Yesha Callahan

Korean Beauty Supply Owner Calls Cops On Activists Directing Customers To Black Business

Screen Shot 2015-12-30 at 1.10.02 PMIt’s not enough to simply tell people to support black businesses. That’s why the Waxahachie Study Group, an organization of demonstrators in Texas inspired by the call of Minister Louis Farrakhan and the Justice or Else Movement decided to actually get out in the streets and direct consumers to black businesses and away from other stores they’d typically patronize.

That demonstration didn’t sit so well with a Korean beauty supply owner, however, who not only told one of the organizers what they were doing wasn’t right, but proceeded to call the cops on them. Here’s how the exchange developed:

Beauty supply owner: Why are you only doing this here? We did something wrong?

Demonstrator: No, we didn’t say you did anything wrong. We’re trying to enlighten our people and let them know that there is a black beauty supply that offers the same services so we are trying to redirect them to shop with their own people first before they shop with someone else.

Beauty supply owner: But I think this is not right.

Demonstrator: You think it’s not right for someone to support their own before they support someone else?

Yes, that’s exactly what the store owner thought, which is why he called an officer to remove the study group from supposedly disrupting his business. Funny enough, this is one instance in which the cops were actually on black folks’ side. When an officer arrived on the scene, the beauty supply owner tried to tell him he owned the entire parking lot, prompting the cop to ask again, “Sir, do you own the parking lot and collect rent from all the businesses?” That answer, obviously, was no, which is why the cop then explained to the business owner, “You pay rent for your one store. That doesn’t give you authority over the sidewalk and the parking lot.”

Translation: Have a seat.

Watch the interaction which begins around the four-minute mark. Kudos to the Waxahachie group for standing their ground.

  1. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    How would I feel as a business owner (Of any color)?

    I wouldn’t want someone standing in front of my spot, directing my customers somewhere else. No I wouldn’t like it one bit.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @mbeezy

      You may not like it, but it is not illegal. If your customers were that loyal, what difference would the protesters make?

      • December 30, 2015 - Reply

        @Catherine Banks

        I know it’s not legal. My statement was about how I would feel. I don’t want to confuse the issue here. Black businesses need support from their own community. There is no question about that.

        As a Black business owner I don’t want someone standing in front of my spot directing my customers somewhere else. That is my point.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @mbeezy

      Really? Do you think they care how the black customers , who foolishly shop there, feel when they treat them like thieves and trash?

      • December 30, 2015 - Reply

        @bluelight74

        I can’t speak for anyone’s feelings but my own. I shop where I am celebrated, not tolerated. That should be a general rule for how you spend your money.

        • December 30, 2015 - Reply

          @mbeezy

          Exactly, it’s pretty well known that black people are treated poorly in these places, so I don’t care how this guy feels. Added to this the way that their network has actively tried to freeze black people out of the business chain of providing product to black people! To h@ll with his feelings.

  2. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    Yessss!!!! We should all do this!!!!!!!!!!! We need to support our own!!!!!!!!!! I salute this man!

  3. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    Protesters have the legal right to free speech, but immigrants are taught that in America, people are equal under law regardless of race (and that’s it for the education on race in many ESL programs).

    Recent immigrants who work in urban stores believe that racial differentiation or talking about race in public is illegal because they hear on TV that it’s politically incorrect. But otherwise, they went to school overseas, they do not understand the historical context that the protests are taking place in.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Myra Esoteric

      I have to disagree wth you somewhat. As the daughter of immigrants and as someone who has worked with immigrants in the human services field, many immigrants, including black ones, are taught that American blacks are no good. Trust and believe, they do not see them as equal. Whites and other ethnicities go out of their way to tell immigrants to stay away from black people in general. Many immigrants come from countries where white is considered right, particularly Asian and Latino countries.

      • December 30, 2015 - Reply

        @shybookworm

        I have a friend whose parents are foreign-born, and she has such disdain for Black Americans, even though she was born in America. She’s very well connected with her heritages (she’s biracial). She had very bad experiences from Black Americans. She and her siblings were teased and condemned because her parents were foreign-born. I talk to her on the phone, and she’s very hostile. I’ve had to set her straight countless times. In fact, I’ve pulled away from her because I’M and American Black person and she talks as if she isn’t.

        • December 31, 2015 - Reply

          @Noirluv45

          Get her out of your life girl, you do not need that negativity.

          • January 1, 2016 - Reply

            @Staci Elle

            Amen, Staci! I’ve been pulling away from her because as you stated, I don’t need the negativity.

