Yesha Callahan

Empire’s Grace Gealey Says She Wasn’t Aware She Was Light-Skinned Until She Came To America

Grace-5

Grace Gealey, better known as ‘Anika’ on Empire or Boo-Boo Kitty, says she received a life lesson once she left the Cayman Islands for the United States when she was 18-years-old. In an interview with Details, Gealey said before she left home, she never realized she was light-skinned.

“For me personally, it’s the whole light-skinned/dark-skinned dynamic [for women of color]. I mean, there’s competition among women everywhere you go. But back home we understand that you can look like a variety of things and still be from the same culture. What I’m saying is that I’ve never felt like I was a light-skinned black woman. Never felt that way because we shared the same culture back home. But when I came to America, that’s when I started to feel that there was a lot of push-back from women. I was definitely made aware that I am light-skinned. I realized that was a thing here,” Gealey stated.

When asked what she meant by her statement, she delved further into intra-racism.

“It was something that people felt the need to point out. I guess maybe it’s a form of intra racism: I was discriminated against for being light-skinned and there were a lot of labels. Some people assumed that guys might like me more because of my complexion or that I had it easier in general. Which is funny because I’ve been a victim of prejudice as well: There were times when I have walked into a Rite Aid at 12 o’clock at night and had the store manager stand in the corner and stare at me while I was looking at nail polishes,” Gealey explained.

Gealey’s remarks seem to echo similar sentiments of light-skinned women, not only the Caribbean but also here in the U.S. As someone who has visited Cayman Islands for long periods of time, I’ve noticed colorism and people being discriminated because of their complexion. But I’m not one to discount Gealey’s experiences.

Clutchettes, what do you think about Gealey’s comments?

  1. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    I’m a bit confused. Is she trying to say that colorism doesn’t exist in her native country? Because even though I’ve never been to the Cayman Islands, I find that very very hard to believe.

    • April 1, 2015 - Reply

      @PrimmestPlum

      In regard to hiding her accent, her accent might be ‘thick’.
      Plus, in Hollywood, I believe there are certain dialects and accents that are “marketable” (English, certain Irish dialects, certain Latinx/Hispanic dialects, certain American-Southern dialects…) to the masses.

      • April 1, 2015 - Reply

        @Michelle

        I see what you’re saying about how certain accents are more “acceptable”. However, Rihanna has a very apparent Caribbean accent (it’s more mellowed out now but it’s still there) and that hasn’t stopped her from being marketable. Lupita Nyongo has a detectable African accent and that hasn’t hindered her too much.

        • April 1, 2015 - Reply

          @PrimmestPlum

          Because it is detectable.
          I’ve heard Grace speak in her dialect and it sounded thick, to me.

        • April 1, 2015 - Reply

          @PrimmestPlum

          Lupita has a detectable African accent? I’d like to think you’re not deliberately lumping Africans together. You meant Kenyan accent, Maybe?

          • April 1, 2015 - Reply

            @ZORINO

            No I meant I was said. To my American ears unless I’m paying very close attention to intonation, inflection or certain phrases, many continental African accents sound very similar to one another to me. The same way certain Scottish and Irish accents as well as German and Dutch accents. To me, they can blend together and sound very similar when speaking English.

            Were you offended?

            • April 1, 2015 - Reply

              @PrimmestPlum

              That’s not true at all. To a US ear a Ghanaian, Nigerian or Liberian may sound distinctively “African”. However, there many more nationalities and linguistic entities in Africa. Some Africans speak French, Portuguese, Spanish, Arabic. And when they do I don’t believe it’s going to necessarily sound “African” to an American ear. Anyway, maybe it’s just me because I’ve lived in many places.

              Back to main subject though I think we in the US take the whole Light-skinned Dark-skinned discourse too far sometimes. It’s ridiculous.

              • April 1, 2015 - Reply

                @ZORINO

                I did say to my American ears and I should’ve specified that I was referring to majority English speaking African countries. But even with French speaking Africans, I still detect a distinctly “African” phonetic structure. (I speak some French and I could detect an African accent when conversing with someone pretty well.) I’m not entirely sure how to describe it but I still stand by my original statement that there are distinct traits in speech patterns. I’m sorry that I offended you.
                I haven’t lived in many places unfortunately but I was partially raised overseas, and even in Italy I could detect much of the same. Most of the time they were Somali however.

                • April 1, 2015 - Reply

                  @PrimmestPlum

                  No need to be sorry.You didn’t offend me. You have an opinion, and that’s ok. I personally believe it’s sometimes more perception than reality. Maybe the Africans I’ve met spoke “White”, idk. For example, most of the Somalis I’ve met sounded Arabic to me when we communicated in English, etc.

                  • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                    @ZORINO

                    I still don’t understand the phrases “acting/speaking White” so please explain this. I got this from AA young females. I’m a W/African raised female living in NYC, dark skinned with a slight African accent, and I was told that when I worked retail during grad school. I was like, “huh???”

                    Maybe the Africans you met that spoke “White” were raised in America from childhood so it’s only normal they have an American accent. Even those not raised here can fake it a bit for interviews, work etc (heck, I do it but it’s a chore as it ain’t natural lol).

                    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                      @AfroCapricornette

                      Acting or speaking white is mostly used pejoratively towards the person who is accused of such. Honestly, I wouldn’t be able to pinpoint the exact definition.

                      To me it’s more important if the person is articulating well. We shouldn’t sweat the small stuff.

    • April 7, 2015 - Reply

      @PrimmestPlum

      what rubbed me the wrong way about her was how she said on some talk show that she would hide behind her hair because she had a lot of acne marks on her face ” like dark skinned women do” i was like WTF?

  2. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    As a West Indian I am a very annoyed when fellow West Indians try to pretend that colorism isn’t an issue in the Islands because it is ( to vary degrees )

    What I will say is that IMO probably because The USA is white dominated culture AA take colorism to a whole new almost pathological level of obsession that I find almost bizarre

    PS : Slightly to her defense in the Cayman Island a large potion of the island is light skinned so shes probably doesn’t really stand out l/ooks like everyone else

    • April 1, 2015 - Reply

      @blogdiz

      I believe that’s it.
      I have a relative (by marriage) who is from Saint Lucia. She was born and raised there. She came to the United States, two years ago. One of the things that she noticed was the colorism and the intra-racial prejudice. She acknowledged the colorist process that occurs in her homeland, but she said that here (in the United States) it is a whole different bag.

      • April 1, 2015 - Reply

        @Michelle

        And you know, sometimes we have to use deductive reasoning. In my experience, light skinned girls act defensive. So, I can reason that they must have a reason for that behavior. I don’t live in their skin, all I can go on is their words and behavior.

        • April 4, 2015 - Reply

          @Love.tweet.joi

          I dont get it girl. I have never been treated any type of way by darker skinned chicks because of my light skin. Never! but then again, I don’t act like having light skin is the shit. I wasn’t raised that way. Having dark skinned friends I had seen the difference in how they are treated verse how I am and its disgusting.

          • April 4, 2015 - Reply

            @Staci Elle

            I didn’t really see it until my son came out light. Teachers, strangers, some family treat him differently. Some people will feel comfortable talking to him and don’t speak to me at all. With family OMG I just cant with the excitement they expressed when his complexion didnt darken. Both of his parents are dark skinned so they were too happy about his complexion. I think he is very handsome because of his dimples and long eyelashes but i wonder if they would pressure me to put him on TV if he were darker.

            • April 4, 2015 - Reply

              @Love.tweet.joi

              Im sorry you have to go through that sis. I really am.

            • April 4, 2015 - Reply

              @Love.tweet.joi

              I also wanted wanted to say that most of the colorism lve seen has come from black men. And I think that is why some light skinned women perpetuate it. But as Ive said so many times to other light skinned chicks…. If they want you because your light, imagine what they’d do for a white girl? dont be so quick to bask in that bullshit its a slippery slope my friend.

              • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                @Staci Elle

                Yep! When my ex told his friend who also played ball that I was black, he asked, “Well how dark is she?” Like, maybe I can handle the fact that youre dating a sista if she isnt that dark. After me, it was like he was reintroducing these brothas to black women. They all dumped (and divorced) the white women they were with and married black women. Strangest thing i’d ever seen!

                • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                  @Love.tweet.joi

                  WOW! I guess thats good? Girl, you are fit and healthy thats attractive- they can try to deny their attraction but they cant. I went to school with an older black dude ( He was in Vietnam) and he was divorcing a ww. He told me that whenever they had an argument she would call the police and say ” a black man is beating a white woman, please hurry” he said he was in handcuffs 5 min later every time. Then she would come bail him out. Some sick shit but I cant lie I was crackin up like well, thats what you chose to love dude. Black men and white women have the highest divorce rate of any type of couple, they’ll learn.

                  • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                    @Staci Elle

                    I didnt know that about the divorce rate!

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @Love.tweet.joi

                      😉 You saw it for yourself with ur ex’s friends. That is NOT uncommon.

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @Love.tweet.joi

                      And black women and white men have the lowest. So when black men talk about how difficult we are and how easy ww are I just just smile and think of the actual numbers. ( and no I do not like white dudes)

                      • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                        @Staci Elle

                        That is so deep on so many levels. Thanks for the info…

                  • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                    @Staci Elle

                    Wow! That was sick of her! The again some women in arguments with their men (color not withstanding) call the cops and say that they’re being abused just to get even…even when it’s not true.

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @AfroCapricornette

                      yeah but when a white woman using her white priviledge to get what she wants, thats even more insidious. What that tells me is that she only saw him as a black man that she had something over on not HER man. (shrugs)

                      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                        @Staci Elle

                        Too true. I read a couple of years ago that Terrence Howard divorced from his previous wife cos she called him the N-word during arguments. That’s just disturbing. Sigh…

                        • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                          @AfroCapricornette

                          thats who he chose to marry so I dont feel sorry for him at all. If you hate yourself so much that you chose to elevate a racist over your own kind, you are lost me. Terrence howard continuously chooses non black chicks to love and commit to so he should just lay in the bed he made and STFU.

                          • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                            @Staci Elle

                            Is this an American thing though? I notice WW from Britain or Mainland Europe are less likely to be so racially driven. Where American women seem to see black men more as a fetish.

                            • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                              @Jane

                              I dont know about ww from britain or Europe so I cant speak on that.

                              • April 5, 2015

                                @Staci Elle

                                America seems pretty messed up.

                              • April 5, 2015

                                @Jane

                                What is your motive for all of this Jane? As I say you perpetuate what you love… I know that black men overwhelmingly chose white women in Europe and Britain so IMO they aren’t trying to make black children, and thats messed up. Its the same anti-blackness and self hate.

                              • April 5, 2015

                                @Staci Elle

                                That’s a lie. Most black men are with black women. Besides, in Europe/UK, Black men are not one. Nigerians are different to Jamaicans who are different to Somalians and so forth.

                              • April 5, 2015

                                @Jane

                                I agree that most black men are with black women, but I do know that it is much more common in Europe and Britain than in the US. And I never said anywhere that blacks from different cultures had the same customs, never so I have no idea why your saying what u r. However, my point was that Eurocentric beauty standards are worldwide not just perpetuated in the US, that means that every black person is touched by it in some way.

                              • April 6, 2015

                                @Staci Elle

                                How can every black person be touched if most black men marry black women.

                              • April 6, 2015

                                @Jane

                                because colorism is a part of anti-blackness Jane. Black men prefer light skinned women because of colorism which is a branch in the tree of global anti-blackness. Thats a part of what we re here speaking about.

                              • April 6, 2015

                                @Jane

                                SMH U should really do your own research maybe start start with global standards of beauty. Maybe start with how ww are overwhelmingly the standard of beauty worldwide and the closer you are to that standard the more attractive you are deemed. Maybe listen to dark women and what they go through with men, Im not making this up, its there for you to find if you would only look.

                              • April 8, 2015

                                @Jane

                                You are ignorant. You think because of most black marry each other they’re not effected by colorism GTFOH, from birth any black person who is exposed to media. sees that the standard of beauty is a damn pale ww. Educate yourself please.

                              • April 5, 2015

                                @Jane

                                Tell me when I said blacks from other cultures were the same. And I also agree that most black people marry each other, it is MUCH more prevalent in Europe and the UK compared the US though. So I ask myself, what exactly is your point in your comments to me about how European and British ww and bm do it for some “better” reason compared to how it is in the US. My point is that anti-blackness and eurocentric beauty standards are not just perpetuated in the US, its worldwide. So black people in Europe and in the Uk feel it as well, so in that we are the same. The main difference is that as AfroCapricornette mentioned, Africans and other non American blacks are more concerned with making sure their children are raised up with their culture, while American blacks can be self hating that they don’t even realize that we have our own RICH culture which we do.

