Yesha Callahan

Lisa Raye’s Film On Skin Lightening Makes Its Television Debut In 2016

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The LisaRaye McCoy and Avery O. Williams directed “Skinned” was nominated as one of the best independent feature films to be screened at the Bronze Lens Film Festival in Atlanta, Georgia this past November. The film, which tells the story of Jolie, a young woman so uncomfortable in her own skin that she turns to skin lightening creams to alter her complexion, will make its U.S. television premier debut on TV One during the first quarter of 2016.

Skinned tackles the issues of colorism and self-acceptance head on in just under an hour and a half. Due to her misconceptions about beauty the film’s main character Jolie bleaches her skin only to discover years later than her usage of bleaching creams, which often contain harmful chemicals, have resulted in health complications. With the assistance of a psychiatrist, she journeys back to where it all began to face her demons in an effort to sustain her future.

For more information, visit www.skinnedmovie.com and stay tuned for an official TV One premiere date.

  1. December 14, 2015 - Reply

    The trailer is provocative. We have to discuss about colorism and other evils if we want to experience total liberation as black people.

    • December 14, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      Preach. I’ll be watching once it comes on tvone. Love me some van vicker too ?

      • December 14, 2015 - Reply

        @Mahogany

        I love TVOne. It is one of the few channels that I do watch on cable like Bravo Black, etc.

      • December 14, 2015 - Reply

        @Mahogany

        Lol. What West African woman doesn’t? Sigh…getting me all nostalgic for home and Nollywood.

        • December 15, 2015 - Reply

          @AfroCapricornette

          LOL.

      • December 15, 2015 - Reply

        @Mahogany

        I’ve never heard of him, but I will be checking him out.

      • December 15, 2015 - Reply

        @Mahogany

        I bet Van will cry in this movie too.

    • December 15, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      In addition to liberation for black people, we need liberation for women. Women are fainting in public and damaging internal organs waist training and women are dying from butt enhancements. Skin lightening, which can damage the skin, is less deadly than some of the other things women do to “look good.”

      • December 15, 2015 - Reply

        @Lelani

        I do agree with that liberation should be for women too. Anyone who enacted illegal surgeries that have damaged and even killed women should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. We want society to promote the concept of self-love more.

        • December 15, 2015 - Reply

          @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

          Thank you. A cultural shift will take place, when women are truly free.

          • December 15, 2015 - Reply

            @Lelani

            Exactly. No one is free truly unless all women are free indeed.

  2. December 14, 2015 - Reply

    Self hate is one of the most devastating issues relating to skin tone, that continues to haunt black people to this day. We must deal with these issues in an honest, open minded approach in order to move beyond it.
    The film should be very interesting in deed.

    • December 14, 2015 - Reply

      @Chazz A

      I agree with you.

      • December 14, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        I don’t watch much Television these days, but I will tune in to this program for sure.

        • December 14, 2015 - Reply

          @Chazz A

          I heard of the trailer before. I haven’t seen the movie before.

  3. December 14, 2015 - Reply

    Blah, blah, blah.
    Mixed people are beatiful.
    Blah, blah, blah.
    The lighter the better.
    The starighter my hair appears the more I will be accepted.

    Same ole, same ole. As an African-American I am offended that more and more black people think this way. How are we suppose to start/have a revolution if most black people would rather look white? Terrible

    • December 15, 2015 - Reply

      @jay@cha

      We have to search deep and hold ourselves….and our ‘heroes’ who perpetuate this stereotype over and over and imbed it into our psyches accountable.
      Let’s call out Prince, Michael Jackson, Michael Jordan, Quincy Jones and every other atlete and entertainer who contributed and still contributes to this type of festering self hatred

  4. December 15, 2015 - Reply

    Guess I will make Google my friend and see who Van Vicker is.

    • December 15, 2015 - Reply

      @Mary Burrell

      LOL. I know, huh, Mary. 🙂

      • December 15, 2015 - Reply

        @Noirluv45

        Good Afternoon Sister.

        LOL. You can look at Van Vicker while I look at Lauryn Hill (as in her music collection. ;).

