Yesha Callahan

Tinashe: People Always Assume Light-Skinned Women Are Successful Because Of Their Complexion

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We talk a lot about how the world has some catching up to do when it comes to seeing past darker skin, but the flip side of that colorism issue is when a person of a lighter hue attains success, people tend to assume it’s because of their complexion, rather than their talent.

That’s an issue Tinashe touched on in a recent chat with XONecole. The 22-year-old singer has racked up quite a number of achievements in the last two years, including being a part of the three-person Janet Jackson tribute at the BET Awards, having Chris Brown star in her latest music video, and being asked by  Nicki Minaj to open for her Pink Print tour. But as Soraya Joseph unapologetically pointed out in her interview with Tinashe, plenty of people are asking how exactly the “2 On” singer got on — or better yet why.

Asked how she feels about people not being clear on how she made it in the industry, Tinashe said:

“It is clear to me, but people don’t take the time to do the research to try to get to know [me]. They just kind of take a look at me and form a perception of what they think it is. They probably assume like ‘Oh, she’s just a cute girl, she’s probably given these opportunities because of how she looks.’ I don’t know. But of course it bothers me.”

The issue of looks is a Pandora’s Box when it comes to the entertainment biz and Tinashe whose father is from Zimbabwe and whose mother is of Danish, Norwegian, and Irish descent. Asked whether she thinks her self-described cuteness is about looking young or having a certain look — you know the light-skinned, long-hair, petite, racially ambiguous look the music industry loves — she said:

“I think it’s a combination. I think it’s a ‘I look young, and sweet and I definitely don’t look like I’ve been through a bunch of sh-t.’

“I think being young is part of it. I think having any type of level of sexuality is part of it. If you do that, people want to take it and run with it and assume that’s all you’re about when it’s really just a level of what I’m about.

On where she thinks some of the skepticism and criticism comes from, Tinashe added:

“I think it comes from a place of there is only room for one. Or there is only room for two. Again, the way I see it, obviously, is if a Black girl is winning–whether she is lightskin, darkskin, or any type of shade in-between, that should be a win for the Black community, period. But it’s not necessarily always perceived as such. It’s like ‘Oh, she’s on the more lighter spectrum, so that is why she wins.’

“For me, I feel like I still have to represent the [Black] community. That has been what has been my struggle because people do feel like there is only room for one. There is a Beyoncé, there is a Rihanna, there is Zendaya, there is a Jourdan Dunn. There is a Black girl in all of these positions and we don’t need another one.

“It’s just kind of ridiculous because there are like a hundred blonde, White actresses and leading ladies. There are a hundred rappers that all virtually look the same, sound the same, and dress the same and no one cares. But for some reason, when it comes to young women, they want to pit them against each other. There can’t be room [for us all]. There can’t be five Black girls winning. It’s weird.”

Weird, indeed, and deep rooted. For Tinashe, though, the lack of support may have more to do with her being just another pop artist with trap music undertones in a time where a lot of us are begging for traditional R&B to come back strong. But there likely is some merit to Tinashe’s point that a lot of people refuse to support her simply because they think she got where she is based on looks alone, rather than any talent. What do you think? Have you been guilty of assuming a light-skinned woman attained success simply because of her looks?

  1. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    ??

  2. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    Yeah, it is about her looks, her body size, and her ambiguous tone of skin. So PLEASE, she needs to own up to it and admit that it’s fucked up, but the truth. People are not going to support her because there and always will be girls that will look like her to replace her. Women usually support women. Men want to jerk off to her women want someone they can relate to and she is not relatable.

  3. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    Colorism is a serious problem in the world. I don’t believe that most black people view every single light skinned person as having success by their skin complexion alone. Tinashe is a young woman. I heard of her a few months ago. Light skinned human beings do suffer racism, discrimination, and stereotypes. Yet, it is a fact, as documented by studies, that dark skinned people on average suffer more discrimination and racism. She does have talent, but the powers that be will prop people up irrespective of talent level. Her phenotype has been promoted for a long time. That is the mainstream industry. Black people collectively shouldn’t be blamed for all the mechanisms of the industry. I don’t believe that black people of any hue (who is talented, qualified, and have great determination) should be questioned of their work ethic. Black people in general want many gifted black musicians to express their talent to the world. The problem is that the oligarchy controls who will be utilized. Also, many black people of darker hues are restricted of acting roles constantly. Many films have been whitewashed for years and decades. There is light privilege in society and the skeptics have to realize that. We want any black person of diverse hues to be free and to have justice.