                              • April 6, 2015

                                @Staci Elle

                                I never said you said that all black cultures were the same. I was just stating that there are different types of people from African decent and what a Nigerian man will view a woman will be different to what a Jamaican man will view a woman.

                              • April 6, 2015

                                @Jane

                                but the white woman is held up as the standard of beauty worldwide, and the closer you are to that ideal the more beautiful your’re considered. Please use google and do your won research.

                              • April 6, 2015

                                @Jane

                                yes and the white standard of beauty is forced upon all people who come in contact with white people, regardless of culture.

                              • April 5, 2015

                                @Jane

                                Girl, what are you really trying to say here? That In Europe and Britain Black men choose ww because they’re so fing lovable. Girl please, you perpetuate what you love and these black men aren’t trying to perpetuate black children so as far as Im concerned there is some anti-blackness somewhere in there.

                        • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                          @AfroCapricornette

                          I just cheecked. Terrence Howard has been married 4 times!? Some people never learn.

                  • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                    @Staci Elle

                    That’s usually because women of colour who marry white men become super submissive to white men. White women have been raised spoilt and screw over their own men, so are less likely to change.

                    • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                      @Jane

                      Im not going to agree with that. But if thats what you’ve encountered so be it.

                    • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                      @Jane

                      Well, I read all the time that White men prefer Asian women because they are super submissive. True? Apparently, it’s such a plague in California that most Asians are surprised to see an Asian couple. I think it just depends on culture. Western raised people seem to be spoiled compared to those from much poorer countries.

                      • April 6, 2015 - Reply

                        @AfroCapricornette

                        Asian women aren’t more submissive. Most Asian women are super strict. It’s just that many Asian unashamedly appraise whiteness.

                • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                  @Love.tweet.joi

                  If thats you in the pic, you’re not even dark ( they were trippin).. your caramel or brown sugar , about the same color as that nicole chick who’s on here arguing with everybody talking about how light she is.
                  But If you want to see some beautiful blue black skin there is an article on AfroLounge about a native tribe they found in India, OMG they are some stunning people!

                  • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                    @Staci Elle

                    Nah, I’m definitely darker than a paper bag. My celebrity twin (since five!) is Keshia Knight Pulliam (Rudy Huxtable).

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @Love.tweet.joi

                      She is beautiful, your in good company.

                      • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                        @Staci Elle

                        🙂

                  • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                    @Staci Elle

                    I read about that last year or so. That tribe is actually African, yes! Seedi or Siddi from India. Their ancestors were from eastern Africa and did the trade routes (not through slavery) with India and S/E Asia. Over the centuries they settled in Gujarat, formed a community and rarely mix with the native Hindu pop. They are the lowest on the totem pole in terms of education, amenities etc but they are gorgeous! Most Indians don’t even know about it. Yeah, you learn everyday and I was shocked to read about it. History, eh?

                  • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                    @Staci Elle

                    Lol! Aww you still thinking about me? How sweet, but I don’t swing that way. Nothing against your lifestyle but it’s just not for me. So Miss smartazz, point out a comment of me arguing bout how light I am. No you won’t cause you can’t. You just stay on the internet being the bitter black woman that you are. So pathetic you have to make up lies about people. Smdh.

                    • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                      @Nonya Bizz

                      Girl? what are you talking about? Calling me gay again? Please do, it bothers me not one bit. And Im bitter why? according to you only dark women can be bitter right? lol

                      • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                        @Staci Elle

                        Hey, there’s nothing wrong with being gay. Own it. Now let’s point out the three types of black women that us normal black folks try to avoid.
                        1. The stuck up light skin chick.
                        2. The angry bitter loud brown skin chick.
                        3. The low self esteem light skin chick who acts like a lap dog and gets pushed around by bitter loud brown skin chicks. (hates self for being lighter complexioned)
                        You, cat 3.

                        • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                          @Nonya Bizz

                          LMAO , you’re amusing.Black women are so diverse and have a myriad of combinations of personality traits. I open my eyes to the world and try not to be so self centered that I can’t see what my sisters go through ( light and dark- unlike you I also try to understand if there are material consequences to them). Ive never been pushed around by anyone and Im not going to start in my 30’s- You dont have to wonder about “those mean dark skinned girls “bullying me , lol. You may take my empathy for weakness but its not, black women have always been there in my corner esp. when Ive needed support the most. I suspect that the problems you’ve had with black women have more to do with your abrasive personality and willful ignorance than your complexion.

                          • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                            @Staci Elle

                            I’m an adult now and the black women I know act like adults therefore we have no problems with each other. Us normal people be that black, white, or whatever, don’t go around judging and mistreating people based off their complexion. And us normal black women try to avoid the ones I listed and those with stank personalities like you and your gf.

                            “And your not light skinned your brown. So get over yourself ok?”

                            LOL! I said I was “lighter skin” than the black girls that were calling me names. Didn’t say I was “light skinned”. Funny how your simple brain chooses to focus on the most insignificant part of my comment.
                            It is you who needs to get over yourself. I came on here to discuss issues plaguing the black community, and you and mmmthot turned it into a personal attack on me. The only time my complexion ever comes up is when an ignorant white or other asks me what I’m mixed with, or mentally messed up beast like you get mad because I don’t bow down to bitter dark girls who don’t think I’m black enough.

                            But It’s Easter, so like other NORMAL black women and people in general, I’m going to go spend time with my family. You just stay on the internet and boost your ego by making up lies about me. Bye.

                    • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                      @Nonya Bizz

                      Oh by the way, In every comment you made to me it was about how bad youve been treated because you’re light. I was just pointing out that your not really even light, your brown which isnt an insult. There is nothing wrong with being brown or black and nothing “right” with being light.

                      • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                        @Staci Elle

                        Enough with the lies already. I responded once got that chick ONE TIME lets say it again ONE TIME to a comment you made saying light skin chicks never get harassed or picked on. How pathetic it is that you have to make yourself feel better by lying on others. I feel sorry for you. Maybe if your parents had treated you better, you wouldn’t need to lie on others to boost your self esteem.

                        • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                          @Nonya Bizz

                          🙂 no need to feel sorry for me, my parents are some of my favorite hang out buddies. Next to my sisters.

                          And I never said light skinned chicks never get picked on. I said Ive never seen it and I havent. I also went on to say that even a light skinned chick gets picked on and doesn’t erase the fact that dark skinned people are discriminated against more than light skinned folks and that being dark skinned has material consequences. Colorism is more than insults going back and forth.

              • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                @Staci Elle

                Aren’t men usually attarcted to fair. Doesn’t a white man gravitate more towards blondes than a darker haired woman? I doubt most black men would pass a Naomi Campbell look a like for a generic beige girl.

                However, you are right, if he does aim for a fair women it is usually for sex. Many white women who have dyed their hair yellow have said they get approached more, but for the wrong reasons.

                • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                  @Jane

                  I cant talk about what black men are “usually” attracted to when global anti blackness and Eurocentric standards of beauty reign supreme. As I sad earlier there was no colorism before people of color were exposed to yt. As far as white men and blonds, I read somewhere ( mainstream fashion mag) that brunettes get married more and earlier than blonds so again I don’t know. . No one in my family on either side is married to a non black person so (luckily) I cant speak on that. What I can say is that Black people who love black people and who want black people to continue, marry and have children with black people.

                  • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                    @Staci Elle

                    Lol. Jane is probably not American and is just trying to understand it all. Let me say this from what I’ve seen growing up: most African men prefer African women based on shared culture and values and will go out of their way to marry one. Of course, there are those that marry AA, WW, Asians despite some family disapproval as parents, grand-parents are worried that any children born will not be taught African culture/values if the mom is non-African.

                    • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                      @AfroCapricornette

                      I agree that most black people marry each other, I’m referring to some of the ones that do marry outside. And I’m still not referring to all that marry out. Some of the relationships are based upon love, while some are based upon self hate and festishism.

                      And yes, the African family has a valid concern. The mother has the most influence over the child normally and this is even when children are raised in the two parent home. So if the father is african most likely the child wont absorb the culture like they would with an african mom too.

    • April 1, 2015 - Reply

      @blogdiz

      Exactly!

  3. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    Of course there is Colorism in the caribbean. The difference is that in these places, lighter skinned black folks were given preferential treatment and allowed to play a intermediate role between whites and blacks during the colonial era. See Haitian and Jamaican creoles as a class to understand that. But of course, you got folks blaming Negroes for being ‘racist’ when black folks have been accepting of and welcoming of lighter skinned black folks since forever. I always take a side glance at folks who like to pretend that somehow black folks have ever received any benefit from colorism. You cannot show me any place on earth where dark skin is elevated over lighter skin and especially not in the Western Hemisphere. Not to mention I dont ever recall any black bag tests in black society either or any black vesion of ‘brown stay around’. Talk about twisting reality. But I guess she has experienced some jealousy from darker skinned folks….(ahem.. females) because guys are probably trying to get at her (from all races).

  4. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    This reminds me of how so many lighter or white Brazilians like to say there is no colorism in Brazil.

    • April 1, 2015 - Reply

      @vintage3000

      They didn’t notice those darker skinned girls being discriminated against.

      • April 1, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        Exactly–that is when they are color blind.

        And I don’t know anything about the Cayman Islands, but I do know Lee Daniels has stated himself how he is color struck. Nothing against this particular actress, but the irony is that Daniels probably only wanted a lighter skinned actress for this role from get. So this colorism that she was unaware of until being challenged by darker woman may be the exact reason why she is on a hit show.

        • April 1, 2015 - Reply

          @vintage3000

          No one likes to think that they could have been favored due to something they have no control over. It is much easier to believe that colorism was invented by a bunch of insecure people who arent as qualified.

        • April 1, 2015 - Reply

          @vintage3000

          Exactly I am finding more and more the same tone deafness about colorism and light skinned privilege as trying to explain racism and white privilege to white folks

          • April 1, 2015 - Reply

            @blogdiz

            You’re right.

      • April 2, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        Please don’t act as if only “darker skinned girls” get discriminated against.

        • April 3, 2015 - Reply

          @Nicole

          To be fair Nicole, I am not trying to minimize what light skinned girls endure. We are all black. When a light complexioned woman says colorism doesn’t exist where she’s from, I hear that she is completely deaf and blind to the issues of our people. It wasn’t an attack on light skinned women although I can see how it came off that way. Peace.

          • April 3, 2015 - Reply

            @Love.tweet.joi

            Here people go over overboard with this light-skinned dark-skinned dynamic. People should be able to embrace all different shades of Black without obsessing about it.

            • April 3, 2015 - Reply

              @ZORINO

              Pretending that colorism doesnt exist isnt the answer. I can embrace all different shades if I want, but it won’t change the reality. Colorism is real. The people who are obsessing over it, are the ones who discriminate against others, not the ones who are sick of being discriminated against.

              • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                @Love.tweet.joi

                I don’t see this colorism issue within the Caucasian communities in North America nor in Europe. At least not to the same degree as in Black America.

                Do you happen to know why it seems to be a bigger issue in Black America than else where? How do you define colorism, and what are your suggestions to end it?

                • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                  @ZORINO

                  Whites are the perpetrators of colorism since IDK slavery. You know, racism is race plus power. Colorism is systematic as well. So, I know what colorism is and how it affects me in my life because I am a dark skinned woman. BUT to prove my case that colorism is a “thing” and that it affects blacks on a socioeconomic scale, I am going to give you a few facts.
                  Side note: Most Black people aren’t “obsessed” with anything unless it affects our MONEY.

                  1. Colorism is the discrimination against those
                  with a darker skin tone.

                  2. Studies show that colorism has affected our
                  socioeconomic status since…IDK SLAVERY. So, here we are, already pretty much collectively broke. On top of the disadvantage of being Black. On top of the
                  disadvantage of being a woman. There is the disadvantage of being darker than a
                  paper bag.

                  3. Dark skinned boys and girls are disciplined
                  more harshly than light skinned boys and girls at an elementary school level by Whites, not blacks (I felt I needed to emphasize that).

                  4. Early black fraternities utilized the paper bag
                  test. If one was darker than a paper bag, they didn’t get in. There went our connections…

                  5. Most of the studies done are on light skinned
                  and dark skinned men (because if they were to do the same study on a group black women, there would be too many disadvantages happening all at the same
                  time).

                  6. The study done by the Los Angeles Study of
                  Urban Inequality in 1994 showed that “being a dark-skinned black male reduces the odds of reduces the odds of working by 52 percent.”