      • December 15, 2015 - Reply

        @Noirluv45

        ? lol

    • December 16, 2015 - Reply

      @Mary Burrell

      Google won’t really tell you much apart from his bio lol. Just head on to YT and see if you can watch some Nollywood/Ghollywood movies.

  5. December 15, 2015 - Reply

    Women and the quest for “beauty” is a complicated issue. I think that some in the black community are overly concerned with skin lightening as a racial issue. It’s a bit more complex than that. Women are constantly doing things to alter their bodies in a quest for the ever elusive beauty. Butt enhancements, waxing, collagen injections, wrinkle fillers, hair dyes/ weaves, waist training and all forms of plastic surgery. Some women are even getting eyebrows tattooed on their faces. The list of things that women do to modify their bodies, some painful, but women do them because society pressures women to be beautiful. I think skin lightening is more of a gender issue than a race issue. A woman who bleaches her skin is no more self hating than a woman who gets a complete stranger to wax hair off her most private parts, aka a Brazilian wax.

    • December 16, 2015 - Reply

      @Lelani

      I mean waxing is not considered “self-hate” the way bleaching is. Whether through waxing or Nair and your ten fingers, most (if not all women) shave their pubic hair for hygiene/personal/sexual reasons.

      • December 16, 2015 - Reply

        @AfroCapricornette

        Agreed. Some women who use bleaching creams may do so for personal reasons also. Why should they be called out as a self hater. Hyper-pigmentation and scarring is common in black skin, so maybe some women use bleaching creams to correct that, which could be considered for hygiene. I’m not sure about vitiligo, but if some women use bleaching creams to even out their skin tone, then it’s for medical reasons. My waxing reference was just to point out that if one can use waxing for personal and hygiene reasons and not have their racial commitment questioned, then why should bleaching cream usage be treated differently.

        • December 16, 2015 - Reply

          @Lelani

          I get you. Though bleaching in this situation refers to a melanated woman that has no pigmentation/scarring/vitiligo and is not doing it for “evening” purposes as one with pigmentation might. I don’t see how bleaching is categorized as “hygiene” as it’s defined as “conditions or practices conducive to maintaining health and preventing disease, especially through cleanliness”. Is the implication that melanin is “dirty?”. Not saying you mean that but categorizing bleaching as hygienic is a stretch to me.

          Vitiligo and such definitely affects self-esteem, no arguments there and so the personal choice to bleach is…personal. That is completely different from the film’s subject matter.

          The character here does it (does she actually go through it or changes her mind at the end??? Anyways…) because she’s been made to feel less than by her peers since childhood, all because of the degree of melanin in her. Not because she had vitiligo or any other topical skin discolouration.

  6. December 15, 2015 - Reply

    Colorism is a serious issue but idk about this movie. I’m sooo tired of seeing darker skinned women being portrayed as the only victims of colorism. Colorism affects everyone. Yes I know colorism affects Darker skinned individuals, specifically women, more but there are other layers to colorism that we really have to address.

    • December 16, 2015 - Reply

      @Dr.Rue

      Exactly It affects men too Sammy Sosa Taye Diggs anyone ?
      The compulsion of Some dark skin BM to only pursue/procreate white/light and ensure their progeny looks nothing like them is a form of genetic bleaching
      Also it is colorism to try to always portray light skin men as simps soft weaselly “insert any Terrence Howard role here ” not to mention light skin women are often ostracized “think they are all /that not black enough ” even when they are down to earth and dont have an attitude or conversely some light skin women are put on pedestals& do feel entitled think they are all that and are devastated when they realize they cant skate through life on skin color alone
      So yes there are many complexities to colorism , Im tired of the poor insecure dark skin girl who has to struggle to learn to love herself trope.
      BTW I grew up with some dark skin girls that thought they were fabulous and it was other people who were surprised by their confidence like it puzzled them

      • December 16, 2015 - Reply

        @blogdiz

        “So yes there are many complexities to colorism , Im tired of the poor
        insecure dark skin girl who has to struggle to learn to love herself
        trope”.

        Seriously, I thought I was the only one. I’m not implying that this isn’t true for some but the way an outsider sees it, they might assume all dark-skinned BW are insecure and such. As much as I loved the trailer and the production (and seeing a W/African actor in it), I’ve grown tired of watching such plot lines.

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