Yesha Callahan

Iggy Azalea Responds to Jill Scott & Eve: ‘They’re Saying Act More Like a Stereotype’

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Last week Jill Scott and Eve visited Shade 45’s Sway In The Morning to promote their Lifetime film “With This Ring” and weighed in on the current state of cultural appropriation in hip-hop and Iggy Azalea’s ‘blaccent.”

“She’s from a different place and I’ve said this before: It would be dope to hear her with her swag,” Eve said about the accent. “Who are you, what are you, what is that? Australians are so dope. From the singers, to the music to the fashion. They have it. That’s my only thing about it. I just wish there was a little bit more of possibly inserting where she came from.”

The Australian rapper took to Twitter to subliminally respond.

Check out the tweets below:

  1. January 29, 2015 - Reply

    She can have the super stadium full of seats. TI writes most if not all her verses. She is inauthentic as they come. She has no respect or knowledge of the culture of her chosen genre of music. Jill and Eve were on point with everything that they said.

  2. January 29, 2015 - Reply

    Lawl she’s even appropriating black female problems.

    She’s such a crybaby she complains more on twitter than Azealia. Look the root of the solution is we need to deport her back to Australia. No more white foreigners in our music industry plz they’re working my nerves.

  3. January 29, 2015 - Reply

    Personally I think Iggy has a point. Nothing wrong with changing and adapting as long as you’re legitimate and not coopting or exploiting. Eve, after all, came as a rapper, sort of hood rat then into television, married white millionaire and can be seen at Fashion Week in New York or Paris or vacationing in Monte Carlo. That world wasn’t part of her culture either but she adjusted.

    • January 29, 2015 - Reply

      @Darryl Hines

      Do you see Eve speaking with a French accent?

      • January 29, 2015 - Reply

        @vintage3000

        And Edris Elba doesn’t generally speak with a British accent, especially when he’s in a film.

        • January 29, 2015 - Reply

          @Darryl Hines

          Actors take on different accents for a role all the time. The issue would be if he started not talking in a British accent all the time, like during interviews.

          • January 29, 2015 - Reply

            @Tanielle

            What are rappers anyway but actors? Many take on a different persona not only on the stage but also to give the impression that they grew in the hood when actually they’re from working or middle class families. What makes Iggy less credible than black rappers who fake their street credibility?

            • January 29, 2015 - Reply

              @Darryl Hines

              I agree with you 100%. What does that have to do with Eve’s marriage, going to fashion week, or traveling?

            • January 29, 2015 - Reply

              @Darryl Hines

              Faking street cred is a lot different than trying to take on someone else’s ETHNICITY. No matter how these rappers you speak of fake their street cred, THEY CANNOT FAKE BEING BLACK BECAUSE THEY ARE BLACK.

            • January 30, 2015 - Reply

              @Darryl Hines

              When people find out that black rappers faked their street cred their is a backlash though. She wants to get around that backlash with claims of ‘individuality’.

        • January 29, 2015 - Reply

          @Darryl Hines

          What do most of his roles have in common, except for Luther?

          They are NOT British characters. Get it now?

          • January 29, 2015 - Reply

            @vintage3000

            Nope. Playing a role as an actor or rapper is all the same. It’s just entertainment. Aint that serious folks.

        • January 29, 2015 - Reply

          @Darryl Hines

          Umm, I don’t know what you’ve been watching, but when Idris is not on the screen, he very much speaks his native accent, which is BRITISH.

    • January 29, 2015 - Reply

      @Darryl Hines

      I’m sorry but your examples are not the same AT ALL. This woman is Australian and they have a certain accent. That is simply a fact. My parents are West Indian and have lived in this country for 40+years and still have accents. She is pretending to speak a certain way. Eve being a “hoodrat” and marrying a wealthy white man or vacationing in a certain place is not being phony. She is from philly but through her travels was exposed to different things and evolved. Accents don’t typically just “adjust”.

      • January 29, 2015 - Reply

        @Tanielle

        I never said Eve was a phony just that she made certain changes not consistent with where she’s from. Also, I don’t believe the article here was about Iggy not using her accent. It was about bringing some of her Australian background and experiences into her music.

        • January 29, 2015 - Reply

          @Darryl Hines

          The only reason why Iggy is popular is because she affects an accent that is not hers, so you cannot disregard the importance language has on culture appropriation.