    At the end of the day, regardless if we are light, brown, or dark, we face the same problem, and we want the same goal (which is freedom, justice, and equality for all black people). We are one black people. We are one.

    • December 24, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      ??

      • December 24, 2015 - Reply

        @Noirluv45

        Thank you Sister.

        • December 24, 2015 - Reply

          @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

          You are always welcome, Truth.

    • December 24, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      WELL said; we have a BADDDDD case of it here in the good ole U.S. of A (colorism & other superficialities (good hair, etc.)).

      • December 24, 2015 - Reply

        @BlackGlamour

        Exactly. There is a serious problem in Western society where colorist views are prevalent. One good news is that Sister Lupita has done a lot to fight back against the evil of colorism and other superficialities. Yes, there is no such thing as “good” hair. Hair is Hair. Black women have every right to rock their hair as they see fit.

        • December 24, 2015 - Reply

          @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

          Well said; and I’m thinking it stemmed from slavery (house negros vs. field negros), and the message that if you’re light you’re all right and if you’re black, get back.

          • December 24, 2015 - Reply

            @BlackGlamour

            I agree with you Sister. It certainly has been going on since slavery. Many European Spaniards did a racist class caste system (centuries ago) where the peninsulares were on top and black people were on the bottom of the class system. That same colorist system exists in our generation albeit in a different form. That is the light privilege. The paper bag test existed back in the day too. We know what that is. Therefore, we are in a fight for mental liberation not just physical liberation.

          • December 25, 2015 - Reply

            @BlackGlamour

            BlackGlamour, your comment reminded me of what Muhammad Ali said, “Devils’ food cake was the dark cake, and angel food cake was the white cake.”

            • December 25, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              yep, that’s how the world views anything dark as evil (african americans with dark skin, black cats, etc.) and anything light as pure or angelic (whites, anyone having light skin).

            • December 25, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              Devils Food cake is my favorite though. It never occurred to me that the dark chocolate cake would be associated with the devil and the angels food cake which is bland and boring. The rich chocolate goodness of devils food cake. I had never heard of that quote from Ali before by the way.

  4. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    I’m out of the loop because I’m one of those lovers of traditional R&B, so I don’t even know who this young lady is, but it’s very naive to believe that being light, especially if one is racial ambiguous, isn’t in! It’s all over the place. Perhaps this young lady is talented and got her merits based on her talent. I don’t know, and really have no interest in even checking her out. Colorism, however, isn’t her fault. It’s be around long before we were born. I think this young lady and others need to acknowledge that they get a thumbs up from the industry, more so than “regular” looking Black women. That’s just a fact.

    • December 24, 2015 - Reply

      @Noirluv45

      To be honest, I only seen one video of her on Bounce TV. I heard of her name, but she’s a very young woman.

      • December 24, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        You’re way ahead of me, Truth. LOL! I might break down and check her out on youtube. What happened to the Patti’s, Aretha’s, Evelyn Champagne King’s, the Emotions, etc?

        • December 24, 2015 - Reply

          @Noirluv45

          Good Afternoon Sister.

          We live in a different time Sister. A lot of new artists are some folks that even I haven’t heard of. Slang constantly evolves too. I heard of new slang words like A1 and Keep it 100. Artists like Patti, Evelyn Champagne King, the Emotions, Aretha, etc. aren’t here in a massive level for many reasons. Some artists today want to rely more on technology than on hard work plus developing their craft.

          • December 25, 2015 - Reply

            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

            Sadly, we do live in a different day and time. In fact, if Patti, Aretha and nem came out today, they wouldn’t even get airplay. Isn’t that pathetic?! You know, when you mentioned technology, I thought of Roger and Zapp. He used technology, but there was that talented foundation he had. That’s what’s lacking today. Like you said, they don’t develop their craft. People like Ray Charles, MJ, Prince, James Brown, etc. knew music/their craft. Great points, Truth.