                  7. Dark skinned black men statistically receive
                  less education and employment opportunities.

                  8. It’s not just blacks, it affects Mexicans as
                  well. But that’s a whole other topic!

                  • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                    @Love.tweet.joi

                    I lol’d @ Most Black people aren’t “obsessed” with anything unless it affects our MONEY. Emphasis on money. Like that!

                    Thanks for replying with more details. You learn something new every day. Those are legitimate concerns.

                    My only gripe with colorism or intraracism (As I like to call it) is when Black folks perpetrate and perpetuate it with all this Team Light-Skinned vs Team Dark-Skinned bs, the jokes. We’re adding insult to injury by engaging in some of these activities. Even the Tom Joyner m’fing Show does this colorist stuff.

                    Well, I was fortunate enough to live in different countries so my perspective is a bit different at times because of my foreign exposure, I guess. I sincerely wish more of our people had the chance to travel, study abroad and live abroad. It does help a great deal. However, I understand that some people are caught in a vicious cycle.*KanYeshrug*

                    When I was/felt discriminated against I never felt it was due to “my kind of Brown”. To me it was simply b/c I was Black. I’ve never felt like I was discriminated against more than my Mulatto or light-skinned peers. If anything, they sometimes got it worse than me.

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @ZORINO

                      A good friend of mine and her sister (both light and heavy) referred to their pretty darkskinned heavy neighbor as Precious. Shocked me to know that if I werent smaller than them,theywould think that of me too!

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @ZORINO

                      I learned today that darker mexicans are less educated, less likely to know English and typically arent unionized. That came from a Harvard study.

                      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                        @Love.tweet.joi

                        I read somewhere else that it’s the African and Native American (i.e. darker colored) Central/South Americans that are disenfranchized.

                  • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                    @Love.tweet.joi

                    Not to mention, in other cultures that whole concept of fairer skin = money and darker skin = poor, that the rich stayed pampered indoors, while the poor toiled away in the sun. I heard that concept occurred in Europe and Asia. The caste system in India, too. And I think it was in the Dark Girls documentary, the Ethiopian lady said it occurred in Feudal Ethiopia.

                    There is NO way people can deny colorism, just cause it hasn’t been experienced directly; one could easily find thousands of experiences just doing a search on today’s web or studying documents and news from the past.

      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        How can they not notice that their only whites on Tv there SMH. They had a black girl in a starring role for the first time recently, sometime in the 2000’s.

    • April 1, 2015 - Reply

      @vintage3000

      Lies! Ive been to Brazil, go to the Favelas ( the hood but worse) You see nothing but black people there. Look on TV there nothing but white skin is celebrated. They say racism is outlawed but its is in name only.

      • April 2, 2015 - Reply

        @Staci Elle

        Have you been to Bahia in Brazil? I have always wanted to visit there.

        • April 2, 2015 - Reply

          @vintage3000

          I have its beautiful.. its considered a vaction spot for them too. Its kinda hard to see all the rich white lookin people having fun and the dark people working though. When you go remember to take a trip to the Favelas ( a real eye opener)

          • April 3, 2015 - Reply

            @Staci Elle

            Im from Inglewood and I’m scared of the Favelas.

            • April 4, 2015 - Reply

              @Love.tweet.joi

              lol I was too mama

            • April 4, 2015 - Reply

              @Love.tweet.joi

              INGLEWOOOD! my sis lives over there by the Burlington. Im in inglewood all of the time.

              • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                @Staci Elle

                I take my son to school down that way. I’m only a few blocks north of there near Big Lots.

                • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                  @Love.tweet.joi

                  Glad to see a Cali girl on here fighting the good fight. And you work out with weights too? Gone with ya bad self.

  5. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    I think she misspoke. She is probably trying to say that national identity in the Caribbean is more important than your color. I see that in places like Jamaica, Haiti, Puerto Rico and Trinidad. She is right. Being Trinidadian is a huge unifying factor that is more important than your color. HOWEVER, I have relatives who married to people from the Caribbean. I have spent a lot of time in the Caribbean. Color is HUGE. Beauty pageants, economic class, education and marriage are all connected to color. The lighter you are, the better your chances. Now, like the United States this is a product of black offspring of former slavemasters having more money and more access to wealth. So automatically the people who had more money were people of mixed race who in time translates to lighter skinned black people. I think light skinned and mixed people in the Caribbean are VERY aware of the color they are. One of by best friends is a white Haitian woman. She looks more like a Spaniard with straight hair and light eyes. She always says how men treat her differently and see her as a prize. So do my Jamaican friends who are mixed with Indian or Chinese. They are considered prettier. We must also emphasize this is the case here too. Music videos, our fashion magazines, Victoria Secret, our singers (Beyonce etc), all the ones considered more “beautiful” are often light skin. This is a problem in the entire global black community. I am surprised “Boo Boo Kitty” did not learn this until she was 18. I question that.

    • April 1, 2015 - Reply

      @K.C.

      Yes, in Latin America and the Caribbean, some people in those areas focus heavily on nationality including color too. In America, we are strident in talking about racial issues on many levels overtly as well.

      • April 1, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        Yes and a lot of good work is being done in Latin America and the Caribbean on this issue. Long way to go. Brazil in particular is interesting because they sell one image to the world but in reality blacks have the short end of the stick. Brazil has (I still believe) the largest black population in the “new world” outside of Africa. Yet, black people there do not end up as the famous Victoria Secret’s models. Those honors go to people like Giselle Bundchen who is of German descent. She has not native Brazilian blood. Her lineage is pure German. Yet, she is considered their most beautiful model? Silly. In America, we talk about racial issues I agree. I just wish the talk would translate to real change. I would love to see a dark sister get the fame and accolades that a Beyonce or Rihanna does. Or a big screen actress in blockbusters who is darker than Zoe Saldana. Hopefully Lupita will change the game. Waiting to see.

        • April 1, 2015 - Reply

          @K.C.

          Yes, it is definitely true
          that Brazil has the largest black population in the Americas. The book and the
          DVD “Black in Latin America” has great information on this issue. There are a
          lot of progressive people in Latin America and the Caribbean who want change,
          but change is not easy. One problem in Brazil is the showing of very white
          models like Giselle Bundchen in an excessive fashion when the majority of the
          people of Brazil are people of color. Afro-Brazilian Sister Benedita da Silva
          is one of the greatest living heroes of Brazil now. She is a fighter for racial
          justice, affirmative actions, and women’s rights too. The late Afro-Brazilian
          Brother Abdias do Nascimento was another great activist for black human rights
          too. We need real change beyond talk. That change will have to be structural
          beyond just individual as we face institutionalized racism (and poverty in
          America has been found embedded in the oppressive system). Sister Lupita
          changed the paradigm in my view. She is not only a beautiful dark, black
          Sister. Her intelligence, her eloquence, and her grace are inspiring. Regardless
          of our hues (as light, brown, and dark black people are equal and ought to be
          treated with dignity and with respect), we are one people. It is just that we
          want more dark Sisters to shine their gifts to the world. There is nothing
          wrong with that.

      • April 2, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        I agree with you, Truth. I understand the historical reasons for colorism in America but it just seems that it permeates every aspect of Black culture in America! I watched Dark Girls when it came out and it hurt me to the core. Beautiful, dark skinned women didn’t like their color, one woman said she was sad and scared her daughter was born dark skinned and it just broke my heart.

        • April 2, 2015 - Reply

          @AfroCapricornette

          I do believe that it seems to permeate every aspect of Black culture in America (even when that is not true), because America is center of Western culture. Many black Americans are viewed by some people in as representative for all black people globally. We, as black Americans, are scrutinized a lot. So, in many cases, some may minimize the evils of colorism in other places of the world while solely focusing on colorism in America. Yet, colorism is not found in every aspect of Black culture in America. The civil rights movement and the Black Power movement of the 1950’s to the early 1970’s was all about saying Black is Beautiful. That statement is revolutionary and the black American movements for revolutionary change inspired the South African anti-apartheid movement and other movements for social change in general.

          Black American culture is beautiful and diverse. Colorism is the antithesis of true, progressive black American culture. Black culture deals with jazz, gospel, sports, oratory, spiritual leaders, political activists, poetry, food, etc. I also feel that me, as a black American, can learn a lot from black Africans and vice versa. Learning wisdom is a life long process. The more that I learn about Africa and other black people in the Diaspora, the more spiritually strong that I feel as a black human being. The beauty of Africa and African culture is inspiring indeed. The more we learn about each other, the more common ground and solutions that we can establish as one black African people. At the end of the day, we are one people and we are all part of the human family. Dark Girls is a very sad, melancholy documentary, but it was necessary one as a means for dark skinned Sisters to express their stories. In that sense, change can come.

          • April 2, 2015 - Reply

            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

            I agree with your well structured comments. It always amazes me why Black American culture is so scrutinized by Americans and outsiders in general. I also learn from Black American culture and experiences as they are different from mine so I try not to discount others. I personally have never experienced colourism here in NYC, then again I’m not entering the entertainment biz.

            In grad school, an AA colleague of mine told me that I wouldn’t pass the “brown bag test”. That was the first time I’d heard the term. She wasn’t demeaning or whatever and I wasn’t offended. It was just a statement. The convo came about as she was telling me of Black sororities that employed this method and that it was done to her in college and that she “barely passed”. My mouth hung open lol.

            Maybe if Black Americans stop idolizing fair complected brethren, then “they” will learn not to prefer light-skinned over dark-skinned Blacks. I know it’s much more complex than that but just my naive thought.

            Dark Girls really, really got me. In fact, I went straight to bed after watching it lol. I’ve seen clips from Light Girls but that didn’t affect me as much, for whatever reason. That doesn’t mean their experiences were trivial.

            • April 2, 2015 - Reply

              @AfroCapricornette

              Black American culture is scrutinized a lot. One reason is that black Americans survived the Maafa, slavery, Jim Crow, and other evils. For the past 50 years, we have made great accomplishments, but we have a very long way to go. There are indeed cultural differences between black Americans, Africans, and other black people of the Diaspora. There are similarities too. We can respect our cultural differences and fight against the system of white supremacy at the same time.

              There are many black Greek organizations have have used overt colorism (or the brown bag test) many years ago. It is not the fault of real black culture for this. It is the fault of evil people who want to promote a nefarious system which oppresses all black people in general. Also, Black Americans have great intellectual curiosity to realize how evil and unjustified such colorist policies are. Tons of black Americans respect black people, regardless of a black person’s skin complexion. There must be economic justice, fairness, and compassion. So, this is complex issue.

              Light skinned black people have experienced racism and disrespect, but Dark skinned black people have experienced more colorism than lighter skinned black people. All black people, regardless of our hue, deserve freedom and justice.

              • April 2, 2015 - Reply

                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                So, my simple but naive question is this: how can colourism in the culture be stopped/eradicated?

                • April 2, 2015 - Reply

                  @AfroCapricornette

                  Colorism can be eradicated by many solutions. As I get older, I see that there must be multiple solutions.

                  One of the immediate things that we can do is to educate black youth on the beauty of blackness and their real history (I mean their real history), so they can develop their self actualization. Also, we have to defend our people in public and in private when someone makes an anti-black comment. We should work in real organizations who are doing great work in helping communities.

                  We can also establish ties with pan-African organizations, especially if someone is an international traveler. There must be more dialogues, more discussions, etc. so people can voice their experiences. We need to develop strategies, promote therapy for those suffering colorism, and just speak truth to power.

                • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                  @AfroCapricornette

                  Intraracism (I’ve just coined this term) in Black America isn’t going to be eradicated. Sad but true. Social media and internet have made matters worse.

                • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                  @AfroCapricornette

                  Just like black people cant stop racism alone, we cant stop stop colorism alone. It will take a radical change in thinking globally. Until it benefits the ones on top ( yt) it wont stop. What we can do as a people is to stop embracing their beauty standards, heal ourselves, and learn to create our own economic systems where we arent so dependant upon them. I cant say it will be easy because when we do things like this… look at Rosewood or the black wall street…..

    • April 2, 2015 - Reply

      @K.C.

      I totally agree with you here unless she was just naive or she stuck to a very small circle i find in impossible to not realize that color or your complexion makes a huge difference in the way you are treated i live in Brooklyn, NY there are a lot of people from all over the Caribbean there and a good hand full of them have bleached there skin, clearly because where they came from there was a color “issue”. Maybe the Caymen Islands is different but i highly doubt it.

    • April 5, 2015 - Reply

      @K.C.

      Black women should just ignore beige women in general, not waste brain matter on them. If some are cool or are your friends/family, okay. However, wanting to join a sorority or be accepted in some superfical way is pointless. All the successfull black women throughout history have all been dark-skinned. By success, I’m not referring to some generic Civil Rights or fighting for freedom. I mean business, CEO’s, board of directors, positions in govenment…..astronauts even. When have you ever seen a light-skinned billionoaire or astronaut….NEVER!!!