            • January 1, 2016 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              Happy new year sis

              • January 2, 2016 - Reply

                @Staci Elle

                Hey, sis! Happy New Year to you too.

            • January 1, 2016 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              Goodnight Sister Noirluv45

              Have a Great Weekend.

              God Bless You.

              • January 2, 2016 - Reply

                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                Good night, Truth. You have a wonderful New Year and weekend! God bless you too.

      • January 2, 2016 - Reply

        @shybookworm

        Thank you, shybookworm.

  4. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    I understand why the man was upset.I never really understood why black people go to those beauty supplies so much because they just watch you and think you will steal.Plus everything is overpriced.I get my shampoo and stuff from the drug store.I only visit a beauty supply sometimes.You are better off finding a black owned beauty supply or buying hair offline that you can use over and over again.

  5. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    Black people please google the name Latasha Harlins
    That is all

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @blogdiz

      OMG!!! I just googled her :((((((

      • December 30, 2015 - Reply

        @A.P.-CT

        It was a very sad story.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @blogdiz

      Yes, I remember when this happened! My God, Blogdiz, I’ve never forgotten that video! They let that murderer go! To make matters worst, it happened not too long after the Rodney King incident.

  6. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    The Brother in the video did everything justly and legal. Protesters have every right to protest. He defended his community and our black people with his statements. We need the further growth and development of our institutions. Every other ethnic group does this, but some falsely consider it taboo for black people to outwardly call for the patronizing of black businesses (by black people). Supporting our own deals with growing our enterprises, helping the poor in our community, and realizing that justice is not just about freedom. Justice is about a changing of society, so the masses of black people (not just the black rich) will benefit via economic, social, and political power. It is about using action to achieve our total destinies as black human beings and the end of oppression. That’s justice. I congratulate the Brother and the rest of the Waxahachie group for their actions.

  7. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    This brings me back to that one article years ago on here about the rise in black beauty store businesses and some random went off on me for saying that would be great.

    I really think there’s an effort to reclaim our own business with all the hair care out for us and the starting of black beauty supply businesses, I just hope not every line ‘sells out’ or every starter store gets crushed by competition.

  8. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    blogdiz..i remember when that happened to that little girl…this is what i have been wanting to hear…i am a black nail tech…let me rephrase a LICENSED nail tech and for the life of me i cannot get my own people to support me..i have 2 black clients and its a dam n shame….we need more black owned businesses…banks, grocery stores, clothing stores, nail salons, etc..not just rib shack joints, and liquor stores….we need black owned starbucks, cosi, the corner bakery, etc…..im not saying they dont exist all im saying is to support black owned business…we tend to turn our nose up ..not saying all….we have been here for 500+ years and its a shame that asians, latinos, etc come over here and open businesses and we dont.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @dogfish

      How is your business doing? What are you doing to market your business? My nail salon is Black owned and she is doing very well especially for being open only 2 years

      • December 30, 2015 - Reply

        @♎Lauren♎

        Hey i had a style seat page, flyers, passed out business cards adn even went to a lot of my co-workers at my full time job showed them my work and then offered a discount..they still said well i’ve been going to such and such for a while so i will stick with them…im fine with that. but dont say out of the same breath that you want to support black owned business…i have stopped providing nail services until i decide where i want to move to. I am currently in a small city in NC, but i am from DC but im looking into Atlanta. If you have any solutions please let me know and i will email you my email address..thanks

        • December 31, 2015 - Reply

          @dogfish

          I hate that people are acting like that towards you. I wish you the best of luck! Just keep moving forward!

        • January 1, 2016 - Reply

          @dogfish

          Sometimes rejection is Gods protection. It may be that moving to another location is where you will find your success. Hang in there

    • December 31, 2015 - Reply

      @dogfish

      That’s a totally shame.I think moving to Atl might be better for you.

    • December 31, 2015 - Reply

      @dogfish

      Where are you located? I drive from los angeles to long beach to go to my Black nail tech. Id love to find a Black nail tech in Los angeles so I wont have to go that far every time. You need to stand outside these Vietnamese nail shops and hand out cards lol. I hated going to them with their watered down products and rush jobs.

      • January 3, 2016 - Reply

        @Staci Elle

        Where do you go in LB? tbh i dont get my nails done much but when i do i either do it myself or go to the japanese nail salons because those designs are my favorite.