            • December 25, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              I agree with you Sister. A lot of young people have grown up not even listening to the classics from Patti, Aretha, Ray Charles, etc.. You made an excellent point about Roger and Zapp. Roger was an established artist long before he used his device. Roger was always a legend before the 1980’s. That is why I do believe in investments in the arts and music among schools, so kids, who want to be musicians, can see the beauty of music. All of the artists that you have listed worked hard, sacrificed, practiced constantly, mastered notes, and learned about the diversity of instruments. A strong foundation is always key for the development of our culture. Music is one gift, out of many, from our people. Have a Blessed Day Sister.

              • December 30, 2015 - Reply

                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                Right on, Truth. The strong foundation of knowing their craft is what makes them legends. Decades later, their music still sounds good. Many in this generation haven’t listened to the greats, and it’s so sad. Some say, “Those were the old days.” I say, “So what?” Do they understand how much they can learn from the greats of old? That’s like saying that people can’t learn from the great artist, musicians, and writers of the past. We study to learn for the future. They are missing out on so much!

                • December 30, 2015 - Reply

                  @Noirluv45

                  Preach Sister,

                  They certainly are missing out on so much Sister. I have noticed that the legends from back in the day took their time to create their classics. Aretha Franklin perfected her voice and Donna Summer expressed great lyrics in her songs too. The Emotions, the Temptations, the Four Tops, etc. were meticulous in how they expressed themselves. That discipline should be advanced today by every current musician now. Some young people do have talent like Monica, Jazmine Sullian, Melanie Fiona, etc. Then, other artists today let’s just say are different. We know their names. LOL. The youth should study the greats. Architects study patterns of buildings from centuries ago and artists should learn lessons from the past.

                  • December 30, 2015 - Reply

                    @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                    Truth, you’re right. They were very meticulous and it reflects the record companies as well. Today, these record companies couldn’t care less about the quality of music that comes out as long as the music sells. They’ve gotten sloppy. Sloppiness also reflects the days and time were are in all the way around. Company customer service sucks. Some don’t care what they sell, the workers are lazy, and how many of them treat their customers would, back in the day, cause the company to close. You mentioned how music classes have been taken away from schools. That was a huge downfall. It makes sense to study the greats from the past so that we have a standard for the present. It’s common sense, isn’t it?

                    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

                      @Noirluv45

                      Good Afternoon Sister Noirluv45

                      It is certainly common sense to invest in music and art classes in schools. Studies readily document how music and art can improve intellect, creativity, and human emotions. That is why commercials promote music in schools constantly. You have made great pints about the record companies today. They are lackadaisical in promoting artists. They desire profit above all else irrespective of the talent of the artist. They have no choice, but to promote some talented people, but the masses of mainstream artists today promote the same old things or some them outright glamorize evils in their music that lacks real creativity. Some of these companies even want more power. Motown back then was created efficiently like a family and music was advanced with great discipline. That is why there should be a renaissance of quality music in a mass scale. People have every right to express how they feel not what corporate heads want them to show. In essence, we are fighting for the growth of our black musical culture.

                      • December 30, 2015 - Reply

                        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                        Good afternoon, brother. You said it all. Music in schools is imperative to bringing out true talent, not some pseudo mess like we hear today. I saw some youtube videos of young Black men and women playing classical music. In fact, there are these classically trained brothers who play classical violin. If you haven’t already, check out the youtube video, “Black Violin.” I love it when we move outside the expected box and venture into things other aspects of music. I truly believe that there isn’t any field that Blacks have not excelled in. What say you?

                        • December 30, 2015 - Reply

                          @Noirluv45

                          Great Words Sister.

                          When black people are given an opportunity, we excel. That’s part of our history. So, it is wonderful for black people to play the classical violin. Music in schools is great since music can increase human creativity and music is just fun to do. Music is exciting and we all heard tons of music. Also, I just recently saw a video called “Black Violin” a few minutes ago. It is is very instructive and the artists love what they are doing. It is part of our culture to think outside of the box. Many of our people are stunt people, skiers, sci fi authors, explorers, computer engineers, etc.

