Yesha Callahan

Don’t Be Mad When The Grammy’s Don’t Acknowledge You But You Don’t Support Black Award Shows

Getty Images

Getty Images

Yesterday Omarion walked the fine line between f-ck boy and boy in his feelings when he went off on Twitter about being allegedly snubbed for a Grammy. Let us let him explain:

Oh sweet little Maybach O. The only one acting like you’re new to this is you. If memory and internet research serves me correctly, Omarion has consistently been recognized “by the game.” The problem is he’s not seeking acknowledgement, he’s seeking white affirmation.

See, Omarion has gotten props from the black community since his B2K days. B2K’s debut album peaked at #2 on the Billboard 200 and #1 on the U.S. Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs albums chart. The group’s second album, Pandemonium!, debuted at number ten on the Billboard 200 and at number three in terms of Top R&B/Hip Hop Albums, with the lead single, Bump, Bump, Bump, peaking at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

As a solo artist, Omarion’ debut album, O, reached #1 on the Billboard 200 and he received a Grammy Award nomination for Best Contemporary R&B Album. So why, sir, are you in your feelings? Yes, “Post to Be”, an essentially pop track about eating the booty like groceries, was certified platinum and reached the Top 20 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. But please don’t act like the Grammy’s never acknowledged your chosen destiny. Especially when you don’t care about other entities that consistently do.

This year, Omarion, Jhene Aiko, and Chris Brown won best collaboration at the Soul Train Awards. Do you think he showed up to accept his award? Nope. He’d much rather sit at home and cry over a bunch of white people not acknowledging his so-called greatness rather than appreciating the black entities that do.

That’s why Omarion can miss me with all the talk about being the underdog in the industry. Not only does he sing songs that are catchy yet forgettable, he doesn’t even care when his own people recognize the chart-topping success of his pop tunes. If a rant like this didn’t work for Nicki Minaj, Omarion should know it most certainly won’t work for him. And until he stops seeking validation outside of his loyal demographic and appreciating the support they’ve given him over the past 10 years, he’ll never be happy. And we’ll never take him or his silly tears seriously.

  1. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    ???? This is cry baby fuck boy season for real. I bought both b2k albums as a child and this niglet has the nerve to be mad at the lack of support. How about go back to making quality music, get off reality TV and maybe something can change…

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @C.

      Lmaaaaoooo ?????

  2. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    I cosign with this article and the writer. Charlemagne said this morning that black artists rather go where they are tolerated than celebrated and that’s part of the problem here. O needs validation from the white man, that’s what it is.

    “one of the greatest R&B collaborations ever” I had to laugh at that quote too ? it’s a great song but you’re stretching it.

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @Mahogany

      Its a sad day when I agree with charlemange.

      • December 8, 2015 - Reply

        @Anonin

        Indeed.

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @Mahogany

      The song ain’t even great. It’s catchy and mediocre af. We won’t be singing that sh*t in a year.

      • December 10, 2015 - Reply

        @♎Lauren♎

        Nailed it. The song is a throwaway.

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @Mahogany

      Is he even worth being celebrated by Black folk? See “eating the booty like groceries” comment above.

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @Mahogany

      But Omarion is not one of those people. I always see him at the BET and Soul Train awards. In fact, that’s the ONLY time I see Omarion

  3. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    Omarion????? knee grow please

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @Terrence Nelson

      That’s exactly what I was thinking… Kneegrow puleeeez! LOL

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @Terrence Nelson

      Oh my I hate that word.

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @Terrence Nelson

      TEARS! Real ones! ????

  4. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    GO FIND A HOBBY OMARION

  5. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    This is why the music industry is dying. These days artists expect to be rewarded for mediocrity. A Grammy award is a symbol of musical excellence. “Eating the booty like groceries” does not meet that standard.

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @hatecreatingusernames

      “Eating the booty like groceries”

      lol

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @hatecreatingusernames

      And at that moment, Omarion knew he had delved into mysterious, bold lyrical hinterlands that few men dared to venture. Placing his pen and lyric pad on his desk, he pushed his seat back in silent wonder.
      “Eating the booty like groceries,” he repeated aloud. I think I just made my mark on eternity. I shall be flooded with gramophone statues! COME, IMMORTALITY! I EMBRACE YOU!!!!