          Also, Eve was popular as a rapper BEFORE she married a wealthy white man and began attending high profile events. Iggy became popular AFTER she put on her Black girl persona. That is the ‘entertainment’ you referenced earlier

          • January 29, 2015 - Reply

            @vintage3000

            Don’t even argue with this fool. He’s just as clueless as those who think she’s the queen of hip-hop.

        • January 29, 2015 - Reply

          @Darryl Hines

          How do you know Eve doesn’t bring her “hoodrat” experiences into her current life? This is why what you are saying does not add up. What does where she comes from have to do with marrying a millionaire or traveling the world? It simply isn’t the same as taking on a new persona and pretending to be something you aren’t to sell records.
          Eve as someone who was a rapper probably has a better understanding than you or I of being authentic in the music industry. Iggy is a poser plain and simple. Eve coming from philly but marrying a millionaire and traveling the globe are not inconsistent. Traveling is not something that people from the hood don’t do. Neither is marrying a man who loves you or going to fashion week.

          • January 30, 2015 - Reply

            @Tanielle

            “Traveling is not something that people from the hood don’t do. ”

            Thank you. He is trying to act like Eve as a global traveller and wife of a rich white man (and not just the wifey of some broke ass fool) means she is doing something totally alien for her.

          • January 30, 2015 - Reply

            @Tanielle

            So you’re suggesting “hoodrats” (whatever the freak that means) can’t/shouldn’t propel themselves forward because they would be fake? Upward mobility registers as fake/putting-on to you? That’s the premise of the American Dream. The English class system of 1800’s called and want their ideas (or lack there of) of social mobility back!

            • January 30, 2015 - Reply

              @Nellie B

              That’s definitely not what she was suggesting did you read?

          • January 30, 2015 - Reply

            @Tanielle

            Also the 10 ppl that agree with you can justifiably be call idiots or communists.

          • January 30, 2015 - Reply

            @Tanielle

            My bad! My comment was meant for Darryl.

        • January 30, 2015 - Reply

          @Darryl Hines

          What are these certain changes? Are you’re suggesting people can’t/shouldn’t propel themselves forward because they would be fake? Upward mobility registers as fake/putting-on to you? That’s the premise of the American Dream. The English class system of 1800’s called and want their ideas (or lack there of) of social mobility back!

          • January 31, 2015 - Reply

            @Nellie B

            Once again, as I said before there must be some kind of disconnect or people are reading my words and taking from them what they want. I only said that Eve has morphed into a person that she did not appear to be when she began her career—AND THAT’S GOOD BECAUSE THAT’S HER CHOICE AND HER RIGHT. Moving up, if that’s what you call it is a good thing, assuming that’s our choice. I’m an example of that as the first person in my family, including extended, who graduated from college, graduated from law school and is an attorney today. I just believe that as humans we have right to become what we want and I assume that would apply to Iggy Azalea, too.

            • January 31, 2015 - Reply

              @Darryl Hines

              Eve matured–plain and simple. Aspiring to be a rapper is fine. Aspiring to be someone else–worst, an entire culture, isn’t okay. That’s why I take issue with what you are saying. I have a cousin who thoroughly enjoys many asian cultures; watches anime, travelled to China for a year, even playfully changed his fb name to sound Japanese. But, he would never start speaking in a Asian accent (whatever that means). He would never go up to random Asians and start speaking Chinese–it’s on par with a white person dapping you up and then turning to shaking the hand of the white guy standing next to you. Black people don’t all sound/dress/look the same. Southern rappers don’t all sound the same. T.I. doesn’t sound like Outkast. Understand the distinction? Iggy can rap in her true accent and still be taken seriously. She’s attractive, talented and has an “it” factor. I suggest you read the article on Huffpo entitled Iggy Azalea and Macklemore: White Rappers in a Black Genre. It addresses key differences in their approach–one of appropriation and the other appreciation.

              • February 1, 2015 - Reply

                @Nellie B

                In my opinion white as well as black rappers aren’t appropriating a culture, they are exploiting an enterprise. Hip hop in it’s present form isn’t black culture or even a sub-culture of the black experience. It is an enterprise that is all about money and not indicative of an enduring culture. Unlike ancient Egypt or Kush’s Nubians, which we can look back with pride and amazement at their achievements and contributions to architecture and medicine. Can we say the same about hip hop. What is hip hop as a culture, other than music? Somebody please school me on this? Is it philosophical to the extent it causes us to delve into areas that extend beyond the material? Is it spiritual to the extent that we evaluate our existence and higher powers? So how have we elevated hip hop to being indicative of our culture and what are the linchpins that make it enduring?