            • December 25, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              Do people even use their vocal chords to sing anymore? Technology is what makes the sounds and we get the stuff we listen to now.

              • December 30, 2015 - Reply

                @Mary Burrell

                Girl, I don’t think so, and when they do find their vocal cords, the sounds that come out are mediocre. Everyone sounds the same, Mary.

            • December 29, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              everyone loves Trap Music like Future, Fetty Wap, Gucci Mane, etc they encourage robbing selling dope and killing people and everybody love them even people older than me into them,,,I blame the elders for this.

              • December 30, 2015 - Reply

                @AkuAndoryū Tru-Dru Harrison

                SMH. I hear you about the elders. They are supposed to set examples for youth, but many fail to do so.

          • December 25, 2015 - Reply

            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

            You summed it up.

            • December 25, 2015 - Reply

              @Mahogany

              Thank you Sister. Enjoy your Day.

        • December 25, 2015 - Reply

          @Noirluv45

          There are no more artists like those you mentioned. The music industry has evolved into something I no longer recognize.

          • December 30, 2015 - Reply

            @Mary Burrell

            You are so right, Mary. I don’t recognize it either.

        • December 25, 2015 - Reply

          @Noirluv45

          They went out with the times. Back in the day the majority of artists and bands had their own sound. When you heard the music you automatically knew who it was. It was the same with early rap music. Now everybody sounds like everybody else.

          • December 30, 2015 - Reply

            @paintgurl40

            Ohhh, Paintgurl, I’ve said that countless times. You knew one artist from the next. You could hear the first note and you knew who was singing for playing. No cookie cutters back then. OMGosh, everyone sounds alike. There’s no originality anymore. Sadly, the artists mentioned did go out with the times. Thankfully, there are still some of us who appreciate them long after their popularity ended.

    • December 24, 2015 - Reply

      @Noirluv45

      u and me both, i know of some but her and a slew of others i don’t know about and am not trying to find out, they aren’t truly artists, they are in it for the perks of it (money, notoriety, etc.), not for the love of it (music).

    • December 24, 2015 - Reply

      @Noirluv45

      they all know this trust me Noirluv45, I have a young bi racial member of my family who admitted that she use her skin color to her advantage when ever she can.

      • December 24, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        I agree.

      • December 25, 2015 - Reply

        @trueletterson*vwfone@gmail.com

        Oh, yes, they sure do know it.

  5. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    I agree with Tinashe on most of what she said, but I think if she looks around, most of her contemporaries are light skin or redbone–the real successful ones, that is. I just spent a few minutes trying to name brown or dark-skinned female pop stars who are on the top 40 charts, and they’re all white or light skinned. I feel that the R&B charts are maybe better–Sevyn Streeter, Fantasia, Jazmine Sullivan, etc. At the end of the day, she’s right–we’re all black, but she does need to acknowledge that colorism is unfortunately alive and well in the entertainment industry.That’s not to say that certain light skinned singers aren’t talented–they are–but I think others are actually given a pass because they have more “desirable” looks. To be honest, though, sometimes I think certain artists are popular because they’re willing to be hypersexual in the way they perform on stage or the way they dress or in the lyrics they sing.

    • December 24, 2015 - Reply

      @shybookworm

      She may claim Black, but she’s actually mixed. The industry knows that too. She has “the look” and racial makeup the industry likes.

      • December 24, 2015 - Reply

        @Noirluv45

        Exactly! To the industry, she isn’t really black. She’s got just enough black to make her edgy and urban but the looks that make her acceptable to pop mainstream (i.e. white America).

        It’s easy for her to make the statements she made because she’s not on the negative end of colorism. Of course she feels her talent got her there, etc etc. Who would ever say “yes, I’m famous because I’m cute and light skinned in a color struck society” I’m not saying she’s not talented (although I’ve never heard anything from her, not my type of music) but she’s naive to think that her looks didn’t play a role in where she is today. I’m sure she wouldn’t be where she is now if she were Ledisi’s complexion.

        • December 25, 2015 - Reply

          @FragranceObsessed

          Yes!

  6. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    Ive never heard of this chicks music. so no comment on that but she’s not just light skinned she’s bi racial which yt prefers over black people of ANY complexion.