      • December 8, 2015 - Reply

        @LogicalLeopard

        LOL!

      • December 8, 2015 - Reply

        @LogicalLeopard

        LOL x 2!

        • December 8, 2015 - Reply

          @Noirluv45

          LOL.

          Goodnight Sister.

          God Bless You.

          • December 9, 2015 - Reply

            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

            Good day, brother! God you too, Truth.

            • December 9, 2015 - Reply

              @Noirluv45

              Thank you Sister.

              We will keep on keeping on.

              • December 9, 2015 - Reply

                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                We sure will, brother.

                • December 9, 2015 - Reply

                  @Noirluv45

                  🙂

      • December 9, 2015 - Reply

        @LogicalLeopard

        Lol! But apparently it was Jhene Aiko that came up with the line.

        • December 9, 2015 - Reply

          @Kema

          Over a table strewn with lyrics and empty bottles of absinthe, Omarion wept silently. He knew that art was pain and sacrifice, but nothing had ever prepared him for sharp gnawing of inadequacy deep within his soul
          “This song,” he lamented, “I opened every artistic vein I had to offer, spilling every precious, crimson drop of the ichor of creativity upon these pages. Yet…..the song is incomplete. It is not whole. It is not….everything it is ‘pose to be….Alas, perhaps it was not meant to be. ”
          Dark clouds gathered in his soul, and the only light available emanated from the fireplace. He then knew what he had to do.
          Yet, as he took the pages of lyrics toward the fireplace to be burned and forgotten, he was startled by the crash of his door being flung wide.
          He looked toward the entrance, expecting to find Poe’s raven, but instead found that rare songbird, Jhene Aiko, framed in light like a vision that door.
          With all the gravitas she could muster, she uttered a single, life changing phrase:
          “Eat the booty like groceries.”
          Omarion stood astonied for a moment, before melting to the floor in rapturous joy. The song was saved! His sacrifice had meaning. And soon….the world would be touched by the simple elegance of that one phrase.

          • December 9, 2015 - Reply

            @LogicalLeopard

            Haha!!! Too funny.

            • December 9, 2015 - Reply

              @Kema

              *LOL* Thanks! I don’t think I’ve ever heard this song before, so when I first heard about this story, I thought he had this stunning comeback song/album that didn’t get mentioned.
              I was familiar with the infamous line from the song, because I think I’ve seen some memes or gifs online with it. So when I finally put two and two together, it was like, “Boy, go sit down…” You may look slightly like Marvin Gaye with that beard, but you are NOT Marvin Gaye…..
              “Oh, mercy mercy me…..
              With these newfangled groceries, no, no…”

      • December 10, 2015 - Reply

        @LogicalLeopard

        I died twice! LMBO

      • December 11, 2015 - Reply

        @LogicalLeopard

        BYE. LMFAO

    • December 10, 2015 - Reply

      @hatecreatingusernames

      Harry Belafonte said the same thing about Dorothy Dandridge in an interview. We look for adulation from white sources, but can’t/won’t accept confirmation/affirmation when it is coming from your own black sources. I guess a nigga like” Y’all niggas ain’t the one that signs my check, Massa does”,and we all know that what massa says is golden right? Why can’t respect of person or people be equal/mutual?

  6. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    The author is correct we love to look down on our own .I did not watch or support the Soul Train Awards because of R.Kelly but thats another matter ,Take for instance the BET Awards this is seen as a running joke in the black community , but I watched this years rep broad casts and have to admit other than being too long , it had a better flow, more professional production and better performances than say that Sloppy God awful MTV awards that Miley hosted and Nickey Manaj was all in her feelings about
    Anyhoo isn’t this the dude that announced the birth of his son on twitter by saying his son had ” good hair ?

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @blogdiz

      I totally agree.Black people need to stop begging for white acceptance.These awards aren’t for us anyways.When I use to watch the Bet Awards many of the artists didn’t even show up to get their awards but they are always there for the white awards that is tolerating them being there.