                • February 2, 2015 - Reply

                  @Darryl Hines

                  First let’s define culture: shared experience, religion, beliefs, values, spatial relations etc. Secondly, I never implied or directly aligned Hip-hop with any particular culture. I talked about the way she spoke/dressed/rapped. Still, I would never argue that it isn’t part of black culture. Surely you know that whatever wealth–be it tangible or otherwise–that blacks accumulated was stolen, torn down, confiscated, and used to build the majority’s wealth. Music is a prime example. You do the research. Hip-hop was created to give blacks a voice. As the world changes their message is going to change.. but the tradition is still hip-hip. Main takeaway: Culture isn’t necessarily spiritual; sororities have a culture, northerners have a culture, an organized group of pizza lovers have a culture, businesses have corporate culture. *sigh* Personally, I can look back at Hip-hop and be proud. Maybe not of the message, but of the wealth it has built for blacks in the face of (mostly) covert oppression and micro aggressions. I know about these things.. I go to a predominantly white school.

                  • February 2, 2015 - Reply

                    @Nellie B

                    All can say is that I disagree with you on all counts. Other than a relatively few AAs who have gotten wealthy off of music how did hip hop create wealth for blacks. Wealth if fine if it is trickled down to help the masses. Somehow I missed that part.

                    • February 2, 2015 - Reply

                      @Darryl Hines

                      We can agree to disagree. That’s fine. While you might not identify with hip-hop, I do. Hip-hop has generally been part of black culture but not all black people like hip-hop or identify with it. Heck, the vast majority of it I don’t identify with, but rappers like Common, Nas, Lupe Fiasco, and Childish Gambino, I like. I should have been more clear about wealth: But of the wealth it has built for THOSE blacks in the face…, is what I meant to say. I take pride in seeing black people succeed and since I still don’t see many well to-do blacks on mainstream TV and elsewhere I take what I can get. I hope there comes a time where I can see someone like you, an attorney, speaking out in leadership instead of the regulars, Sharpton and Jackson. I ‘m happen to love what Viola Davis is doing/saying right now right now. Anyway, I digress. Many rappers make it a point to create non-profits to give back specifically to underprivileged minorities (or some other cause of their choice), So while they might not be “making it rain” they are helping to keep kids off of the street, teaching them skills, giving away backpacks of school supplies, building a better sense of community, and encouraging them to get an education. Like many wealthy people, they are teaching them how to fish..

        • January 30, 2015 - Reply

          @Darryl Hines

          Can I point out the fact that Eve is actually from a working middle class neighborhood NOT THE HOOD!!!! And no offence to the hood, we as a city have hood tendencies that you’d be hard pressed to not experience. But is a rough city yes but doesn’t equate the hood, not what I expect is being implied here at least. Some of her early life choices allows her to fit into that stereotype but if Eve never became a rapper and was living in Philly I imagine she’d have a pretty good quality of life that’s cultured just at a different level from what her money has allowed her to experience.
          And actually the same can be said about those that are indeed from the hood but just saying the impression I’ve always got of Eve this industry didn’t make her it allowed her to live the life she’s living where folks like myself are saving up for it:)

          • January 30, 2015 - Reply

            @donnaevette

            Not quite sure what you’re saying. As usual there’s always a certain disconnect when people write comments after an article—but it’s entertaining. My only point was that Eve came from a very different background and experience than the life she enjoys today. It doesn’t matter if she came from a working class family or was raised by the Huxtables (although maybe not Cliff). The point is she adjusted and adapted proving that we don’t have to be defined by where we came from. So why can’t Iggy do the same? I hear no complaints about McClemore or even Kid Rock who got his start working with black rappers and is now a right wing nut job.

            • January 30, 2015 - Reply

              @Darryl Hines

              When McClemore won that award, I was blown off my feet. I had never even heard of him. I have PLENTY of complaints about somebody coming out of nowhere and winning a category in which MANY other rappers should have won before he did.