  7. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    Erm okay whatever you say you Janet Jackson counterfeit. I can see why she thinks it’s because of her talent and it can be annoying if people only point out your skintone and not your merit. However she should fully well know this is an issue but then again she is mixed race (white mother, black father) so this concept is new to her perhaps. It is very ignorant of her to dismiss the reason why people assume it’s down to her skintone. Colourism is an issue with black people as well as other races all around this globe. I have met a few light mixed raced girls and even light skinned girls who like to ignore the fact our darker skinned sisters are treated less then us. I hate when I see people dismiss a strong black female like Serena Williams and hype up someone like Beyonce, I know they are in two different worlds but it still applies to this. I don’t like her one bit she seems to always be very obnoxious and unaware of anything really and truly. She does not represent black women one bit. This issue is everywhere and she is trying to play victim which I find to often with light skinned women(again I am one myself). It is not her fault she is mixed but don’t then ignore the issue by making another non-existent issue out of it, stop being so basic woman and start to actually learn and think. When privileged people complain it can leave a nasty impact on those who are not so fortunate.

    • December 24, 2015 - Reply

      @mywordsaremypower

      Preach Sister.

      • December 24, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        Just doing my bit as always.

  8. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    Just the same as in acting, if you look like Halle Barry or Paula Patton you’ll go far and/or be put on a pedestal, but if you look like Angela Bassett or say Cecily Tyson (in her younger days) you won’t quite go that far, and it’s sad. If you’re deemed too ethnic you won’t get the shine that you would “if” you get your nose fixed, skin bleached, or are deemed “exotic” (aka biracial). . . . Sadly we live in a world that determines your worth by what you look like, not by your abilities or the content of your character

    • December 24, 2015 - Reply

      @BlackGlamour

      Amen.

  9. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    This is the FIRST time I’ve ever seen her. I’ve heard the “music” on the radio but never saw her until this article and I thought she was mediocre at best. Looks had to have propelled her. Should just admit that it certainly didn’t hurt to be the “acceptable” skin tone for successful females in the music industry (these days).

  10. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    It seems to me the most successful black women are deep brown or dark. Oprah anyone?

    • December 24, 2015 - Reply

      @Crmy Coco

      Perhaps elsewhere, but not in the music industry.

  11. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    yea that’s what they say and thinks, as well as light skinned men are successful because of their proximity to white people and white people are more comfortable around light skinned black people because of their proximity to white people.

  12. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    No, I have never assumed that a light skinned woman’s successful was solely based on her complexion, because if you are a wildly successful person you have more tricks in your hat to maintain the level of success than relying on your skin complexion solely…i.e. Beyonce. However, the way you look and how others view you gets you into the door over other people whether if that is based on your complexion, age, appearance, race, etc. So this is a two-fold issue, one based on colorism, lack of equal representation of all black women, and racism in the entertainment industry. I am closer to Tinashe’s shade so I wouldn’t want anyone to assume that I am only succeeding based on my hue, however, we have to be honest and say that colorism and complexion does play a part on how quickly and far you advance in certain industries particularly those industries that is based around image and how other people see you and react to you. I have seen this myself in my everyday life how the ugliness of colorism works. So it plays a part in society from seeing mainly light skin representation in the media or stopping browner and darker skin black women from getting into the club. So burying your head in the sand and saying light skinned privilege doesn’t exist would be a bold face lie, especially in the music and entertainment industry where the lighter, the brighter, and whiter the better is REGULARLY practiced. So I get some of her points but I feel like she is still dancing around the elephant in the room.

  13. December 24, 2015 - Reply

    Or maybe its because she’s mediocre….

    • December 25, 2015 - Reply

      @Allie

      She absolutely is. People who call her talented clearly don’t know what talent looks like.

  14. December 25, 2015 - Reply

    Never heard of her but she is very naive today young women who look like her do get special preference. That is just how it works in the world today.

  15. December 25, 2015 - Reply

    She is very young and many times children of biracial unions don’t know about the struggle of non mixed race black people.

    • December 26, 2015 - Reply

      @Mary Burrell

      I think many know but don’t really want to know. If you know what I mean. She isn’t that young. She’s 22. That’s old enough to be a college graduate. She would know the deal if she really wanted to.