        • January 3, 2016 - Reply

          @Anonin

          I go to my homegirls house, she is licensed. If your close i ll give you the info.

          • January 3, 2016 - Reply

            @Staci Elle

            I’m in anaheim but i used to live in LB. does she have an instagram of her work?

            • January 3, 2016 - Reply

              @Anonin

              I ll ask her.

              • January 4, 2016 - Reply

                @Staci Elle

                thanks

  9. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    i can go on and on…BLACK FRIDAY…for example…was when slave owner sold slaves at a “discount.” GTFOH! and we are support other establishments on black friday nothing wrong with a discount…but we gotta support us…WE CANT WAIT for the WORLD to support, validate, or respect us if we dont do it..WE DONT LIVE FOR THE WORLD…People please lets work together for the best of US

  10. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    ok i promise last comment (lol) we do need more black owned suppliers because even though i dont support asian owned beauty stores, when they are black owned…my thing is asians still supply the hair..and in the nail industry…its rough…check out some of these black owned nail techs…just google…the nail bully, poochiez nails, tippie toes, nelles nails, polish and co.

  11. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    Oh puhleeze! The Koreans practically do the same thing to Black beauty supply owners if not worse. But when Koreans do it, it’s called “good business”.

    Watch the documentary on youtube called “Black Hair” by Aron Ranen. Basically when Black beauty supply owners order supplies from the supplier (who is always Korean 100% of the time), the Korean suppliers either stop selling to the black owner by saying the supply factory burned down (lie) or they mark up the prices so ridiculously high, the black owner is basically forced to shut down. Not only that, when a Black beauty supply store opens up, a Korean one seems to purposefully open up next door with prices so cheap, the black owner cannot compete. Some people (usually other Koreans and whites) say this is good business practice. I see it as a race-based monopoly. Last time I checked, monopolies are illegal.

    But it goes deeper. The Youtube documentary also explains that the Korean Wig Merchants Association struck a deal with the U.S. Government and the South Korea gov’t back in the 1960s to basically get a lock on the supply chain. The U.S. Gov’t worked in collusion with a foreign gov’t to basically more or less undermine the black beauty supply chain business. I can’t fault black people for not knowing about this when this deal went down b/c in the 1960s, black people were kinda concentrating on the Civil Rights movement……

    Try opening a tea and rice store in a Korean neighborhood as a black business owner and see how long you last. I guarantee that in no time, you will have to close down.

    So there ya go. For the Korean owner to call the police is utter nonsense. The Koreans beauty supply chain have been more or less getting away with the same tactics if not worse for decades. Black people should take the battle to Congress or the Senate to have that trade deal thrown out.

    Hey moderator, I did a double post b/c i couldn’t remember my password for Disqus. You can delete my post as guest. Thanks.

    • January 1, 2016 - Reply

      @Eyes Wide Shut

      Not only that, the beauty industry took a dive in the 90’s due Asian chop shops. They chopped the prices in half and imported horrible products that our country had to ban. The biggest damage done is by walmart. So before we start picketing small private businesses, you should really start with wslmart

  12. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    Good for him! They don’t care about us anyway. They just want our money.

  13. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    The Koreans run a multi billion dollar monopoly in the black hair care industry.
    They have amassed more wealth from the black dollar, than from their own.
    The brother is doing the exact same thing the Koreans did to us in BK, back in the 80s.
    They forced small black owned businesses out by flooding the city with products and hording distribution between themselves.
    Its about time for us, collectively, to stand up and take care of our own and stop stuffing other people’s pockets with our hard earned dollars.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Chazz A

      Amen. I mentioned in another thread a while back that I knew a Black family who opened a beauty supply store here in Bed Stuy. The wife told me they had a HELL of a time purchasing products from Korean distributors, just as Eyes Wide Shut mentions below. She even did a ton of research on natural hair care products for Black women, and her store was very modern looking with beautiful hardwood floors and nicely displayed merchandise (vs. the stocked to the ceiling, crowded mess in the Korean stores}. Eventually they went out of business, and a lot of it also had to do with Black customers (mostly women) questioning their prices-knowing damn well they don’t ask Koreans about their pricing-smh.

      After they closed I had been going to a Korean BSS near me on Fulton Street for years, simply out of convenience because they are outside the subway station. They are always friendly and helpful, etc. but a few months ago I noticed a smaller Black owned BSS across the street. The African lady who worked in there is also very friendly and helpful, and I make it my business to simply cross the street and patronize her store instead.