      • April 5, 2015 - Reply

        @Jane

        From the looks of your pic, you’re not “black” either. But neither you nor I gets to decide who’s black, and who’s not. But I will say that racist black ignorant chicks like you are the ones who should be ignored. Taking my own advice. … you just became invisible.

  6. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    Her comments are interesting. She is right that many light skinned people have experienced discrimination and racism. Yet, she ignores the truth that dark skinned people have suffered much more colorism than light skinned people in America, the Caribbean, and throughout the Earth. There is no comparison. The documentary “Dark Girls” shows the truth is very excellent detail about black people (with dark skin hues) have gone through a lot of oppressive in the modern world society. Colorism is definitely found in the Caribbean. Many lighter Haitian, Jamaican, etc. political leaders have greater privileges than other Haitians, Jamaicans of darker skin complexions. Grace has to realize that colorism is found even in the Cayman Island and it’s a problem that must be solved comprehensively. Many men who are color struck believe in the lie that lighter skinned black women are superior physically, so they could express those wrongheaded prejudices. We have to be real and keep it real. Grace Gealey has to keep it totally real and express the truth about how light skinned people are promoted more in the entertainment/music world than black people of darker skin hues. In Brazil, Afro-Brazilians are protesting the unfair representation of black images in Brazil. There are Afro-Colombians standing up for their liberation. That means that we are in a fight for our freedom. Regardless of our hues as black people, we face one common enemy (which is the system of white supremacy) and we want the solution for justice. True unity (not selfish individualism) must be promoted.

  7. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    I have never spent time I the Caribbean, so I don’t have direct exprience of how that culture works, but everything I have ever read notes the existence of colorism. What I think might be at play I this situation is that the Cayman Islands are small, and she probably knew just about everyone her circles. Given that, it was probably easier to be judge on her character as opposed to her complexion.

  8. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    Most countries that have indigenous people of African descent have this colorism issue. Even White/European people have different shades.

    I got to live in different continents, and I have to say the US Blacks take it to another level. Overboard. Light-skinned this Dark-skinned that. Social media and internet made it even worse. It’s almost like we’re our own worst enemies.

    Shit, we can’t even agree on the definition of what constitute light or dark-skinned. Plus, if we’re so gung ho about this issue, we should classify all Black people correctly then because there are 50 shades of Black.

    Is Gabrielle Union dark-skinned? What about Kelly Rowland and Lupita. Both Obama and Farrakhan are light-skinned but the POTUS is half-White half-Black, the Nation of Islam leader is not.Their experiences are different. So should we lump them together as just light-skinned or is there more? …

    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

      @ZORINO

      Gabrielle Union bleaches her skin. In person, she’s unrecognizable. Just a tidbit of info.

      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        She does??? Doesn’t look so in print. Hmmnnnn…

        • April 4, 2015 - Reply

          @AfroCapricornette

          Ive seen pics where she looked very light and her hair had blonde highlights and I assumed it was the lighting. Then my bff got back from a wedding where they had been sitting in the same row as Gabrielle and Dwayne and all she kept talking about was Gabrielles light complexion. Her sister was sitting closer to Gabby and didnt recognize her until she opened her mouth. She found that picture online that I had seen and said she looked exactly that color in person.

      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        aww really? shes so beautiful that makes me sad. 🙁

      • April 5, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        Really, though? I hope it’s not true.

        • April 5, 2015 - Reply

          @ZORINO

          I think it’s insane and I didn’t want to believe it. But, I’ve been dark skinned my entire life and without bleach, there’s no way that anyone is gonna see me on a sunny day in California looking the shade of Beyonce circa 1999.

          • April 5, 2015 - Reply

            @Love.tweet.joi

            In what movie does she have her natural skin tone?

  9. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    I don’t get why everyone is piling on her for her comments. I understand what she meant because I feel it too. As a Nigerian raised female, everyone around me was black, albeit different shades of black, from really light-skinned to gorgeous ebony black. Nevertheless, we all saw ourselves as Nigerian/Black African and colourism was never an issue; tribalism, OTOH is a different conversation. It wasn’t until I moved here that I was introduced to colourism, from AAs nonetheless! I’m dark-skinned and proud of it. I always knew who and what I was but it really wasn’t till I moved to America that I realized I was Black. It sounds crazy, I know! I’ve also lived in 2 European countries and I was never made to feel my race/colour…at least not to my face because I have a potty mouth.

    • April 2, 2015 - Reply

      @AfroCapricornette

      Are you really trying to say that colorism is not an issue in West Africa, when there are so many sad stories about so many Black women there are almost killing themselves by bleaching their skin? I never heard of a skin bleaching epidemic in Black America, have you? I am not discounting your experiences growing up, but just because you say colorism was not your problem does not mean it’s not a plague where you come from.

      And are you also saying you have lived on 3 continents, and you never experienced colorism/racism sickness until you encountered Black Americans? You were even in the racial utopia that is Europe (sarcasm font) and you were never “made to feel my race/color”? I live in NYC and have only had the n word directed at me once almost 25 years ago (and it was done indirectly). My daily interactions as a dark skinned Black woman for the most part are normal, albeit for the regular insanity that occurs in NYC. That doesn’t mean racism is not rampant in this fake liberal city.

      I have a potty mouth too, so you can gtfooh.

      • April 2, 2015 - Reply

        @vintage3000

        Ms Vintage or whatever you are, I really hope you are a young adult because I would hate to think a grown woman could be so rude. I will reply you politely as I was raised right. Grace stated
        her opinion based on her experiences and I stated mine too. You have yours as well based on life as an AA female in USA and that’s just fine. I live in NYC myself and my interactions, just like yours, are somewhat normal for a Black female.

        Where did I say Europe was a racial utopia? You see, this is where reading comprehension is vital. People just jump to inane conclusions without entertaining the other person’s thought. I said I was never made to feel my colour to my face, not that stuff wasn’t said behind my back but either way, I was never bothered.

        I actually agree with Truthseekers comments in that outside of USA, nationality is mostly considered. No one’s discounting colourism in America, heck, even India and some ME countries and Asia do it and they’re mostly white! Please do not claim to know about W/Afr…yes, bleaching occurs (Dencia, anyone??) but
        unlike in USA, family members are not ridiculed for being dark-skinned, bullying doesn’t happen like it does here etc. We are for the most part, homogenously black/dark-skinned.

        FYI, people who bleach there are actually ridiculed because it is just so obvious. So no, colourism is not a plague there just because a few insecure fools do it. In case you didn’t know, some ignorant light-skinned AAs mock Africans for their dark skin and accents, call us African booty-scratchers (whatever that means) and all that nonsense. It’s happened to family members
        that were new immigrants. Did they scream colourism? No. They were actually puzzled by the vitriol.

        • April 2, 2015 - Reply

          @AfroCapricornette

          Looking at this exchange between you and Vintage3000, a person whose views I tend to respect a lot, I think this is a case people with different life experiences talking past each other. Just like a lot of issues strike me differently because I am a man, issues strike people differently due to where they were raised and the culture in which they were raised. The more I see, the more I am inclined to just acknowledge that different folks can look at the same thing and see something different.

          • April 2, 2015 - Reply

            @Anthony

            Thank you for the mature comment. That was the foundation of my initial comment, that everyone’s giving her grief based on her experiences.

            I stated mine and everyone has theirs too. We should all learn to entertain the other person’s thoughts even if we may not necessarily accept them. Thank you again.

        • April 2, 2015 - Reply

          @AfroCapricornette

          “In case you didn’t know, some ignorant light-skinned AAs mock Africans for their dark skin and accents, call us African booty-scratchers (whatever that means) and all that nonsense”

          Yes I am aware of those ignorant brainwashed people. And I am not “claiming to know about West Africa” –I know how to read, and have also met more than a few African women here in NYC who have told me about their own family members who are stung by the bleaching epidemic. I am also aware that there are African women like Lupita, who has mentioned herself several times that she was ridiculed for her dark skin by other Africans. In Africa. Are you going to blame their ridicule on Black Americans also? Or just admit there are many Africans who have been affected by colonialism and racism as well. When I used to get my hair braided in African braiding places, I always wondered why there were often women working there with odd discolorations on their faces and hands and now I know they tried to bleach the black off of themselves, I guess they also didn’t know they were Black until they moved to America, huh? Just google skin bleaching, Africa etc. and it sounds like it’s a lot more than ‘a few insecure fools’.

          When a Black person (yes you are Black, sorry) says they have been in Europe and “wasn’t made to feel my race/color” until they encountered Black people in America–how do you not see how ridiculous that sounds? Did a Black American call you a derogatory name because of your complexion or where you are from? And that venom sometimes goes both ways. My Uncle Jerry was in the Peace Corps in the 1970’s and visited Ghana–He said because of his lighter complexion, many Ghanians referred to him with a derogatory word for lighter skin (i have no idea what it was) and whichever word they used for “slave” because he is Black American. He traveled there with the hopes of forging close relationships with the Africans he was tasked to work with, and he eventually did.

          • April 2, 2015 - Reply

            @vintage3000

            I suggest you read Anthony’s comment about different cultural experiences. I’m sorry for uncle Jerry and his experiences in Ghana. I hope you just see the irony of your comment, “Did a Black American call you a derogatory name because of your complexion or where you are from?” AA call Africans derogatory names and like Uncle Jerry experienced in Ghana, he got called same too. Like you said, the venom goes both ways unfortunately.

            “When a Black person (yes you are Black, sorry) says they have been in Europe and “wasn’t made to feel my race/color” until they encountered Black people in America–how do you not see how ridiculous that sounds?”

            Lmao!!! I KNOW I am black and dark-skinned too and damn proud of it! I even have a slight African accent just like Lupita. You know the number of ignorant AA that ask where I learned English, if we have planes in Africa, if he live in huts, etc?? No joke here. I just laugh and educate them that what the media portrays about Africa is not entirely true.

            My mum is medium toned (like the Prez) and is Black African as well but the number of AA that refer to her as light-skinned and insist that she is, is just amazing. Not that her colour has somehow won her the lottery here.

            Again, bleaching occurs, YES, no denying it but it is not a plague there as much as tribalism or nepotism are and I’m telling you this. Just because the braiders you patronized may bleach, doesn’t mean every African does. Sheesh! FYI, some Afr tribes are naturally fair complected.

            Back to Grace, those are her cultural experiences and it would be best if people respect them. After all, we all have our own. Unless you’re implying yours is the right one because it differs from hers.

            • April 2, 2015 - Reply

              @AfroCapricornette

              There is no unacknowledged irony–that is why I noted the venom goes both ways.

              “Just because the braiders you patronized may bleach, doesn’t mean every African does.”

              Where did I say “every African”? I am able (and have already) to note the rampant stupidity of many Black Americans when it comes to color issues, as well as the fact there are many Africans who suffer from it as well. You seem unable to even admit that it’s significantly ‘more than a few insecure fools’–and again, I did NOT say this plagues every African on the continent. And yeah I have met a few dark skinned and proud dark Africans as well (odd enough, they all attended college in either Europe or America). But this lack of self esteem is enough to make a LOT of African women suffer mentally and physically, which is something you seem unwilling to acknowledge. This is not an issue that plagues Black America only.

              Re: this discussion as a whole-I don’t have a problem with someone relaying their experiences, but not at the cost of dismissing everyone else’s. I did not watch the doc Dark Girls, because I am not keen on the overall feeling that all dark skinned Black women are borderline suicidal. As a dark woman I have fortunately not experienced the sadness and horrors many of those ladies have, but that does not mean I don’t acknowledge them as real. For someone to say ‘i didn’t know i was light skinned until…’ is certainly a valid pov, but when there is no mention of the larger context of intra racial colorism is where people will tend to ‘pile on’.

              • April 2, 2015 - Reply

                @vintage3000

                Africans that attended school abroad are lucky to come from middle-class to wealth backgrounds. Nothing to do with colour, everything to do with money.

                I believe most ppl from the Caymans are actually fair hence her comment. Correct me if I’m wrong but the way most countries are homogenously one race/colour, it might be same w/Cayman. Maybe they consider nationality as primary, I don’t know. Hence, her rude awakening on moving here.

                Colourism is a very delicate and sensitive issue in Black America and maybe she just didn’t want to go there. It doesn’t mean she’s unaware it exists. No doubt her complexion has helped her here (in entertainment/Hollywood) and I’m sure she knows that.

                You do have to admit, there is a culture shock ppl experience (Black/White/Other) on moving here. I think she thought her accent would be something to negatively affect her not realizing that her accent was secondary and colour was primary. Then again, she’s biracial, or so I read, but culturally Caribbean.