            • February 10, 2015 - Reply

              @Darryl Hines

              I’m mad late but I’ll comment anyway:) I was speaking specifically to what various people were saying about Eve being from the hood, didn’t actually see your comment but some pointed out that you said she was a hoodrat. Being from Philly doesn’t automatically = hoodrat, even for those that are from the hood.
              Also to what you are saying here, being from Philly and moving to London for Eve is a bit different than Iggy being from Australia and adopting what’s trying to be a southern woman’s accent. Eve said herself in an interview she may take on certain words but she’s still Philly and she’s not trying to adopt their accent and she’d actually have to try to do so since that’s not the way she’s been speaking from birth. Lastly Iggy is mocking an accent and doing a horrible job at it vs. picking it up because she lives in ATL, if that were the case she’d speak that way on and off record.

              • February 10, 2015 - Reply

                @donnaevette

                Your words my have a ring of truth if hip hop was truly an element belonging to black culture but today’s hip hop is all about the enterprise and making money. When concert tickets for Jay Z start at $250.00 or music is purchased mostly by young whites and the industry makes it chic for them to adopt hip hop then we’ve sold out, sold it to the highest bidder. Hip hop is up for grabs. People mock us because we mock ourselves. Eve’s comments are coded in racial undertones, resenting that a blonde haired white woman is making millions off of hip hop yet she sleeps with a white man. Her credibility is zero.

                • February 11, 2015 - Reply

                  @Darryl Hines

                  What are you talking about I said nothing about hip hop, whiteness, or even blackness specifically, we’re talking about mocking accents for the most part. Iggy could be a black woman from Tennessee if she got on a song trying to sound like she was from NY I’d have just as much a problem with her. You want to make it about race that’s not the conversation I’m having.
                  And on that note I’m off this post.

    • January 29, 2015 - Reply

      @Darryl Hines

      Eve is not pretending to be something she’s not. She did not come out of the gate vacationing in Monte Carlo, being seen at fashion week in New York or Paris, and she’s only been with her white, millionaire 4 years. Eve was doing her own thing before all of this. Izzy came out, bought a booty and suddenly she speaks ebonics. Now how is THAT possible for someone who was born and raised in Australia? If she feels she’s legit, then she shouldn’t have a need to try and rationalize what she does. She’d just stfu and do whatever it is she’s supposed to be doing. But considering she doesn’t even write any of her lyrics, all she has to do is put up a façade, tweet responses about ‘haters’ back and forth, and she’s considered relevant. Not so!

      • January 29, 2015 - Reply

        @good2bfree

        What is legit in the rap industry. The whole genre is coopted by wannabee thugs who rap hard core offering guns, violence and all the while degrading women but guess they’re legit for whatever reason you might conjure. What about Drake? I take it you don’t have a problem with him and no one questions his rap pedigree even though he grew up middle class in Canada with a Jewish mom. You do realize that Canadians have an accent, too. So I guess Drake should rap using his Canadian accent with a beer in his hand while Iggy can rap like Crocodile Dundee. You all here are much too serious.

        • January 29, 2015 - Reply

          @Darryl Hines

          Amen to that, brother!!!

        • January 30, 2015 - Reply

          @Darryl Hines

          Drake has always proudly proclaimed he was from Canada. He’s never pretended that he wasn’t middle class or had a Jewish mom. Plus, Drake has spent quite a bit of time when he was growing up in the US because his father/father’s family is American and from the South. If Drake DID rap with a Canadian accent (and btw he raps the same as when he was on the Degrassi show BEFORE he blew up in the US), he’d do it with pride.

          Iggy is telling Eve and Jill that it would be stereotypical for her to rap like she’s from Australia, even though she IS from Australia and even as she is rapping like a stereotypical black girl from GA. THAT’S the problem people are having with her.

          • January 30, 2015 - Reply

            @Town

            Yeah London has some of the best rappers and bring just as much fire, you can hear their respect for the craft past an accent. Not to say the accent is an issue but you hear hip hop via their style and lyricism even though it may not sound the same as what we’re use to and it brings a new element to the genre.

      • January 29, 2015 - Reply

        @good2bfree

        Two words: Brick. Wall.

  4. January 29, 2015 - Reply

    If I recall, Eve and Jill Scott have every right to their views.

