to read by 3 years old and take to classes on Thanksgiving so he will grow up to dominate and hire the children of those protesters who were too busy protesting/wasting time…imo….to get educated and married and teaching their children to read by 3 years old and taking them to classes on Thanksgiving so THEY can grow up to dominate and do the hiring. ….nope…Blacks have no clue.

          • December 5, 2015 - Reply

            @lis

            Of course you missed the sarcasm used to illustrate that there are American children of African descent who study just as hard and yet will encounter problems when searching for work. They did all the academic things expected of a student yet when they grow up to be a prospective employee, they will encounter ignorant people who are uncomfortable with the employee’s natural differences in appearance. These undereducated business owners/employers will make the employee expose themselves to caustic chemicals in order to fight the natural texture of their hair, making the employee feel that “different” is a synonym for “inferior”. Just so that the employer is comfortable, so that the employer doesn’t feel inadequate and insecure.

            The young lady’s braids are very orderly, groomed and neat. They don’t glow in the dark nor block the halls so no one can go past. If her claim is true, then the employer is a childish neurotic dunce.

            Sarcasm is not discernible by everyone, just as there are folks who can’t accept natural born differences.

            • December 8, 2015 - Reply

              @parentk

              Hmmm…..ok.

      • December 3, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        “and we wonder why the world do not take us seriously.”–Lol! The corner stone of mental slavery.

        Now all of your comments make sense.

  6. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    She is very humble Sister. Black women have been discriminated again based on sex, hair, and race for a long time. We should never stand for this. The gloves must be taken off in such instances. She has every right to get legal counsel, get the evidence or the documentation, and sue if she desires to. In fact, she should sue. Her hair in braids obviously will not cause a workplace distraction unless a person is a bigot or culturally insensitive. Also, we should advance our black image. Ain’t nothing wrong with our beautiful black. Our hair is wonderfully made. Our skin shines brighter than gold and our intellects are excellent examples of inguenity.

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      Perhaps I’m assuming too much, but they hired her with the braids. Yet again, White supremacy makes everyone a clone. We are not allowed our individuality, Truth. I can see if her hair was rainbow colored or outrageous, but braids are commonplace and can look very professional. They need to get their heads out their backsides and wake up. Everyone can’t be or doesn’t want to be like them.

      • December 1, 2015 - Reply

        @Noirluv45

        She was hired with her braids, so she definitely has a case. Yes, the system of white supremacy is a scourge that promotes lies and not the truth. Everyone can look like an Eurocentric clone. She looked not only professional. She is a very beautiful woman inside and out. It is an injustice for many Sisters to be treated like this. We love our image. We are not made in the white man’s image. We are made in the image of God and our Blackness is beautiful.

      • December 2, 2015 - Reply

        @Noirluv45

        Could be some crossing of wires somewhere between the HR department and the manager of the person she would be working under. Lord knows big companies have plenty of problems getting their shit together. Or she went into the interview with a twist out or braid out then they noticed she came back with braids.

        I still say she dodged a bullet. If they were going to have problems with her braids then there is probably other bullshit this company would expect her to do in order to not frighten the bigoted.

        • December 2, 2015 - Reply

          @Reina Benoir

          Agreed, Reina!

  7. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    She should of told us who the company was. If they discriminated against her, they could do it to somebody else. They are breaking the law and they should be named and shamed for shaming this young girl. I remember when this happened to me, I took them out as I needed a job to pay for things as a student. I had my natural hair in a bun but the manager wanted my hair straight and he pulled the only other black girl in that place who had a weave. He was like I want your hair like hers. I quit my job and I read him the riot act and threatened a lawsuit. The next day I got phone calls asking for me to take my job back with a pay rise and some very expensive vouchers, I accepted I was a student and I was broke and finding jobs were not easy. My manager in the end wanted to learn about black hiar so I taught him and he felt so bad he treated me the way he did. Still this company needs to be outed.

    • December 1, 2015 - Reply

      @mywordsaremypower

      It’s good that you had the courage to stand your ground. Had you not done they, you wouldn’t have come out better than before. Good for you! I agree that she should’ve outed this company. There’s no reason to protect it.

    • December 2, 2015 - Reply

      @mywordsaremypower

      Now this was a case of discrimination and you did the right thing and I would have supported 100 if you needed me.

  8. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    This is nothing new.I work at a stupid customer service job with Filipino’s.One of the managers told me my nails were to ghetto and I haven’t gotten them done in years.She would talk about all of the black girls hair too.She has long loud colored nails herself.This girl will go and find a company that wants her and she will be a great asset to that company.They want her to take out her braids so that the non black customers will feel better.

  9. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    Looks groomed, controlled and orderly to me.