                • April 2, 2015 - Reply

                  @AfroCapricornette

                  I just looked at Wikipedia, and it says that mixed people are the largest group in that nation at 40% of the population. Whites and blacks are 20% each. The Cayman Islands have a tiny population of 54,000+. I guess my first post may have been right. It is a small place, and I could see where an aspiring actress or model would have known everyone in her circle. It also appears that most of the people she would see would be mixed like her.

                  • April 2, 2015 - Reply

                    @Anthony

                    Exactly, Anthony! My point all this while. Everyone around her was mixed/light-skinned. Whether or not she interacted with dark-skinned blacks in the country, well…

                    Imagine the culture shock on moving here and realizing that just maybe, opportunities came because of something out of her control. But 54,000 inhabitants?? It is tiny lol

                    • April 2, 2015 - Reply

                      @AfroCapricornette

                      I do think the point that if you benefit from a fair complexion, you take it for granted without thinking about it until it is pointed out to you is legitimate. I know it was that way for me when I first started becoming conscious of gender bias.

                • April 5, 2015 - Reply

                  @AfroCapricornette

                  “Colourism is a very delicate and sensitive issue in Black America ”

                  Colorism is a big problem with Black people throughout the entire freaking diaspora, including africa. At the very least, you should have been able to glean that from this entire thread.

      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

        @vintage3000

        Colorism exist to some extent but not like in the US. The equivalent dynamic in Africa would be Tribalism, which is still bad. I have yet to see or hear of people engaging in concepts such as Team Light-Skinned vs Team Dark-Skinned. In Africa people don’t really look at themselves as Black first. You’re Black as opposed to what? Everybody is Black in the country. If anything, you see yourself as Yoruba, Igbo, Ashanti, Kongo, Zulu, etc.

        For having lived in Europe a big part of my life I can say that when white Europeans discriminate against Blacks they don’t make a difference between light-skinned and dark-skinned blacks.

        So, I’m thinking the dark-skinned light-skinned dynamic is stronger here than in most countries. For whatever reasons. Even on the Tom Joyner Cruises they have light-skinned and dark-skinned teams during water gun fights. It’s meant to be fun and such but I haven’t experienced a similar activity in another country with a Black population.

        • April 4, 2015 - Reply

          @ZORINO

          “Colorism exist to some extent but not like in the US. The equivalent
          dynamic in Africa would be Tribalism, which is still bad. I have yet to
          see or hear of people engaging in concepts such as Team Light-Skinned vs
          Team Dark-Skinned. In Africa people don’t really look at themselves as
          Black first. You’re Black as opposed to what? Everybody is Black in the
          country. If anything, you see yourself as Yoruba, Igbo, Ashanti, Kongo,
          Zulu, etc”
          .
          Exactly! This is what I meant and one AA female reply with a knee-jerk reaction spouting off nonsense. Colorism is not a plague in Africa (I mean Black Africa, not North) just because a small percentage bleach. Tribalism is a larger issue there and is a different story, trust me. We are raised by tribe, nationality (e.g. Yoruba from Nigeria, Ashanti from Ghana etc). When you have money, power and connections, everything falls into place lol.

          Yeah, I’ve seen all these silly club flyers with team lightskin/darkskin nonsense and just smh…

          • April 5, 2015 - Reply

            @AfroCapricornette

            That “nonsense” being that color self esteem issues is a huge problem with a lot of african chicks-lol.

            Still in denial, but that’s ok.

            • April 5, 2015 - Reply

              @vintage3000

              Sigh. I really will not trade words with you since you seem to cherry pick words and claim to know about a region you know nothing about. I hope you don’t scream racism when white folks say a lot AA males are criminals or AA women are welfare queens. That is the same inane logic you’re using and I’m trying to get you to see. A minority behaviour does not make it endemic across the whole demographic.

              Just because a tiny minority bleach, it doesn’t mean colorism is a plague. FYI, those who are known to bleach are ridiculed because it is so obvious. Dear Lord, it’s like talking to a brick wall!

              Google the richest man and woman in Africa and see if they are bleached. Again, I’m referring to sub-Saharan Africa here. You think high school kids get in fights over color like they do here in America??? We’ve got our issues and colorism ain’t it, sister. Tribalism, religion, corruption are. That’s why we already have thick skins by the time we move here as young adults.

              I’m not in denial. You seem to blindly project AA issues onto Africans without realizing we have our own serious problems. Read up unbiased literature on Africa or just an African region to understand. The same way I read Nell Painter’s “Creating Black Americans” years ago to have a foundation of my brethren in America. Have a nice Easter!

        • April 5, 2015 - Reply

          @ZORINO

          “I have yet to see or hear of people engaging in concepts such as Team Light-Skinned vs Team Dark-Skinned. ”

          I have lived in America my entire life, and have never encountered this kind of ignorance in this country. Not saying it does not exist, but to say that this is characteristic of the majority of Black America is the exact same as saying all dark skinned Africans suffer from self hatred and bleach their skin.

          Whenever these convos come up I always wonder why Black America gets the brunt of the criticism from certain people. It’s usually immigrants who still live here who are unable (or unwilling) to see the color issues where they originated. I have met brown Dominicans of all shades who seem to get along with each other, but harbor some sick ideas when it comes to color, hair, etc. I think a lot of non-Americans get upset in these discussions because generally Black Americans are always so vocal about it. Everyone else likes to keep this ish under wraps.

          btw Tom Joyner has been an ignorant buffoon for decades for many reasons, I would expect coonery like that from him.

    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

      @AfroCapricornette

      You are so correct. I have been to other countries and like you said, if you’re black you’re black. Black people in other countries are so much nicer and way more friendlier. But here in the US, black women hate each other. Starting in school, they hang out in light skin dark skin clicks and look for every opportunity to start fights with each other. When you here about the stereotype of the angry black woman, they’re not speaking about black women from other countries, they’re referring to the mentally f**ked up black women born and raised here in the US.

      • April 3, 2015 - Reply

        @Nicole

        Exactly. And even though I understand the historical reasons, this colorism thing just rubs me wrong. Maybe it’s because AAs are a minority in America and the opportunities that were accorded light-skinned Blacks through the centuries. This is in contrast to homogenously Black nations where nationality is the main focus. Here, money, connections and power speak more than color.

        “When you here about the stereotype of the angry black woman, they’re not
        speaking about black women from other countries, they’re referring to
        the mentally f**ked up black women born and raised here in the US”.

        I’ve had white people tell me straight up (in interviews and networking events or just random office workers on my floor) that I’m “different” and where was I born/raised? When I tell them I was raised in W/Afr, they always say something like, “yeah, I knew you were different”. I always insisted on them telling me how I acted different because I think I act like every other well behaved person of any race. Deep down, I knew they were referring to the stereotype but could never get them to actually say it…and this just made me feel very sad and uncomfortable.

        • April 3, 2015 - Reply

          @AfroCapricornette

          Exactly. You behave like any other will mannered person of any race and the first thing white people ask is, “where are you from?”. I get a little upset because I feel that undertone of racism there, but then I realize that they’re not used to talking to or being around a black woman who doesn’t have a chip on their shoulder and a nasty attitude. It is sad and frustrating, but most of my frustration lies with black women like mmmdot who continue to perpetuate the stereotype as if it is something to be proud of. When I see another black woman being loud, rude, and embarrassing themselves in public, it also feels like a personal embarrassment and slap in the face to me. Many black women in the US feel they have the right to be rude and nasty to every person they meet because of racism in our society. They need to stop and ask themselves, what would their grand parents think of their behavior? How are they honoring the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and others like him?

        • April 4, 2015 - Reply

          @AfroCapricornette

          I’ve had white people tell me straight up (in interviews and networking events or just random office workers on my floor) that I’m “different” and where was I born/raised?

          That’s such bullshit and a backhanded compliment. Ive heard the same thing from yt ( one even went as far to tell me that my parents have been married for 30 years because I came from a bi-racial home- WTF? My mom is very very fair but she has 2 black parents) and although I fit the profile of a respectable negro ( I came from a 2 parent home, no kids out of wedlock, college educated etc.) I refuse to be ANY yt’s respectable negro! I love black people, I love myself and what Im here for is the enlightenment of Black people worldwide.

    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

      @AfroCapricornette

      lol @ ” because I have a potty mouth”.

      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

        @ZORINO

        Lol. I do if the situation requires it. I have a dry,sarcastic tone cultivated from growing up in England but quickly revert to my natural accent when angry or irritated. I can never seem to show my displeasure in a Downton Abbey fashion…lol.

    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

      @AfroCapricornette

      No ones piling on her for her comments. I was respectful and in turn she chose to be very disrespectful to me. Thats why she is getting the response shes getting. She lacks the ability to think critically and its sad.

  10. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    She’s light skinned, what the hell would she know about colorism? We’ve got light-skinned African Americans who will tell you that colorism doesn’t exist and/or they don’t have light skinned privilege. A better person to answer questions such as these would be a dark skinned person from the Caymen Islands. She even says she’s been “discriminated” against for being light-skinned. She obviously doesn’t get it.

    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

      @Whitneys Receipts

      “She’s light skinned, what the hell would she know about colorism?”

      What kind of intra-racist bs is that! That’s exactly the type of ignorance that keeps black people fighting and separated. Besides the crap that comes out of mmmdots mouth, that’s just about the most ignorant and truly racist comment I’ve read on here. Colorism is about black people discriminating against each other based off their skin tone. YOU and your obvious dislike of light skin black women definitely proves that COLORISM does exist.

      Btw, when she said she was “discriminated” against for being light-skinned, she was referring to treatment from mean angry black chicks like you.

  11. April 1, 2015 - Reply

    hmmm… ok. I’m about her color and I ll say it again, I do not feel that light skinned black women are discriminated against for being light. I really do not.Not in the way that dark skinned women and men are. Just because someones calls you light bright or light skinned or yellow.. that is not a slur. You may not like it ( I don’t) but it is not going to cut you like some of the things I’ve heard about dark women. I love my sisters, and we as light skinned women need to really examine our privilege in that regards so that we can truly come together. Black women we are beautiful and I love you.

    • April 2, 2015 - Reply

      @Staci Elle

      OK, so you’re saying it’s OK for darker skinned women to call lighter skinned women names and hurl insults at them just for being light skinned? I can’t even count how many times I’ve been called a yellow monkey or light skinned bi*** by another black female just because she didn’t like the complexion I was born with. I think blacks, especially black females need to stop with all the self hate. We get enough of that from everyone else.

      • April 2, 2015 - Reply

        @Nicole

        Nope, not saying that all. What Im saying is that personally Ive never seen anyone being degraded for being light. I haven’t been, if anything I’ve received compliments on my complexion all of my life. however I have seen dark skinned women degraded for being dark, so many times. And I also know that dark skinned people receive harsher prison sentences then light skinned people and are perceived as more dangerous.

        • April 2, 2015 - Reply

          @Staci Elle

          I’ve seen light skinned girls get stomped out by a group of browner complexioned females just for being light skinned. In high school three black girls picked a fight with another black girl because according to them, she wasn’t black enough to wear her hair in braids. People need to realize that being told that you’re not black or not black enough by your own people is hurtful and hateful as well. Black people will always be nothing in America because we can’t even get along with each other. I understand that darker skinned females get it worse from white society, but they need to realize that us lighter skinned sistas are not the enemy. When Rosa Parks got thrown in jail for not giving up her seat, the jail sign didn’t say Light skinned blacks here and dark skinned blacks over there. The thing that irks me, is that I have actually experienced more hate and discrimination from my own people than I have from whites.

          • April 2, 2015 - Reply

            @Nicole

            “Black people will always be nothing in America because we can’t even get along with each other.”

            Speak for yourself and only yourself, because you sure don’t speak for me and mine with this made up fuckery. You don’t get to generalize any manifestations of your self loathing and internalized white supremacy to all Black people as though they are “Black” traits. Speak for yourself. Mmmkay?

            How many of those Black kids you’re complaining about are going to block you from accessing adequate healthcare, food, shelter, and money over a lifetime? How many of those Black kids are going to block you from accessing employment, education, and voting over a lifetime? How many of them are going to dump toxic waste in your Black neighborhood? How many of those Black kids are hindering you from succeeding as an adult in ANY way? The only time I have ever had a black person personally hold me back is when they were trying to appease a white superior.

            Racism is a HUMAN RIGHTS issue. Stop diminishing it because your childhood resentment is affecting your ability to THINK RATIONALLY and grasp that fact. People really need to let go of childhood hurts, because HOLDING ON to the crap kids said and did to you and making it about your HURT FEELINGS when we’re sitting up here talking about HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS only makes YOU seem childish and petty. Grow up and read a book. Kay? Don’t diminish the seriousness of racism because of YOUR personal pettiness.