    • December 9, 2015 - Reply

      @blogdiz

      Agreed. I started watching most of the award shows on BET a few years ago, and honestly their shows are better than the mainstream ones.

  7. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    BOY BYE.

  8. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    Too many people view the Grammys as the barometer of every form of musical talent (which isn’t the case at all). There are plenty of underrated, extremely talented musicians in the world. Our people invented music and Omarion’s comments show insecurity and immaturity, because your talent should speak for itself. A grown man shouldn’t whine about some award show. A grown man should just handle his business and stand up for his people. That’s commonsense. Also, not having a Grammy doesn’t mean that your music is worthless. Instead of some lusting for a Grammy, they should believe in their craft and respect their own dignity. Black award shows have praised Omarion’s music for over 10 years. Now, he has flipped the script in a desperate fashion. Therefore, we don’t need white mainstream affirmation. We need more black solidarity. Loving our own institutions is righteous.

    • December 8, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      It is hard to see the light (righteousness) when you stay in the shadow of oppression. Maybe he needs to take his lips off of the booty long enough to lift his head up and see.

      • December 8, 2015 - Reply

        @John Henry

        I agree. With his wealth, he can use that wealth to read books on consciousness, ally with activists, and advocate more progressive avenues for his community. Him complaining about Grammy will not solve anything.

    • December 10, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      PREACH! Omarion snubbed the legendary Soul Train awards. This is the same guy who was thanking “God” on IG for giving his son “good hair” a few months ago. Insecurity and self-hate at its best. SMH

      • December 10, 2015 - Reply

        @Dee

        Exactly Sister.

        Omarion’s comments definitely show massive self-hatred. His comments about hair is evil and beyond the pale. Self hatred is never healthy mentally, emotionally, or spiritually. Soul Train is a big stable of black culture. He wants to be accepted so bad by the Grammys, but we want total justice.

  9. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    welp

  10. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    “Post To Be” was a big summer hit and should have been nominated, imo. And that “eat booty like groceries” line by featured female R&B singer Jhene Aiko was kinda a big deal.

    The rant is uncalled for, though.

  11. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    His lil Grammy rant not with standing; did anyone consider that maybe his absence from the STA was due to his displeasure with the fact that the new “He Who Shall Not Be Named” would be performing??? Just a thought…
    I had the same initial reaction when I learned of his absence on another site, before having a chance to read the article, but if Kenneth “babyface” Edmonds is at the STA surely Omarion couldn’t possibly be under the impression that attending said show is beneath him. In fact it would have been an excellent chance to network with a producer that undoubtedly could have help him along the way with aspirations, OK more like catapulted considering nor Mr.Edmonds or any artist he has ever worked with are begging for Grammies. I would find it difficult to believe he has achieved even this level of longevity in such a fickle and viscious industry and would be capable of being unaware of that fact and is also surrounded by individuals who failed to point it out!!! I think his absence was very deleberate, and now that his “rant” has further highlighted it, I am curious to see what his explanation will be….
    Then again I may be giving him too much credit…

  12. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    “Post To Be” is a nice, catchy song but too often, mainstream shows want to cram minorities into one or two EEO-mandated token slots.

    Taking a minority genre of music as an example, metal bands are almost never represented at the Grammys so that type of music has its own awards show system.

  13. December 8, 2015 - Reply

    First, do people still care about the Grammy’s? The Grammy’s is not the high standard of celebrating musical talent like it once was in fact it is on par with a lot of these other award shows. And looking at the nominee list this year a lot of people were snubbed. Secondly, I wholeheartedly agree with black artists need to support and go to Black Award Shows that highlight and express Black excellence instead of being a token to these mainstream award shows. Stop giving these people power, money and ratings. If they aren’t showcasing you don’t go and surely don’t beg or rant pay them dust. Personally, I think our award shows are light years better I haven’t actively watch a mainstream award show in awhile but catch the highlights of the artists I like. Post to Be was a bop to do a little two step too but the best R&B collaboration of all time…side eye.

    Furthermore, I think a lot of Black artists need to wake up, I don’t know if they see the writing on the wall but I see mainstream media and the entertainment industry are trying to phase them out and limited them for a newer, younger AND whiter version of stars.

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