    They have every right to voices their opinions on music since they know about R&B and hip hop music. The deal with Iggy is that she can’t stand any form of correction or advice, even if that advice is legitimate. The fact is no one is denying the right of human beings to be individuals. People are criticizing how some white artists use the culture of hip hop music as a means for them to be exempt from legitimate critique. Black artists critique each other all of the time. That is nothing new. Yet, Iggy feels that she should be totally immune from any even meaningful discussion about the issue of the appropriation of hip hop culture under the guise of “individuality.” She has to realize that she has white privilege and people can agree to disagree with her (and not try to antagonize her). That is the point. Eve and Jill Scott are not slandering or disrespecting her. They are expressing their views about her.

  5. January 29, 2015 - Reply

    That would be nice if it were TRUE Iggy. Her fans are the only idiots that would fall for her lies. I really admonish women in the industry to just stop talking about her, STOP GIVING HER SHINE! Without all this, she KNOWS she would already be on the path to irrelevance.

    Please just let this useless woman fade away. These black men in the industry have been revealed for the idiots they truly are after this Iggy fiasco. I’ve given up on so many people.

    • January 30, 2015 - Reply

      @roo08

      These black men in the industry have been revealed for the idiots they truly are after this Iggy fiasco. I’ve given up on so many people.

      9th Wonder (a black man) worked with Jean Grae (a black woman) and made one of the best rap albums in the 2000s. Jean Grae has gotten very little support from black people. 9th Wonders response to Iggy.

      “HER fans buy HER shit….period. YES…it’s cultural appropriation….well…COUNTERATTACK by BUYING some cultural shit….”— 9th Wonder (@9thWonderMusic)

      • January 31, 2015 - Reply

        @Objection

        I had never heard of her and went on Youtube. She is bad!! She got a new fan now!

  6. January 29, 2015 - Reply

    What happened to the art of ignoring this heifer and the others like her? We need to stop putting her name into our sentences. We keep feeding the culture vulture than wonder why they wont go away. Don’t feed the birds dammit.

    Before the new blacks rear their heads from the white shadows answer me this one question: where has a black person been able to appropriate someone else’s culture with fakeness and receive cash and credibility because of it? Anyone? Anyone?

    • January 29, 2015 - Reply

      @Ms. Vee

      Yup- imagine a Black musician (besides Charley Pride) taking over country music. The only genre I can think of is all the great Black opera singers who seem to be well regarded in the classical world.

      Your second paragraph reminds me of a convo from a few days ago. A White male friend asked me why there are so many successful non-Black businesses in inner city Black neighborhoods, and I honestly could not answer why. ERR’BODY knows they can profit from our culture, speech, music, neighborhoods, etc.

      And speaking of selling our culture, did you know the Johnson estate is selling their entire archive of Black American images for a very low price? Black folks-we love to make other people rich, and sell ourselves short.

      • January 29, 2015 - Reply

        @vintage3000

        …and then we wonder why we get no respect.

    • January 29, 2015 - Reply

      @Ms. Vee

      Nope, not anyone because if they tried it, it would be bloody murder. We do need to stop giving this fake-wanna-be-black-for-the-moment infiltrator attention. Ignore her azz,, as well as those who are kissing her azz (yes, T,I., this means YOU) and hopefully she’ll fade away.

  7. January 29, 2015 - Reply

    I like Iggy’s response to Eve’s comments. They were very professional and well-stated. Iggy makes a very valid point that many people fail to realize. I’ve also been told that I should “act more like myself”, by people who don’t know me. And by myself they meant the “cool” stereotype of the “RHOA NeNe-esque” woman they assume me to be. At first I understood the black female annoyance with Iggy, but this absolute intolerance of her is quite baffling. Iggy can be whoever she damn-well pleases and so can you. It’s really not that serious.

    • January 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Tira Masu

      Well is speaking in her Australian accent considered being a stereotype? She does use a southern black woman’s accent in her music. IF she had grown up in a black neighborhood speaking this way would people be telling her to act like herself? I mean M&M is not seen as fake BECAUSE he was raised in a rough neighborhood and acts like a person who came from that environment. He was not raised in a McMansion in the Hollywood hills who went on to pretend he was from the 8 mile in Detroit.

      • January 30, 2015 - Reply

        @Okay

        What’s a black woman’s accent?

        • January 31, 2015 - Reply

          @ZORINO

          She said SOUTHERN Black women’s accent. Stop trying to act like you don’t know what that sounds like, fool. You need Itchy to show you what that sounds like, huh.

          • January 31, 2015 - Reply

            @vintage3000

            Lol

  8. January 29, 2015 - Reply

    Way to go, Iggy!