            • April 2, 2015 - Reply

              @mmmdot

              Hold up Biaaatch you need to back the fuck up with your fuckery! It’s apparent that you not only have some severe type of mental issues and anger issues, but you also need to pick up a few books yourself because reading comprehension is not your strong suit.

              AT NO POINT IN TIME DID I EVER SAY RACISM DOES NOT EXIST AND THAT BLACKS ARE NOT BEING HELD DOWN AND KEPT BACK BECAUSE OF IT.

              As a matter of fact you need to check yourself and my comment in which I mentioned racism and Rosa Parks. Your entire angry rant is absurd and has absolutely nothing to do with what was being discussed. I know more about racism, the civil rights movement, and human rights than an angry little wannabe attacking people psycho little maniac like you ever will. Childhood resentments??? Trick I have none. I don’t live in the past like you do. Tell me, how many years were you a slave? It’s ignorant ass blacks like you that I’m talking about. Always quick to attack other black people because someone in your past hurt yo po wittle feelings. It’s tricks like you that need to die off so the black community can move forward and better itself.

              THE ONLY CHILDISH AND PETTY person is you! Trolling the internet looking for every little opportunity to attack people with your perceived misconceptions. Trick what have you done for black people lately besides attacking other black people? Me diminishing racism, NEVER! I’ll leave that up to you whose apparently been blocked from accessing adequate healthcare, food, shelter, money, employment, education, and voting over your lifetime and also had toxic waste dumped in your Black neighborhood! You sure have a lot going on in that crazy hate filled head of yours. Let’s see how far YOU’RE HATRED FOR THE ENTIRE WHITE RACE will get you in life mmmkay.

              I’m sure all of us black folks who are doing something positive with our lives would love to crawl into that deep dark hole of self pitty that you wallow in but with your Kanye West size ego, there’s only room enough for you! I yes, I do speak for myself and only myself unlike you with your I AM THE BLACK GOD attitude. It is you who needs to grow up, read a book, and get some FAFSA to take your ignorant ass to college. It’s ignorant blacks like you and all the other self hating ones shooting and killing each other by the dozens who are holding us back. Until we get rid of hate filled filth like you, the black community will continue to destroy itself instead of bettering itself.

              Now you can take all that disrespect, mmmkays, kays, fuckeries, childhood hurts, white supremacy, YOUR personal pettiness, and your Kanye West size ego and shove it back up the shit hole it fell out of. You gets NO respect. That’s reserved for people with manners. One of the many things I’m sure your parents neglected to teach you.

              • April 2, 2015 - Reply

                @Nicole

                Face it, this is about what is wrong with YOU and YOU alone. Most of
                the black people I know are educated, well rounded, and don’t live the way you believe they do. You’re angry because you’ve obviously spent most of your life wishing YOU could be as “good” as white people and you have just never measured up. So stop making YOUR inferiority
                complex about all “black people.” “WE” aren’t inferior, YOU and all the people YOU KNOW are inferior. You want to see “Black pathology”? Look in the mirror, idiot. Why? Because TRYING and FAILING to engage in classism and respectability politics when you are CLEARLY nothing but uneducated, low-class, self hating trash with an inferiority complex does NOTHING but alienate you from other Black people – especially those who actually DO THEIR RESEARCH, know what they’re talking about can have SPEAK INTELLIGIBLY about the subject at hand.

                Everybody in my family has a college degree and most have graduate degrees. I have engineers, nurses, lawyers, and doctors in my family. Even though I don’t tend to have much in common with really “hood”
                people, and they did bully me when I was a fucking CHILD for “talking white”, being “bougee”, and being “stuck up”, since I’m ACTUALLY a MATURE ADULT, who isn’t BITTER, DUMB, and RETARDED like you I’m socially aware enough to know that not a one of those people is capable of preventing me from living in whatever neighborhood I want to, denying me a bank loan, passing legislation to keep me from voting, paying me less for doing the same exact job as a white person, or preventing me from getting a job in the FIRST place at most companies in America – ESPECIALLY in corporate America.

                It’s called being MATURE enough not to WALLOW in past childhood hurts. Because if I did, I would sound like you: a bitter, childish, petulant, moronic, self-centered IMBECILE that’s completely detached from reality. As an ADULT I’m MATURE and EDUCATED enough to know that white supremacy is a bigger threat to me than “ghetto black people.” DUH! ::Eyeroll:: And no one has to go all the back to slavery to find examples of racism, you fucking tard. Jesus, you’re stupid. When was the last time you read ACTUALLY read a book and understood all the words inside it – if EVER? You probably CAN’T read, lol. Moron.

              • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                @Nicole

                Deal with reality and not the shit you made up in YOUR tiny, minuscule, damn near non-existent, UNEDUCATED little peabrain. And if I were you I wouldn’t be worried about what kind of college anybody has been to when you can BARELY READ. You also don’t seem to understand the concepts of: researching an issue before speaking with authority on it, critical thinking, chronological thinking, or pretty much ANY form of THINKING or research at all.

                Are you intellectually and cognitively disabled or did you just not make it past the 5th grade in elementary school when WE ALL did BOOK REPORTS and learned to research issues so that we could speak intelligibly about them? Looks like BOTH, since your slow azz decided to wade into some shit that is CLEARLY too deep for your cracked out empty little head to grasp. I don’t do racism 101, tard. Instead of continuously showing your short yellow bus status, stay in the shallow side of the pool where you CLEARLY belong and keep it to the
                crayons and coloring books that you’re better acquainted with.You’re out of your depth, moron.

                • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                  @mmmdot

                  “short yellow bus”

                  She not only hates all light skinned females and white people, but she also hates mentally handicapped kids who ride the short yellow bus too. This ignorant things hatred knows no bounds. smdh.

                  • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                    @Nicole

                    Cocaine is a helluva drug..isn’t it folks? LMAO! Just looked at this cracked out moron!

                    Anyway moron, I repeat: you need to QUALIFY your self hatred. White people might be better than YOUR black azz and all the low-lifes YOU KNOW, but no white person is BETTER than me and mine and not a single one of the tactics of white culture actually make it SUPERIOR to black culture. You white identifying, self-hating, walking billboards for internalized racism can’t keep pointing the finger at other Black people, saying that this is a “we” problem, when it’s CLEARLY “you” problem. Fix yourself, you brokedown bitch.

                • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                  @mmmdot

                  *stands up and cheers in the corner…getting too loud…looks around and sits back in my chair*

                  • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                    @Love.tweet.joi

                    LOL! Sounds like you need to be on that little yellow bus with her.

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @Nicole

                      You really need to do your research, sis. Hurling insults is hurting your credibility. Open your mind. #readingisfundamental #googleisyourfriend #youmustlearn

            • April 4, 2015 - Reply

              @mmmdot

              LOL. This is simply a case of ignorance. The younger folk don’t know that there’s a systematic, oppressive WAR going on. It’s all in our heads. #newblacks = #willfulblindness

              • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                @Love.tweet.joi

                The larger systematic war going on is browner complexioned angry black women like you and mmmdot who feel they have the right to take their anger out on light-skinned black women for being born light-skinned. Your type of ignorance and racism is just as bad as the ignorance and racism of racist white people. Hope you grow up, and do yourself a favor by researching the history of black people in America. It’s apparent you know absolutely nothing about our history.

                • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                  @Nicole

                  Ha ha ha ha ha. You don’t belong here. You’re not smart enough, sweetie. I tried to help you, but you are a know-it-all. The anger you are feeling right now (coming from mmmdot and I) IS BECAUSE WE ARE TRYING TO SCHOOL YOU BUT YOU ARE TOO STUPID TO LEARN. SMH. I give up, dummy…carry on….

              • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                @Love.tweet.joi

                Girl, I’m in my 20’s, but I’ve been reading about Martin Luther King being in the Birmingham Jail since I was a kid. I’ve also read about other luminaries like Toussaint L’Ouveture, Ida B. Wells, Queen Nzinga, etc. My parents drilled into my head that there wasn’t something wrong with ME but the white people who were racially oppressing us and stigmatizing us because of racist myths stupid white people made up HUNDREDS of years ago. Unfortunately, psychotic, self-hating trolls like this one aren’t even NEW. During the Harlem Renaissance, Alain Locke called them “Brand New Negroes.” SMH. You don’t have to be light-skinned, dark-skinned, or anything in between to be offended by this creep’s anti-black, self hating comments. All you have to be is Black and socially aware. I repeat: she’s a toxic waste dump of uneducated stupidity, childishness, and self-hatred.

                • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                  @mmmdot

                  Wow. You’re in your 20’s!? Your parents must be extremely proud!

                • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                  @mmmdot

                  If more people knew about his letter from the Birmingham jail, they wouldn’t have the impression that he wasn’t militant, he was.

          • April 2, 2015 - Reply

            @Nicole

            Guess what? Everyone gets picked on or talked about. Especially if you are an easy target, if you are different, act
            different, speak different from everyone else and sometimes just because someone does not like you they will pick on you. As an adult, if you are STILL whining about someone “calling you names”, you really need to find a way to handle your business.

            • April 2, 2015 - Reply

              @mmmdot

              you can drop the mike and walk off stage now sis 😉

              • April 2, 2015 - Reply

                @Staci Elle

                Thank you, girl! She needs to stop making HER inferiority complex about all “black people.” No white person is
                BETTER than me and mine and not a single one of the tactics of white culture actually make it SUPERIOR to black culture. Maybe SHE’S inferior to white people, but not me. These white identifying, self-hating, walking advertisements for internalized racism need to stop pointing the finger at OTHER Black people and fix themselves. Period.

                • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                  @mmmdot

                  Bitch you should have dropped the mike a long time ago. Now you’ve only succeeded in showing the world that you are a truly fucked up mental case. Really? You have nothing better to do with your time besides attacking other black people on the internet because you deem them to be inferior due to their lighter skin tone? Your long babbling angry comments are laughable. No real content just a bunch of angry arbitrary nonsensical bullshit you made up about me to make yourself feel superior. Just shows how much of a fucked up angry nut case you are. Pretending like you went to college Lmfao! You wouldn’t know what an education is if someone slapped you in the face with it!

                  You pretend to be cultured and classy but your unprovoked attack against me proves you are anything but. It’s obvious you are nothing but a ghetto trash crack baby living in a fantasy world you made up on the internet. I would say you suffer from daddy issues but I’m sure you don’t know who your daddy is. Maybe you’re dealing with multiple baby daddy issues from being the freak of the week and polluting society with more trash like yourself. More babies means mo money for you right? Or do you prefer to make yours by trickin? I’m sure a loud mouth bitch like you would excel at that. No GED required.

                  But back to the real talk, apparently not only do you HATE all light skinned females, but you also feel as if every WHITE person in America has somehow oppressed you. You have an inferiority complex due to a lack of self esteem which is why you lash out and attack people for no reason. I make a comment about black people needing to stop with the self hate and violence towards each other and you turn it into, “She thinks whites are superior” bullshit. For someone claiming to be educated you are just about the dumbest trick I’ve ever had the misfortune of encountering. Seriously if you’re going to pick a fight with someone, you should at least get your facts straight and stop making shit up. I know you aren’t very bright and your reading comprehension is at a first grade level, but it doesn’t take a genius to look at my first comment and see that I never said any of the crap you accused me of saying. I want to know, what kind of mental illness causes people to read into and see things that aren’t there? I would ask you to point out in my comment exactly where I state that white people are superior and black culture is inferior but I’m sure your narcissistic chemically damaged brain is incapable of that. Maybe you can get your girlfriend Staci Elle to help you out. She seems to get turned on by trash like you. The majority of the crap you’ve claimed that I said is all a bunch of lies that you made up. Wouldn’t hold up in a court of law Mrs. Educated. I would ask why you would make up such lies then attack someone on the internet but it’s obvious from your other comments that YOUR HATRED OF LIGHT SKINNED women and all WHITES runs deep. Did a light skin chick steal your man? Were you raped by some white dude? Who knows what triggered your extreme hatred of others and self loathing of yourself. Don’t know don’t care but you need to seek some professional help. Seems like your mental illness might be on the verge of driving you to start seeking out and killing random light skin chicks and white people.

                  And what I said about blacks turning on each other, THANKS FOR PROVING ME RIGHT ^_^ “As an ADULT I’m mature and educated enough” Bitch stop lying ! YOU ARE THE POSTER CHILD FOR IGNORANT BLACK TRASH. Speaking of whining and crying about the past well, you obviously take the cake on that. Whitey did this and whitey did that therefore I can never amount to nothing. Bitch, gtfoh with that shit. The person you need to blame the most for your failures in life is yourself. Then you need to blame your mother for having you while addicted to crack. Bet you thought I was an easy target because I’m light skinned. Been dealing with bullies like you my whole life, but I always win! Tricks like you aint got nothing but a big mouth. We can see you’re a real shit talker on the internet but when faced with real adversary, you crumble like old dried up dog shit.