  16. December 25, 2015 - Reply

    There was an Unsung episode about Escape. The Notorious B.I.G went on a radio show and said they were all ugly and he wouldn’t fcuk them if they were the last women on earth. Now as big and ugly as he was, the fact that he said it got the music execs to make Escape look more “feminine and sexy”. That’s how it is in the music industry when it comes down to women: “Are you f**kable?” Which is pretty pathetic.

    I saw the 2 On video. I saw a biracial chick looking “tomboy sexy”, gyrating and singing with the help of auto-tune to an easily forgettable song. Nothing spectacular there. Nothing that stood out and grabbed my attention. She’s just mediocre compared to Elle Varner, Chrisette Michelle, Ledisi, Jasmine Sullivan. Those women actually sing and write their own songs. Even though K Michelle has a shaky reputation, she’s really talented.

    • December 25, 2015 - Reply

      @paintgurl40

      And I never understood how somebody was wanting to do Notorious BIG! He was not an attractive fellow.

      • December 30, 2015 - Reply

        @Mary Burrell

        He really wasn’t. It was probably his personality and his fame that helped him out. Or maybe just the fame.

  17. December 26, 2015 - Reply

    Harpo who dis woman?

  18. December 26, 2015 - Reply

    Someone needs to get over themselves or at least get new PR people who understand that tone deaf, braggy and entitled interviews like this are hardly the way to endear oneself to fans
    Sade, Elle Varner, Mariah Carey, Emile Sande are just a few examples of biracial artists whose looks may have helped them but at the end of the day no one questioned their right to be where they are as they had thier own distinctive sound
    This lady is a cookie cutter average entertainer , that is more hype than substance

    • December 27, 2015 - Reply

      @naughtycorner

      Great point

  19. December 27, 2015 - Reply

    I’m not a huge fan of hers but I do think she is somewhat talented (when compared to other young pop artists who fit this mold) and deserves some credit. Seeing that most people are not aware of her credentials, let’s begin:
    -Talented dancer in different styles from a very young age
    -She has produced two entire mixtapes in her bedroom studio using music production software (Logic Pro) she taught herself how to use through YouTube tutorials.
    -She has filmed and edited some of her music videos, again using self-taught video production/editing software (Final Cut Pro).
    Granted, this level of participation in production took place before her record label took over. Also, I, like many people who have listened to her mixtapes and debut album, feel as though her most famous songs do not do her any justice. The record label definitely managed to shift her sound into a more mainstream, pop aesthetic that even Chris Brown can jump onto.

    With that being said, I wholeheartedly agree with the sentiments of the other comments. I, as a fellow Zimbabwean, disagree with her ignorance regarding the influence of colourism on her progression in the music industry. Even in Zimbabwe, colourism exists, and she must be aware that even her relatively small fan base in Zimbabwe pays attention to her fame in another country because she fits the industry’s appearance demands.

    • December 27, 2015 - Reply

      @Kuzivakwashe

      So you’re saying that you Zim folk are only interested in her because of her colour regardless of her part Zim heritage? Interesting. I’m Naijan and we follow the careers of our folk worldwide regardless of colour or ethnic group, whether or not they’re part or full.

    • December 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Kuzivakwashe

      I actually didn’t know all of that. I misjudged her based off of that 2 On video.

      • December 30, 2015 - Reply

        @paintgurl40

        I didn’t know all of that information either Sister.

  20. December 28, 2015 - Reply

    I try to read the comments but Clutch keeps redirecting me to spammy ass sites smh

  21. December 29, 2015 - Reply

    She’s absolutely right. …about everyone, including Blacks ,believing there can be only 1 Black woman this or only 1 Black woman that and pit them against each other, while every other group is left alone to be as mediocre and as numerous as they can be….As for the other issue..maybe….As for Tinashe, from what I’ve seen of her, looks might have played a part because I personally do not enjoy her singing or dancing.

  22. January 3, 2016 - Reply

    Colorism is just plain old race prejudice in disguise. It’s not about the shade of Black skin. It’s about racist people and self-hating Black people favoring Black people, particular only Black females, whose appearance screams at the world “I’M NOT FULL BLACK!!!!”

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