    Eve went from NAPPY to STRAIGHT hair. Is that cultural appropriation???

    • January 29, 2015 - Reply

      @ZORINO

      *sigh* the problem is cultural misappropriation especially for financial gain. Black girls wearing straight hair does not make them money. Also, there are plenty of black women with naturally straight and near straight hair. ALSO, white women have curly hair, and even still some have fro’s.

      The other problem is that even though these transgressors of cultural misappropriation LOVE BLACK CULTURE they want NOTHING to do with the black community. So black girls have worn braids for centuries.. no props. White girl wears same braids and she suddenly must have invented them. It’s kinda effed up if you think about it.

      • January 30, 2015 - Reply

        @Nellie B

        White girl wears same braids and she suddenly must have invented them.

        _________________

        Just like big butts. Black women have had that feature forever, but when a white girl comes along with a big butt, all of a sudden that’s the ish. You can go down the line — jazz, blues, hip hop and any other cultural phenomena. We start it then it’s misappropriated by the mainstream.

    • January 29, 2015 - Reply

      @ZORINO

      Learn the difference between appropriation and assimilation.

      • January 30, 2015 - Reply

        @Petty Levert

        Is Eve’s hair transformation a cultural appropriation or assimilation?

        • January 30, 2015 - Reply

          @ZORINO

          Google works….

          • January 30, 2015 - Reply

            @Petty Levert

            Come on, you brought up the two concepts and should be able to define them. Don’t go google on me.

            • January 31, 2015 - Reply

              @ZORINO

              It’s not my job to enlighten you on your extremely lazy and uninformed “Black women are appropriators cause of weave and blond hair” trope. Look it up and educate yourself.

              • January 31, 2015 - Reply

                @Petty Levert

                I swear trolls are a special kind

                • January 31, 2015 - Reply

                  @eve-audrey

                  Enjoy your Weekend Eve-audrey.

                • January 31, 2015 - Reply

                  @eve-audrey

                  Girl…

                  • January 31, 2015 - Reply

                    @Petty Levert

                    So, I’m a Negro now??? Ok, whatever. I like and supported Iggy’s album The New Classic. You don’t like it. That’s ok. No need to throw a tantrum, it’s entertainment at the end of the day. It’s not that serious.

    • January 30, 2015 - Reply

      @ZORINO

      Shut up.

      • January 30, 2015 - Reply

        @vintage3000

        Says the person who can’t debate as a civilized human being.

        #EducationIsFundamental

        • January 31, 2015 - Reply

          @ZORINO

          There is no debating with a troll who pretends to be obtuse.

  9. January 30, 2015 - Reply

    I think everyone is missing the point. Iggy Azalea is already a stereotype of an
    American female hip pop artist. So I believe the point Eve and Jill were
    driving home has more to do with the heart of hip hop: infusing cultural authenticity into the music and culture. PERIOD. No matter where you come from rep your hood with truth. The Beastie Boys did it. House of Pain did it. Fergie did it. Will Smith did it. Eminem did it. Hell even when it comes to R&B Teena Marie did it. And most Black people I know love Tenna Marie hands down. No questions asked. So it would be nice if Iggy used her accent and/or incorporated dope beats that featured traditional Australian instruments. How about talk about what matters from the perspective of how she grew up. Not just when she moved to Miami to pursue modeling. Talk about being an Australian that loves hip hop. Talk about how the culture touched you, inspired you and shaped your desire to be a part of it while living on the other side of the world. That is the point I think Jill, Eve, and the rest of us are making. We want artistry; not packaged bubble gum hip hop. And maybe I’m wrong, but Iggy just seems like she could be offering so much more to the culture than she does.

    • January 31, 2015 - Reply

      @divalive247

      Excellent points, thx for breaking it down like this. I’m not a Teena Marie fan but I could listen to Lisa Stansfield all day long.. It’s not a matter of not wanting White people to create Black music- Itchy does not have that authenticity as an artist, she is only a parody of a Black female rapper with a fake southern accent.

  10. January 30, 2015 - Reply

    Girl, go on and do the white thing with McLemore (sp?) who, out of nowhere wins best rapper and I still can’t figure that out.

  11. January 30, 2015 - Reply

    On this very website I usually read «AA/Black people are not a monolithic group». Well, neither are Australians/White people. Just because she’s Australian doesn’t mean she has to rap in one particular accent. She’s an artist she can express herself in the vernacular she chooses too.