                  I’m upset that I’ve even wasted this much time on you cause your worth isn’t even equivalent to shit! At least you can get manure and fertilizer from shit but from you bitch….. NOTHING.

                  Btw, you and your lover Staci can keep the mike. Maybe you can do something useful with it besides attacking other black people for made up reasons.

                  • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                    @Nicole

                    It’s called being EDUCATED, you dimwitted tard. Try it sometime. But until you do, you need to QUALIFY your self hatred: White people might be better than YOUR black azz and all the ratchets YOU KNOW, but no white person is BETTER than me and mine and not a single one of the tactics of white culture actually make it SUPERIOR to black culture. You white identifying, self-hating, walking advertisements for internalized racism can’t keep pointing the finger at other Black people, saying that this is a “we” problem, when it’s clearly “you” problem. Fix yourself, low-life.

                    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                      @mmmdot

                      What kind of psycho comments at 4:13am just to talk shit about someone. mmmdot does! It’s apparent that your thought process is incapable of logical reasoning, so this will be the LAST time I WASTE TIME RESPONDING to one of your ASININE comments.

                      Every human being, white, black, Hispanic, Asian, even all the animals in the animal kingdom and the shit that comes out their ass are SUPERIOR TO AND BETTER THAN YOUR black azz because YOU are nothing but a SELF-hating Troll. It’s laughable that YOU actually think you are SUPERIOR to EVERY white person in the world. You sound just like a DUMB ASS RACIST WHITE person. That puts YOU, and THEM on EQUAL levels. I LOVE my BLACK CULTURE. But unlike you, I DON’T HATE OTHER PEOPLE JUST BECAUSE THEY ARE LIGHT SKIN OR NOT BLACK. You are a racist egotistical inferior bitch with the mental capacity and reasoning of a 4 yr old. I thought maybe you were crazy, but now I see that you’re just plain STUPID and you CAN’T FIX STUPID!

                      mmmdot = Walking poster child for the angry black woman with a nasty attitude and a chip on her shoulder who thinks the world owes her something so refuses to get up off her lazy ass and better herself.

                      Goodbye, and good riddance…. bitch.

                      • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                        @Nicole

                        Blah, blah, blah, you dumb, self-hating, ignorant bitch. Are you cognitively and intellectually disabled? Looks like it, since you decided you wanted to wade into some shit that is CLEARLY too deep for you to grasp. Don’t get mad because it’s CLEAR that you’re not as intelligent or as clever as you PRETENDED to be and the subterfuge is over. You CLEARLY don’t know ANYTHING substantive about ANY non-white people inside OR outside this country, so stop speaking with authority on subjects you CLEARLY can’t speak INTELLIGIBLY about. Instead of continuously showing your short yellow bus status, stay in the shallow side of the pool where you CLEARLY belong and keep it to the crayons and coloring books that you’re better acquainted with…Take it back to the short bus and stop pretending you ACTUALLY have anything intelligent, insightful, or educated to say on this subject. Mmmkay?

                        • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                          @mmmdot

                          LMFAO! I’m retired Navy Bitch. I’ve live in Panama, Iceland, Bahrain, Djibouti, Israel, England and I’ve been to more countries than oh why am I even wasting my breath on this uneducated THOT whose obviously never seen anything outside of her inner-city ghetto.
                          Everything you say has nothing to do with the article. Not getting sucked back into your bullshit. Get a life.

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @mmmdot

                      ouch.

                      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                        @Love.tweet.joi

                        LMAO!!! Sorry, I call it like I see it. White supremacist ideology coming out of TROLL with dark skin is STILL toxic. It’s like talking to a female version of Clarence Thomas. Ugh. This troll is spouting damn near no better than a racist white troll. She’s a toxic waste dump of uneducated stupidity, childishness, and self-hatred.

                  • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                    @Nicole

                    You need to check out the statistics, sis. The numbers don’t lie. See my post above. I looked for proof of how colorism affects blacks on a socioeconomic level and I found it.

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @Love.tweet.joi

                      That…creature might have dark skin, but as Frantz Fanon said, Black skin for a White mask is really a proxy of White supremacy. Deluded self-hating morons like her are completely detached from reality. They make it IMPOSSIBLE to have ANY kind of intelligent, let alone constructive conversations with them about ANY kind of systemic oppression because nothing they have to say has a basis in ANY kind of reality. She’s stuck on stupid, bitterness, and resentment from childhood and has the AUDACITY to act as though everyone has the negative, petty, childish complex she OBVIOUSLY has about skin color. Until she decides to fix herself and deal with their delusions, she needs qualify her self-hatred and only talk about herself as being inferior [because she CLEARLY is.]

                  • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                    @Nicole

                    Wow lol I see you mentioned me in your rant. Why? I have been nothing but respectful of your position even though I personally dont agree. And obviously if mmmdot hated light skinned chicks she’d have a problem with me because I am yellow as they come. Also I don’t understand how being homophobic came into this but damn aren’t we a lil beyond the idea that being called someones gf is going to be offensive? I know I am. Conversely, mmmdot is correct racism isnt insults going back and forth, racism has material consequences.

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @Staci Elle

                      LOl! Why would I not mention someone who cheers for and eggs on another chick who’s been harassing me and cursing me out for two days. Black racism at it’s finest. Please, don’t act so naive.

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @Staci Elle

                      This is what Frantz Fanon discussed in his book “Black Skin, White Masks”: A Black person merely in skin, but everything else – even to the point of their collective unconscious – is ‘white’. There are some Black people who are more white supremacist in their thinking than whites.

                      This person is EXTREMELY ignorant and it’s obvious that’s she’s filled to the brim with internalized white supremacy and internalized oppression. Don’t try to make sense of anything she says. What she says is completely irrational. Uneducated and deluded self-hating morons like her are completely detached from reality. You can’t have any intelligent or constructive conversations with them about racism, colorism, sexism or any kind of systemic oppression until they decide to fix themselves. A black face on white supremacy is STILL white supremacy.

                      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                        @mmmdot

                        The worst kind sis. I try to give sisters the benefit of the doubt. I try to gently educate instead of coming down hard like I do with yt. But she is doing much too much on here. To be honest I think her problems with other black women have been due to her attitude not her color.

                      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                        @mmmdot

                        Self hate in Black people is the worst. thats what internalized racism is. Its sad. I really try to understand my sisters even when I dont agree with their line of thinking, but this chick is truly sad. Im done with her.

          • April 2, 2015 - Reply

            @Nicole

            I will not deny your lived experiences, I will say that I have never seen that happen, not JUST for being light skinned. Even with all your saying light skin is still prized over dark skin and I wish you could see that those things that happened to you still dont make up for the longer prison sentences that dark people are subjected to, how they often are not picked for front office positions, and how they are perceived has not as as intelligent, and more dangerous. Sis, please understand that you may may been discriminated more by black people ( thats not my truth) but Colorism is just a branch on the tree called Racism, which white people perpetuate all day everyday worldwide. There was no colorism before we were exposed to yt.

            • April 3, 2015 - Reply

              @Staci Elle

              “There was no colorism before we were exposed to yt”. Agreed! But it’s now so endemic in the culture it’s ridiculous. I just heard of the word “redbone” recently and was told it’s a euphemism for light skin. It’s what all these gangsta rappers or whatever rap about.

              So now that Blacks are openly practicing colorism on their own kind, don’t you think/feel that the “powers that be” might use that as an excuse to continue the trend?

              • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                @AfroCapricornette

                They started it, why not continue it?

                • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                  @Staci Elle

                  I don’t follow. You mean we should continue the colorism trend?

                  • April 3, 2015 - Reply

                    @AfroCapricornette

                    This person is EXTREMELY ignorant and it’s obvious that’s she’s filled to the brim with internalized white supremacy and internalized oppression. Don’t try to make sense of anything she says. What she says is completely irrational. A black face on white supremacist ideology is STILL white supremacy. Period. Uneducated and deluded self-hating morons like her are completely detached from reality and you can’t have any intelligent or constructive conversations with them about racism, colorism, or any kind of systemic oppression until they decide to work on themselves.

                  • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                    @AfroCapricornette

                    No Im saying that Yt started it. We picked it up for survival ( marry lighter so your kids will get better jobs- my grandma was told that) and self hate purposes but YT will always perpetuate it, I dont care how many times I hear from dark skinned women that white people come up to them and compliment their complexion, they still perpetuate it though the way they hire, the way light skinned blacks ( really bi-racials) are chosen to represent black people in the media and the way dark skinned black are sentenced.
                    My bad for not being clear.

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @Staci Elle

                      Ah, ok. Makes sense now. Yep, see that a lot. Bi or multiracials representing Blacks. No doubt to appeal to the dominant race. Then again, we can’t go blaming ppl for a natural trait they have no control over i.e. light skin.

                      Grace moved here at 18 and no doubt got a culture shock with colorism. As to whether she was aware of its existence in Cayman, maybe not. Anthony said in one of the comments that 40% of Cayman inhabitants are mixed race, with blacks/whites about 20% each. So everyone she grew up with, interacted with was probably mixed too.

                      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                        @AfroCapricornette

                        Id never “blame” anyone for having light skin. I have light skin and I’m as black as collard greens and cornbread. however, I don’t care if almost everyone she came in contact was light, she had to come in contact with some dark skinned people in her lifetime and she has to have seen the material consequences of being dark in a colorist society.

                        • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                          @Staci Elle

                          Well, that’s a question one of these talking heads should ask then. She’s not stupid. She knows how delicate the subject is and will try to avoid it.

                          How many interviews of her have you seen? For me, this is the second print (not TV/radio) I’ve read with her. Methinks she knows this will be a top 3 question. Something like, “of all the Black actresses in Hollywood with name recognition and experience, why you?”

                          • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                            @AfroCapricornette

                            This is my first interview Ive really seen for her. As fas as I know shes married to timbaland and if I had to assume thats how she got her start.

                            • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                              @Staci Elle

                              She;s married to Timbaland? Didn’t know that. Huh…well, in that case it’s nepotism then, no? Timbaland is Empire’s Music Director and hooked his wife up with Lee Daniels and the rest is history. So was it colorism on the part of Lee Daniels who’s dark-skinned?

                              Or if GG had been dark and Timbaland’s wife, would she still have gotten it due to nepotism in the industry? Questions, questions…

                              • April 4, 2015

                                @AfroCapricornette

                                Dont know. As far as I know shes doing an good job with this part. I have no issue with her. I just wish she would engage in critical thinking .

                    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                      @Staci Elle

                      I just wrote the long version of that LOL.

                      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                        @Love.tweet.joi

                        I see you mama. 😉

            • April 4, 2015 - Reply

              @Staci Elle

              Exactly Sister.

              Have a Great Weekend.

              • April 4, 2015 - Reply

                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                I see you.. you stay blessed.

          • April 3, 2015 - Reply

            @Nicole

            “Black people will always be nothing in America because we can’t even get along with each other.” I agree that society sees us as “nothing,” but they sure imitate and think about us. Oh, the irony. Also, to me, the reason we are seen as inferior has nothing to do with us, but everything to do with White supremacy that needs something to feel supreme too.

            I think we often see ourselves and “nothing,” because we’ve internalized all the negativity we’ve heard for so long. That’s what makes me sad because we are the fountain that everyone drinks from, yet, we are hated and despised, not for what we’ve done, but for what’s been done to us. Sorry to get off track.

            • April 3, 2015 - Reply

              @noirluv45

              I feel you Sister.

              Just because society sees us as “nothing” doesn’t mean that we are nothing. We are somebody. We fought back against Confederates, slave owners, and other evil racists. We made inventions, and came out to promote justice for our people. We are not inferior. The more we learn about our real history and our real culture, the more inspired that we are in living out our lives in a positive direction. We have the responsibility to do what is right. Also, black people collectively should never be blamed for environmental racism, for racism in general, for discrimination, for imperialism, and for the criminal injustice system.

              I will never have a defeatist attitude, because that doesn’t work and it’s a slap in the face to our ancestors. We will be victorious in the future by working hard, sacrificing, resisting evil, and standing up for the truth. It is ironic that evil people mock us, but they want to try to be like us via them tanning, by them using various surgeries, and by them even mimicking our culture. Yet, they can never duplicate us. Our black souls are precious and we will defend our human rights.