      • December 30, 2015 - Reply

        @vintage3000

        You are right on point with black people questioning prices and sometimes looking for a “hook Up”. Its good that you now have a choice on your purchases instead of being forced to spend your money supporting the Korean monopoly.
        They are very shrewd in terms of business practices. I asked a well spoken Korean corner store owner, why he chose to do business in my black neighborhood. I was not expecting the following reply. He said “because there is no competition, black people do not own many businesses, so they have to buy from us.”
        Although his arrogance pissed me off, I thanked the man for being honest.
        They hire their own, they control their own profits, they reinvest among themselves and most importantly, they never spend one dollar in our communities!

        Vintage3000, you know as well as I that we cannot continue to let other ethnic groups come into our city and rake in the dough like that!
        We (black people) need to get our ish together, do for us, by us and start taking care of our business!

        • December 30, 2015 - Reply

          @Chazz A

          WOW–so he was that honest, huh? That would have angered me also but at least he told the truth. And re: Black folks looking for ‘hook ups’ from Black business owners you are so right-my friend who owned the BSS is married to a handsome Black man, and he told her youngish Black women customers often flirted with him while asking for discounts, then would get insulted when he told them (politely) get to steppin’.

          There is an old school juke joint near me that takes up half a block, it’s been there for decades and I have often thought if I could afford it i would buy that place and turn it into something that provides a real amenity, like a large, clean laundromat, organic supermarket; something else. But to your point, yeah I’m also tired of the Dominican bodegas and supermarkets with overpriced, nasty food. Few years back I saw two white guys (I think Italian) who set up a produce stand near the bus stop in my old Jersey City neighborhood. Chazz you could smell those rotten vegetables from a block away, that didn’t stop happy older Black ladies (mostly West Indian) from buying that garbage while flirting with these white boys. Let me or you try to sell them spoiled food-we both know they would not touch it and if we tried to do that mess in an Italian neighborhood they would run us out. It’s tragic how we allow others to exploit us so often.

          • December 30, 2015 - Reply

            @vintage3000

            “Chazz you could smell those rotten vegetables from a block away”

            …Lol I know what you mean! that juke joint may be a diamond in the rough, plus Bed Stuy is a great location for an organic market (hipster dough).
            I’m all in when it comes to black entrepreneurs, no matter what business model they pursue.
            As for those nasty Bodegas, don’t get me hyped up over here lol

  14. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    Black folks around the world patronize the goods of other races & yet they treat us like dirt. In the US, black folks spend so much money in Asian owned beauty supply stores, nail salons, grocery stores & restaurants while few Asians patronize black owned businesses on the same scale. & yet in most of these stores, you’re followed around once you enter & you’re black cos they assume you’ll steal. Same story in Africa- the Chinese are practically running the economy in many African countries today. Most of these countries are importing nearly everything from China even toothpicks & Zimbabwe recently declared the Chinese Yuan as one of the official currencies in Zimbabwe! Meanwhile the favor has not been returned. Some Chinese even opened a restaurant in Kenya where they refused to serve Africans. Google it. If our forefathers/ mothers were able to boycott buses & walk in defense of their civil rights, surely, we can do more. Patronizing the businesses of people who don’t like you or care about you doesn’t even make sense.

  15. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    This is rare, but I’m going to wholeheartedly brag about Canada. Our black hair stores are run and patronized by black people. Maybe it’s because we make up a smaller percentage of the overall population so it’s locked down as more of a niche market, I don’t know, it could be anything. But what remains is the end result, which is, I’ve grown up in a cultural climate that has made it bizarre for non-blacks would corner the market on black hair goods. I hear about it all the time in the States, but it’s just not like that here. All of our stores are hair and beauty, though, is it different, there? How are you supposed to inquire about products if the people selling them don’t know what they are, let alone use them?

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Jo 'Mama' Besser

      Good to hear the same thing is happening to some extent in Africa and the Caribbean back home the major beauty products stores are owned by black people but Chinese wholesale/retail outlets are giving them stiff competition by stocking a wide range of beauty supply items in their general stores at cheaper prices they also form consortiums and import large shipments/containers in from China and keep locals out

      • December 31, 2015 - Reply

        @blogdiz

        see what im learning about the so called cheap prices..you have to be careful with that too.i personally believe some of that stuff is counterfeit. Anyone that has went on canal street in nyc would know they can counterfeit anything…

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Jo 'Mama' Besser

      I went to a small Caribbean island for vacay in Summer 2013. The only BSS I found was ran and owned by a black mother and daughter. I am so paranoid, I don’t even want to name the island (I don’t want Korean spies on this thread thinking they can up and go to the island thinking they can open shop and make a fortune – yeah, it’s that bad in the U.S.)