    That blaccent comment must be the most idiotic comment I’ve heard from a celebrity this year.

    • January 31, 2015 - Reply

      @ZORINO

      No the most stupid comment is the one that says bw straighten their hair out of cultural appropriation. And i feel like idiots only bring bw hair into a conversation when they have no counter argument to what bw are saying.
      Assimilation a phenomenon because of which People from minorities, especially “visible” ones have to change their customs And their apparence in order to fit in with the majority. bw have historically worn their hair straight because their natural hair was / is not accepted. Not because they are shamelessly copying other People physical And cultural attributes, gaining money And taking credit for it while not giving a damn about said People. It’s the same when asians widen their Eyes. They still have the right to defend what makes them unique without having gangs of dummies at their throats.

      This is your explanation. Do you feel a bit smarter Now?

      • January 31, 2015 - Reply

        @eve-audrey

        Exactly.

        White folks have had wigs and weaves for centuries. There has been no massive outcry against those white people. Black women have every God-given right to wear her hair in a diversity of ways. It is a shame that black people have been scapegoated over the issue of hair when hair doesn’t define one’s consciousness. You can love your heritage and love blackness if you wear your hair in a myriad of different orientations.

        Vous avez montré de grandes vérités.

        Keep on preaching Sister.

        • February 1, 2015 - Reply

          @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

          Thanks truth

          • February 1, 2015 - Reply

            @eve-audrey

            You’re Welcome Sister.

      • January 31, 2015 - Reply

        @eve-audrey

        Get laid, it’s good for your mental health.

        • February 1, 2015 - Reply

          @ZORINO

          Like i said, when idiots have nothing to say… lol have a good day

          • February 3, 2015 - Reply

            @eve-audrey

            Please, tell the moronic committee that meets inside your head to sit down and shut up.

      • February 3, 2015 - Reply

        @eve-audrey

        Everyone is entitled to be stupid but you abuse the privilege.

        Iggy got 99 problems but @eve-audrey ain’t one.

        • September 8, 2015 - Reply

          @ZORINO

          So, you’re about 15, right? Stop playing on websites for adults.

          • September 9, 2015 - Reply

            @FromTokyo

            DESPERATION AIN’T NO FICTION!

            Replying to a comment from 7 months ago !?! Madavucker why???

  12. January 31, 2015 - Reply

    I wish she would take a one way trip to the moon! I’m so sick of her!

  13. January 31, 2015 - Reply

    Seriously, some of you guys have serious issues. This has to be deeper than just rap music and Iggy Azalea.

    If you don’t like her music then don’t listen to it. Nobody’s forcing you. Instead of spending this energy on hating Iggy, you should buy music by rappers you DO like.

  14. January 31, 2015 - Reply

    I think it’s laughable when I read comments here that charge Iggy Azalea with stealing our culture and referring to hip hop as a culture at all. According to many commenters she has coopted our culture and has been guilty of the most heinous of crimes, i.e. stealing hip hop culture. IMO News flash: Hip hop is “not” a culture, my good people. In its present form it is a corporation. In fact, it’s many corporations who attempt to define what they call black culture and then turn around and exploit it for profit. And like any for-profit corporation or venture there is no claim of ownership unless it’s patented, trademarked or is proprietary by its nature. Hip hop doesn’t belong to anyone person, place or thing. If it belongs to black culture then there’s a whole lot of us who aren’t getting paid for the licensing of our culture. So ask Jay Z to send you a check for his fortuitous exploitation of our culture and I can imagine what he’ll tell you and it wont be nice.

  15. January 31, 2015 - Reply

    At this point, she needs to shut up! Shut up and put the heat on wax. You want to make me a believer? You want to show people you’re the “realest?” Drop a dope record that YOU wrote that addresses this. Until then keep your cheap words, shut your trap, and getta steppin!

  16. February 2, 2015 - Reply

    Iggy Azalea relocated to the US at the age of 15 and has been living here for 10 years. She grew up on Hip-Hop like many young people around the world. And some of you believe she shouldn’t rap in a “blaccent” or whatever you call it. Shame on you, Eve, and Jill Scott.

  17. February 3, 2015 - Reply

    sooo let me get this right… instead of acting as “her” stereotype.. she chooses to act as “ours”? … girl bye!

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