            • April 3, 2015 - Reply

              @noirluv45

              Finally an intelligent response. Thank you. When I said, “Black people will always be nothing in America because we can’t even get along with each other.”, I was referring to all the colorism and internal hatred that we project upon each other. Some psycho chick named *mmmdot* some how interpreted my comment into “white people are superior”. Anyhoo, what I was saying, is that blacks in America are the only ethnic group that does not stick together and help each other out. Every night on the news, you hear about the dozens of young black people murdered by other young black people. Every ethnic group in America has it’s own little niche carved out. They have Little Italy, China Towns, Korea towns, whole areas that look like little Mexico with everything in Spanish. Even the Muslims have their own little thriving areas. These people have their own businesses and employ their own people. But us blacks are too busy bickering and fighting with each other. We have ghettos. With all the celebrities and major sports stars you would think we would have been able to advance ourselves just a little bit. Of course I understand that racism is a big part of the reason why we are behind, but there comes a point when we need to say, ‘screw everyone else, lets work together and do this for us so our children can have better futures’.

      • April 2, 2015 - Reply

        @Nicole

        Professor Margaret Hunter, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Mills College:

        “It is tempting to characterize the problem of colorism as equally difficult for both light-skinned people and dark. Dark-skinned people lack the social and economic capital that light skin provides, and are therefore disadvantaged in education, employment, and housing. Additionally, dark skin is generally not regarded as beautiful, so dark-skinned women often lose out in the dating and marriage markets. On the other side, light-skinned men and women are typically not regarded as legitimate members of their ethnic communities. They may be excluded from, or made to feel unwelcome in, community events and organizations.”

        “At first glance, it may SEEM that there are equal advantages and disadvantages to both sides of the color line. Upon closer examination, this proves to be UNTRUE. [Emphasis mine] Although exclusion from some community organizations may be uncomfortable psychologically or emotionally for light-skinned people of color, it rarely has significant material effects. More specifically, emotional turmoil about ethnic identity does not have significant economic consequences. However, the systematic discrimination against dark-skinned people of color in the labor market, educational institutions, and marriage market create marked economic disadvantages. Without minimizing the psychological trauma of exclusion from ethnic communities, it is important to clarify that the disadvantages of dark skin still far outweigh the disadvantages of light.”

    • April 2, 2015 - Reply

      @Staci Elle

      Yep. I agree. This is an from an article written by Professor Margaret Hunter, a sociologist at Mills College:

      “It is tempting to characterize the problem of colorism as equally difficult for both light-skinned people and dark. Dark-skinned people lack the social and economic capital that light skin provides, and are therefore disadvantaged in education, employment, and housing. Additionally, dark skin is generally not regarded as beautiful, so dark-skinned women often lose out in the dating and marriage markets. On the other side, light-skinned men and women are typically not regarded as legitimate members of their ethnic communities. They may be excluded from, or made to feel unwelcome in, community events and organizations.”

      “At first glance, it may SEEM that there are equal advantages and disadvantages to both sides of the color line. Upon closer examination, this proves to be UNTRUE. [Emphasis mine] Although exclusion from some community organizations may be uncomfortable psychologically or emotionally for light-skinned people of color, it rarely has significant material effects. More specifically, emotional turmoil about ethnic identity does not have significant economic consequences. However, the systematic discrimination against dark-skinned people of color in the labor market, educational institutions, and marriage market create marked economic disadvantages. Without minimizing the psychological trauma of exclusion from ethnic communities, it is important to clarify that the disadvantages of dark skin still far outweigh the disadvantages of light.”

      (http://www.mills .edu/academics/faculty/soc/mhunter/The%20Persistent
      %20Problem%20of%20Colorism.pdf)

      • April 2, 2015 - Reply

        @mmmdot

        I see u 🙂

    • April 7, 2015 - Reply

      @Staci Elle

      yeah but those taunts are usually in elementary school. once these women get to high school and/or graduate they realize that their skintone is preferred worldwide

      • April 7, 2015 - Reply

        @chanela

        Was this comment to me? No shade but I don’t understand how it relates to what I said.

      • April 8, 2015 - Reply

        @chanela

        I dont understand your comment. I said I never have seen anyone degraded for having light skin. “lightbright” redbone, and yellow are not insults and people know it.

  12. April 2, 2015 - Reply

    At first, I wanted to give her the benefit of doubt, but it just does not add up. She knows that she is a good looking, light skinned woman, and she knows her look has opened doors for her.

    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

      @Anthony

      Naomi Campbell is/was the highest paid and most well known black super model in history. Should she apologize for being brown skin or is it only light skin women who need to apologize?

      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

        @Nicole

        Where did I say anyone needed to apologize?

  13. April 2, 2015 - Reply

    Colorism is a GLOBAL issue and is part and parcel of globalized white supremacy. Colorism is a facet of racism and racism can be INTERNALIZED.

    “How does colorism operate? Systems of racial discrimination operate on at least two levels: race and color. The first system of discrimination is the level of racial category, (i.e. black, Asian, Latino, etc.). Regardless of physical appearance, African Americans of all skin tones are subject to certain kinds of discrimination, denigration, and second-class citizenship, simply because they are African American. Racism in this form is systemic and has both ideological and material consequences.”

    “The second system of discrimination, what I am calling colorism, is at the level of skin tone: darker skin or lighter skin. Although all blacks experience discrimination as blacks, the intensity of that discrimination, the frequency, and the outcomes of that discrimination will differ dramatically by skin tone. Darker-skinned African Americans may earn less money that lighter-skinned African Americans, although both earn less than whites. These two systems of discrimination (race and color) work in concert. The two systems are distinct, but inextricably connected. Although many people believe that colorism is strictly a ‘black or Latino problem’, colorism is actually practiced by whites and people of color alike.” – Professor Margaret Hunter, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Mills College

    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

      @mmmdot

      Thank you, by using that quote, you said it better than I could!

      • April 3, 2015 - Reply

        @elle D.

        You’re welcome, girl!

  14. April 2, 2015 - Reply

    Though I understand why people get the false idea that race-mixing will FIX racism, the problem is that we still live in a white supremacist society that irrationally stigmatizes and dehumanizes people with dark skin. The idea is that if we all mixed together and became the “same color” then no one would be racially discriminated against anymore because we’d all be “the same.” But genetics STILL make racially mixed people darker or lighter. No one will be “the same”.

    For every society that has had extensive racial mixing in the past 500 years:

    – the phenotypes would not disappear – they are only recombined into new combinations of phenotypes.

    – A new colorist vocabulary is invented to replace what may have formerly been “racial” designations, eg, hair type, eye colour, skin tone

    – money and wealth have some impact on one’s “racial” classification for social purposes.

    – marrying “up” or “down” is related to both wealth and to phenotypical characteristics (eg, skin tone)

    The white supremacy hierarchy will continue to operate as colorism rather than strict racial categories. The REAL solution is eradicating white supremacy.

    • April 2, 2015 - Reply

      @mmmdot

      You’re officially my sisterfriend in my head.

      • April 2, 2015 - Reply

        @Staci Elle

        LMAO!!! Thank you, girl! ;- )

    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

      @mmmdot

      Preach Sister 🙂

    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

      @mmmdot

      That’s it!

  15. April 3, 2015 - Reply

    The majority of these comments make most of y’all sound like you’re just jealous of Grace Gealey. Jealousy and envy will get you nowhere in life. Belittling her life because she’s not black enough for most of you. How pathetic. smdh.

    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

      @Nicole

      That often stems from Internalized Oppression which plays right back into colorism, a vicious cycle. I will be glad when we can band together to fight the good fight, but when that day come? I surely do not know.

      • April 3, 2015 - Reply

        @elle D.

        I think what Grace was trying to say is that where she’s from, MOST the black women get along and treat each other a bit more fairly than black women in the US. I have traveled the world, and in most other countries you’ll see light and dark skin blacks hanging out together and getting along. But here in the US, dark skin black women mostly stick with each other. They view lighter skin black women as the enemy. They stare you down for no reason, just waiting for you to make eye contact so they can pick a fight. It’s a big culture shock to go from friendly faces, to people, your own people mad-dogging you just for saying hello or giving some other kind of greeting. Black American women are some of the meanest most angriest women on earth. It’s shameful and embarrassing how we treat each other.

        • April 3, 2015 - Reply

          @Nicole

          I hear you, it is all shameful. We should rise above the pain that White Supremacy caused as a united front, but that will be the day.

  16. April 3, 2015 - Reply

    Just to make sure I follow, ‘Colorism’ is something Blacks do to themselves, correct?

    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

      @Justmythoughts

      Well, you could say that, but it did not start with us. Colonialism and such is the culprit, and unfortunately, many people of color have been brainwashed.

    • April 3, 2015 - Reply

      @Justmythoughts

      No the hell it isn’t:

      “When whites are guilty of colorism”

      http://www.washingtonpost .com/opinions/african-americans-still-face-colorism-based-on-their-skin-tone/2014/11/07/8a2ac124-607e-11e4-9f3a-7e28799e0549_story.html

    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

      @Justmythoughts

      and latinos and asians… any non white cutures touched by yt.

    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

      @Justmythoughts

      Do you understand now, dearie? Or still confused?

  17. April 3, 2015 - Reply

    My family is from Haiti and shades are definitely noticed. there are different names to describe every different combination of shade, facial features and hair textures. I haven’t noticed too much discrimination or assigning value based on these features lately (although we have been in the US/Canada for decades and have bee influenced by those cultures).

    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

      @permafrost

      When I went on vaca to the Dominican Republic, the lighter shade women had better jobs at the resort (like concierge jobs).I kept telling the brown women how beautiful they were and I could tell they were getting weirded out. LMAO. Oops. #accidentalgirlcrushes LOL.

      • April 4, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        lol! I want to go there and stock up on their conditioners! I would buy luggage just to fill with hair products, YES!

        • April 5, 2015 - Reply

          @Staci Elle

          I didn’t even know about Dominican products when I went! I just want to go back. AH, those were the days…

          • April 5, 2015 - Reply

            @Love.tweet.joi

            Let me know when you do pretty please! lol

  18. April 4, 2015 - Reply

    First of all, back in her home, most people R dark skinned and light skin is a minority not given special attention. She had to come here to get that special attention.

    • April 4, 2015 - Reply

      @Guest

      That’s so surprising tho. If light skin is in the minority, then it would seem like people would make a big deal of it. Asians and Indians make a big deal of it. Puerto Ricans make a big deal of it. Hell, even in the DR it seemed to be a big deal. I can’t argue with anyone on this because I’ve never been there, I’m just surprised, is all.

      • April 5, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        I watched Dr Gates “Black in Latin America” series on YT years ago and in DR, a couple of black ppl swore they were “indio” not “negra”…from Naive Amer not Africans. I laughed…why? They were darker than I was with kinky coily hair! If they weren’t speaking Spanish, i swear I would’ve said he was in an African nation.

        • April 5, 2015 - Reply

          @AfroCapricornette

          The Dominican Republic, that’s a whole other ball game. I watched the Dr Gates “Black in Latin America”. It’s a really interesting piece.

    • April 7, 2015 - Reply

      @Guest

      I do not agree with her statement but FYI
      A large portion of the the Cayman Island is light skinned in fact much lighter than her and a lot of the people are distantly related to each other the island is small with a lot of European antecedents
      Please do some research before posting nonsense

  19. April 5, 2015 - Reply

    I think black women should just ignore beige women in general, not waste brain matter on them. If some are cool or are your friends/family, okay. However, wanting to join a sorority or be accepted in some superfical way is pointless. All the successfull black women throughout history have all been dark-skinned. By success, I’m not referring to some generic Civil Rights or fighting for freedom. I mean business, CEO’s, board of directors, positions in govenment…..astronauts even. When have you ever seen a light-skinned billionoaire or astronaut….NEVER!!!

    • April 5, 2015 - Reply

      @Jane

      I dont know what the fuck your saying but Im “beige ” and I have two black parents so Im ( and any other light skinned bw with black parents is) as black as anyone.What is your motive for adding to this conversation Jane.

      • April 6, 2015 - Reply

        @Staci Elle

        Hold up! Someone PLEASE pass Jane a photo of Rosa Parks.

        • April 6, 2015 - Reply

          @Love.tweet.joi

          lol Thanks sis
          Im still trying to understand what her motive is for all of these comments. When a ww comes on a bw focused site to add to a conversation about colorism ( which favors yt at the end of the day) I wonder what their motive is.

    • April 5, 2015 - Reply

      @Jane

      You may have GOOD intentions but ignoring beige women in general is a kind of misguided advice, imho. Black is Black, and people should be able to co-exist w/o being stuck on on the whole light-skinned dark-skinned nonsense.

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