  10. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    I am not surprised by this. She has a very good case. This is racist. There was a story last year about a young black woman who sued Hooters and won over hair. Her hair was straightened but she had some coppery red highlights. Her boss, a white woman, told her that black women shouldn’t have highlights in their hair because it wasn’t natural, i.e. they weren’t born with them. However, other white women at that Hooters location not only had highlights put in their hair that weren’t theirs naturally, but also dyed their hair funky colors like blue or pink. But for some reason that was acceptable. Anyway, she won her case. Clutch actually profiled her story. If the employer interviewed and hired her with braids, then she should be able to keep them. They should have told her at the interview that braids weren’t acceptable. They probably did that on purpose so they could be like: See, we want to hire POC but they won’t follow rules. Shady.

  11. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    If she doesn’t tell us the compost name then I really see no need for the article. We know coming company’s discriminate towards African-Americans. She isn’t solving anything by not naming the company. She doesn’t want to destroy their livelihood and company. Fuck that, they destroyed your integrity. Again, a woman that’s just want to point something out and not actually do anything about it.

  12. December 1, 2015 - Reply

    Is this legitimate or a hoax? Although I’m well aware that some ignorant people do see braids as “ghetto”, something seems odd about this. Maybe I’m being too cautious…

    If it’s legit, maybe she’s not revealing the name of this employer until she finds another job and is hired so that way any potential employers don’t see her as a possible liability or litigious. Regardless of the issue at hand, some employers might see her outspokenness and willingness to put a company on blast as a red flag. Sad but true.

  13. December 2, 2015 - Reply

    But…If that company has a policy against braids and she wants to work there she should comply…look if she went there with her natural texture out(whether twa or long natural hair) and it was neat and appropriate per company policy and they had a problem with her NATURAL Texture I would support 100…. but no one is born with braids…it is a manipulated style….she should know her audience so to speak…and I still say this even though I’m sure her hairdo would not impact her ability to do the job…but beggars can’t be choosers….she is not the owner.

    • December 2, 2015 - Reply

      @lis

      “but beggars can’t be choosers….she is not the owner.” just plain old logic, wisdom and good common sense!

  14. December 2, 2015 - Reply

    When I was hired for my corporate job, on the day that I was told “You’re hired” and before I started to sign any documents, I was given a list of their dress code to read over. As I sat in front of the interviewer and the job’s Human Resources rep. And I had to read it, right there. Then I was asked if any of these clothing options were a problem for me. All of this was done before I became an official employee. Fortunately for me, the ‘dress code’ was the standard, P.C. list that didn’t infringe on my rights.
    I’ve never heard of a situation where an employer hired a new person and told them (days later/a few hours later/a week later… who knows?) that they needed to change their hairstyle/choice in clothing. This… smells fishy. I mean, they must’ve seen her in her braids at one point. Possibly, during the job interview. If this company really wanted a non-braided individual for this job, then they could’ve had gone with a non-Black person, preferably a white person.
    IMHO, I think this is a hoax from a woman that needs attention. And it’s a damn shame because we’re living some turbulent times, when it comes to race relations (in any country) and there are some folks out there, who will use this to drum up some attention towards them.

  15. December 2, 2015 - Reply

    Hmmm I would like to know the full story.

    While I do not like this young woman being rejected for her choice of hairstyle, this just sounds as if there maybe more to the story.

    Hmmm perhaps she should seek legal advice. That being said each state has different laws as applied to hiring and labor. Federal law is more than clear, but one has to “prove up”.

    But for the company to “openly” state this is another matter. The company was more than comfortable making this statement, that shows they feel they are within their rights.

    What type of business, and what would have been her role within the business? That alone would determine the dress code, and if it is enforced.

    Did she know of this at the time of submitting the application?

    This is the key, the company’s comfort level. There is more to this.

  16. December 3, 2015 - Reply

    First, I agree that knowing the company name would be helpful because anyway you slice it one could successfully argue discrimination and if this company have these practices than a boycott is necessary. Secondly, how does her braids look unprofessional. Nothing about her hair screams unkempt. Honestly, she needs a great lawyer ASAP.

  17. December 3, 2015 - Reply

    If this is legit(I’ll with hold judgement) The way the note is phrased
    it seems to me like this may be a temp or contract agency that sends people out to
    differnet companies to work. THOSE comapnies don’t want braids. Also,
    seems to be one letter in a longer series of exchanges. Perhaps she
    interviewed without braids and then got them later?

  18. December 5, 2015 - Reply

    There are “conservative” braids, and then there’s “rebellious” braids. I don’t understand why some people are confused or taken aback by someone who has a tidy appearance and just happens to be wearing braids… Doesn’t make sense… but I’m not going to try to make myself smaller to understand someone else’s ignorance. Not tonight. lol

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