      As for Canada, I think the issue could be that b/c the Canadian government didn’t go out of its way to undermine a whole race by making back-room shady deals with foreign governments. Maybe that could be a big reason why the BSS industry in Canada is owned by blacks.

      When I went to grad school in a small state in the northeast, there was only one BSS in the whole state ran and owned by an African lady, who i patronized. The state literally has less than .005% black people, so that could be a reason why the Koreans didn’t come and run her out. Again, I don’t want to name the state on a public forum b/c I wanna go back to that state sometime next year and see homegirl doing her thing (LOL, but based on that demographic stat I gave, it shouldn’t be too hard to figure what state I am talking about).

      I heard the same nonsense is going on in the U.K. but instead of Koreans you have East Indians doing essentially the same. Uggghhhh.

    • December 31, 2015 - Reply

      @Jo 'Mama' Besser

      Where in Canada? I have seen in Toronto many BSS run by Asians, not Korean as in America but South Asians. Also most of the Wholesalers are still Asians so I am not seeing how Canada does better

  16. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    Black Lives matter support black businesses.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Mary Burrell

      Preach Sister.

  17. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    We ought to get tired of spending our hard earned money with folks who give zero damns about us coming into our communities just to take black folks money. They don’t even employ black people in their businesses. Black folks need to shut those Koreans down.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Mary Burrell

      Funny story: If you are ever in Brooklyn, check out the two coffee stores around Brooklyn College (although the neighborhood is predominantly black, the immediate area around the college is diverse). The two coffee stores are: Caffe Bene and Starbucks.

      FYI, Caffe Bene is a South Korean coffee store chain much like Starbucks. One day, I went into Caffe Bene to see what it was about (as I never heard about them before in my life). They opened right next to Starbucks (LOL, good luck with that!)

      When I 1st went in, I was amazed at the vast space and the big “Free wi-fi” sign. The space is big enough to hold multiple study sessions. But what smacked me in the face was the decorations on the wall written in Chinese and Korean. I was like “Pause”. The two baristas were Asian women. I walked out. I went home and had to look this company up and found out it’s a S. Korean enterprise.

      Starbucks, on the other hand, their baristas are every shade of the rainbow: black, white, Latino/Hispanic. I even saw one Asian female barista (although she had multiple piercings and tats – unlike the Caffe Bene crew).

      2 months later, I decided to check on Caffe Bene to see if they diversified their work team. NOPE. And guess what? There were only 2 customers in there. Meanwhile Starbucks, with their much smaller space, was packed and booming. (Yeah, I know Starbucks has received tons of criticism about being the big bad white corporation. But trust, they still do a lot better than other big white-owned companies out there).

      Lesson – speak with $$$. Don’t patronize these businesses. I doubt Caffe Bene will last much longer against Starbucks (IN A COLLEGE AREA, DESPITE HAVING MORE PASTRIES, A MUCH BIGGER SPACE AND FREE WI-FI)

      • December 31, 2015 - Reply

        @Eyes Wide Shut

        Same thing in some parts of DC…in Maryland there is a “soul food” restaurant that sell soul food and its Asian owned but black people serve the food..so you have to be careful of that too…I dont care lol i ask is this a black owned business.

      • December 31, 2015 - Reply

        @Eyes Wide Shut

        Exactly shut all those racist m’effers down. Making money off black folks and they buy houses in neighborhoods where they wouldn’t live near black folks. Black folks in the hood need to wake up. We need to have businesses for us by us.

  18. December 30, 2015 - Reply

    This brought a smile to my face.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @PrimmestPlum

      me 2. It was not that business owners day lol.

  19. December 31, 2015 - Reply

    Well if women were not so obsessed with mimicking Eurocentric/Asian hair, the East Asians and Asians would soon pull out.

    Black people; presumably mainly women, spend more money in the USA on hair products than on property investment. That is an embarrassment.

  20. December 31, 2015 - Reply

    TO THE PEOPLE THAT COMMENTED: if we had more people like you in our community i believe we would flourish even greatly so…i just wanted to say that…we need to talk more about this in our community…society is so celebrity obsessed….in our community we cant afford that…clutch if you are listening we need more posts like this

    • December 31, 2015 - Reply

      @dogfish

      Right on Sister.

  21. December 31, 2015 - Reply

    I hope Blacks around the US boycott Asian businesses. They the Asians boycott Black businesses. If you ever see Asians buying something from a Black-owned business take a picture of it. Too bad too many Blacks don’t realize that they are now 4th Class Citizens. As with Asians they are first class citizens with the highest income.

  22. December 31, 2015 - Reply

    This is one of the most powerful things I’ve ever seen.
    I usually buy my products online or shop at Hairizon Beauty in Durham, NC.

  23. December 31, 2015 - Reply

    Love it! Keep it up!

  24. December 31, 2015 - Reply

    I cracked up. I applaud his efforts. It really is a shame that Blacks in the U.S. have so little ownership in the black hair care industry. We give all this money to purchase these products but yet reap none of the financial benefits from all these millions in sales every year.

    • December 31, 2015 - Reply

      @bricktop_MelindaM

      Great Points

      We have incredible spending power. I hope that things change for the better where we not only create more enterprises, but we own more of our own resources. Power directly relates to ownership. The elders gave us blueprint. 2016 and beyond represent a great opportunity to cultivate and grow our institutions too.

      • December 31, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        I hear you.

  25. December 31, 2015 - Reply

    Im not mad at them, I do my best not to spend money with the Koreans because 90% of the Korean business owners I’ve come across can barely contain their disgust for Black people who patronize their businesses.

  26. January 1, 2016 - Reply

    I do not understand the battle of self disguise to hide behind a product that is label black beauty supplies.

  27. January 1, 2016 - Reply

    Those ASIANS hate us, they take our money and will follow you around the store too. Got they token african as a stock boy looking at us also. BLACK PPL wake up, stop giving are money to ppl who hate us.I try to buy black as much as possible.

  28. January 2, 2016 - Reply

    Oh HELL YEAH. I don’t buy anything Asian. No chicken wings, no dry cleaning, NARRY a damned thing. In fact, all you Negros that eat t American Deli PLEASE STOP. They don’t like us. The owner has said so. If you live in Atlanta, go to Jason at Wing Express, That BROTHA, DRED LOCK WEARING BROTHA! Has the best wings

  29. January 4, 2016 - Reply

    I love it.

  30. January 5, 2016 - Reply

    TOTALLY UNRELATED TO HAIR however this article caused me to do some research…Sylvia food ( infamous Harlem restaurant) asians have bought that company..they got the game on lock…source: transcultural marketing book page 359 “realizing the asian-american dream.” You can also google it too

  31. January 6, 2016 - Reply

    Aaand this is why both hair care lines I use are owned and operated by AAwomen…and one is manufactured and distributed 60 miles from where I live…and though I haven’t been to a bss in many years, if I should ever have the need, I am fortunate enough to live in a city with at least 4african owned,2 African American owned, as well as at least 3 black owned natural salons; 2 are east african owned, 1 AA owned…
    With the amount frivolous spending I do on cosmetics each month(after bills,savings, and investing, if course) it is unacceptable for me to not spend it within my own community..
    I’ve been hunting down black owned, independent cosmetic lines lately and I am happy I did… So in those days I am browsing lipstick just because, I hit iman, coloured Raine, K’ior(sp),and I had already unwitting purchase a few from nasty gal which happened to be owned and designed by a WOC…

    China also has a huge hand in the black hair care business. They literally have a choke hold on the manufacturing and distribution of hair extensions and I cringe when I think of how much money we have given them over the decades. It has definitely played a part in their current super power status as well as the catalyst for the financial relationship we have with them now. Bottle necking that cash flow SHOULD be easy enough though..

  32. January 25, 2016 - Reply

    I’m sick of the Asians and their beauty supply monopoly. Current I am writing a business plan to open a small beauty supply store that caters to women of color (not necessarily just black women). I’m sick of the mistreatment by them in their stores, how they follow you around, how they think they know better about which brand of hair braids better when they aren’t stylists, how they have cameras and metal detectors, etc…

    I also want to sell products made from women of color who are just starting out, make products from home and the like to help promote them more and get them exposure. The Asians come here open up a million nail shops and beauty supply stores, meanwhile they talking about you in Korean and stress you for a tip in cash only.

    However, it also starts within OUR community. Some Blacks are not very supportive in black owned businesses. They rather go to the Asian nail tech than someone of color or they rather go to the dusty looking Asian beauty store because they are cheaper and sell cheap as a quality weave/wigs.

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