Yesha Callahan

Anthony Mackie Thinks “Black Dudes With Dreadlocks” Can Lead to Racial Profiling and Police Violence

In an interview with The Grio, Anthony Mackie sat down to discuss his new film Black and White –and also shared his views on police violence, dreadlocks and the Selma Oscar snub. Check out his comments and video below.

On racial profiling and dreadlocks:

“Like my nephew wanted to grow dreadlocks. I’m like fine, I’ll sit you down and I’ll watch The First 48 with you and everybody you see on that show, that’s doing something wrong, they’re black dudes with dreadlocks. So, do you want to be seen as part of the problem or do you want to be an individual?”

“Let’s just say you have locks and you walking down the street. The police pull you over and say you fit the description of somebody. You start yelling and arguing with the cops. Next thing you know you pressed up against the wall going to jail for something you’re not even involved in just because you look like somebody and you don’t know how to handle yourself,” Mackie said.

On The Oscar’s and Hollywood:

“People are just tired of being bombarded with race right now,” says the actor. “So everybody is shying away from certain topics and certain movies. If you look at all the movies and actors that are nominated, they all gave damn good performances. “Me specifically, if thats something I want, I have to step my game up. I have to do better movies and I have to act better.”

“If you look at all the movies and actors that are nominated, they all gave damn good performances. Me specifically, if that’s something I want, I have to step my game up. I have to do better movies and I have to act better. Hollywood believes that there’s no market overseas for black actors. “They say that about Denzel Washington, they say they have no foreign value. If we’re not financing and doing our own stories, we can’t expect to see ourselves come award season.”

Since the release of his interview with The Grio, Mackie has received massive backlash. The Selma and Black and White star has been called a “house Negro”, and even a “sell-out” on social media for his comments.

Check out the full interview below.

Photo Credit: Getty

  1. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    I guess being apart of the Hollywood set one has to be careful what they say in regards to sensitive social issues.

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @Mary Burrell

      His naivete is stunning. My first reaction was, “Is he from here?” I never met a black person so inexperienced in being black. Especially one who looks “fukwitable”. I can’t pick my jaw up. I’m stuck. You think he has experienced it and he’s playing dumb? He has to be, right?
      *Rocks back in forth shaking head*

      • January 22, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        “Love.tweet. Joi: I think he’s playing dumb at least I hope he is

      • January 22, 2015 - Reply

        @Love.tweet.joi

        The OJay’s said it all: “For the love of money, People will steal from their mother. For the love of money, People will rob their own brother…..Don’t let money fool you!”

        Yep!

  2. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    Nothing unusual here. Just another day of ‘blame the victim’. If dreadlocks suggest criminal intent or activity, then the observer is prejudiced against a certain hairstyle. Its not lost on anyone that a dreadlock wearer is more likely to be african-american. Will not wearing dreadlocks keep african-american men safe from “mistaken” racial profiling ? Who knows? They see black, then we see red … as in the blood of another youth bleeding out a life that didn’t need to be taken.

  3. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    I hope and pray for his sake he is never on the receiving end of racial profiling

  4. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    All I can say is that simply being big has made white people fearful of me. I honestly don’t care about trying to appear “non-threatening” because the threat is a figment of the imagination of random racists.

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @Anthony

      @anthony: have you heard of the book whistling Vavaldi

      • January 22, 2015 - Reply

        @Mary Burrell

        @Anthony:So they would know he had culture

        • January 22, 2015 - Reply

          @Mary Burrell

          It’s called, playing the game and knowing who you are dealing with. It is actually extremely smart move. Getting out of that box. Doesn’t mean you still can’t be profiled but, you confuse some when you recognize certain things for sure.

      • January 22, 2015 - Reply

        @Mary Burrell

        I have not heard of the book, but it certainly is plausible.

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @Anthony

      All I will say is, I know a big black dude who goes through pains trying to appear non-threatening. It’s so effing annoying. Black girls wouldn’t date him – which is fine with him – he married an asian and black girl.

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @Anthony

      Funny…thats a fact I had to realize myself when i got older. I was like are you serious? So now, just as a pre-emptive measure, I try to put on a fake smile when I go to the school every day to pick my kids up. But even that is not enough.

  5. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    I’ve seen many episodes of The First 48. I can’t say I’ve ever seen a surplus of Black men with dreads. Maybe I missed those episodes. We’re all entitled to our opinions. His just seems like his own biases are being projected.

  6. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    Look at the interviewers face! He’s irritated.

  7. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    Did he graduate with Pharrell Williams? You know, from New Black University!

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @B Cooper

      Preach.

      • January 23, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        Stfu

        • January 23, 2015 - Reply

          @Lorenzo griffin (ihaveastalker

          You can’t make me shut up. I will speak up like a grown black person. You need to show some maturity and some respect. That’s real.

          • January 23, 2015 - Reply

            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

            I never threatened to make you. Everyone hates you and would appreciate if you would though.

            • January 23, 2015 - Reply

              @Lorenzo griffin (ihaveastalker

              You don’t even know how to spell your own screen name. Go back under your bridge, troll.

              • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                @vintage3000

                gag on your father.

          • January 23, 2015 - Reply

            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

            this is a abusive sociopathic troll. It trolls everyone, and clutchmag needs to ban it.

            • January 23, 2015 - Reply

              @disqus_6sinns1216

              Exactly.

    • January 23, 2015 - Reply

      @B Cooper

      It may not be right. But African-Americans have to pick and choose our battles. As an AA man, I would never wear a hoodie inside a bank.
      Do for the Vine! I ain’t gonna do it. Do for the Vine! I ain’t gonna dot it. . .

  8. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    I don’t think Mackie is naive. I just think he’s another Don Lemon who believes if you dress “right”, speak properly and act a certain way, you won’t be harmed or harassed by police officers. He’s bought into the same thinking that many whites (and blacks) like to spout in situations like this.

    As far as his views on racism and movies, yeah, I’ve been reading how people are tired of slavery or civil rights movies. But I’ve yet to hear people being tired of hearing about the Holocaust or films that look to the past. Only when it comes to our Holocaust (slavery) and our past. People want us to forget about our history and to “get over it already.” But yet when it comes to the Holocaust or other atrocities in history, we’re told “to never forget.”

    His saying that he and other black actors/directors need to step up their game if they want to be nominated is just ridiculous. I don’t know how many undeserving white films, actors and directors I see get nominated every year. Talent really has nothing to do with it in many instances. I remember a few years ago a black blogger did an excellent story on how rigged the Oscars are, esp. against “black” films. A quality black film will often be overlooked for Oscar promotion by a studio in favor of some trite film. One example that was used was (I believe) Legally Blonde. If anyone has seen that film, you know it didn’t deserve Oscar consideration. But that didn’t prevent the studio from making the rounds to promote it.

    Anthony Mackie just hasn’t has his black moment with the cops or Hollywood yet. I’m sure he’ll be singing a different tune once he does,

    • January 23, 2015 - Reply

      @shybookworm

      I’ve had my black moment with cops while living in Amerika and yet I totally agree with him, but then I’m from the Caribbean and here cops are 99.9 percent black and respectability for self and others is a given.

    • January 23, 2015 - Reply

      @shybookworm

      Oh yeah, his “NI!#@ wake up!” call will be coming shortly—he better hope he can keep some Black fans after this as well.

    • January 23, 2015 - Reply

      @shybookworm

      “But I’ve yet to hear people being tired of hearing about the Holocaust or films that look to the past.” Yeah, but how many of these movies have hit the big screen compared to other movies that expand the knowledge of those people. Like I stated above, I don’t have a problem with these types of movies, but that cannot be our only story. That’s what irritates me.

      • January 23, 2015 - Reply

        @Noirluv45

        Exactly Sister.

  9. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    I am a Millennial and many Millennials harbor some of the
    respectability views of Anthony Mackie. This “New Black” ideology is more
    pervasive than I thought. It doesn’t matter if a Brother wears dreadlocks or
    not. That Brother can still be killed by a cop if that cop wants to kill that
    Brother. Unapologetically black means that we are black and we couldn’t give a
    care what anyone else thinks about our blackness. Also, we, as black people,
    never invented institutionalized racism. We have to know the origin of the
    problems that we face in the first place in order for our problems to be
    solved. Not to mention that superbly qualified black actors and black actresses
    have not been nominated or they have not been awarded. Denzel Washington never
    won an Academy Award for his role of Malcolm X in the movie “Malcolm X.” It is
    ironic that mainstream society wants us black people to be accepting of others,
    but they never lecture non-blacks to be accepting of us in a higher level. In
    the final analysis, we should love our individuality, but we should not ignore
    the struggle. The struggle is real and justice is not solved by trying to accommodate
    a system that doesn’t respect us. Justice is wrong by us struggling and
    fighting for our human rights and for our right to be ourselves without
    apology. We don’t have to apology for our dreadlocks, for our melanin, or for
    our flavor (for swag). We are Black.

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      I have no idea what Anthony Mackie is talking about. It’s deeper than a black man ,walking around with dreads. Also, Bob Marly had dreads. It is a very spiritual thing. Was their something wrong with him having them? I’m just trying to understand his analogy.It does not make sense.

      • January 22, 2015 - Reply

        @CourtneyrrR

        I understand where you’re coming from. I don’t understand where he’s coming from either. I know plenty of black people with dreadlocks who are super intelligent, down to Earth, and great people. He feels that folks with dreadlocks will have a higher risk of experiencing racial profiling, but racial profiling is inherently wrong regardless. Just because a black person has dreadlocks, doesn’t mean that a black person’s human rights should be violated. Mackie stereotyped his own people.

        • January 22, 2015 - Reply

          @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

          It’s just stupid. It’s as stupid as a person saying if you are black, and you speak well, you are an uncle tom or whatever stereotype you want to include. If you are a black woman, brown,dark, you are loud , aggressive, angry etc. It has nothing to do with anyone else. Each person is their own individual. One person with dreads could be a criminal, the next not. All white men with a baldy are skin heads etc.

          Listen, Mackie knows better, he is trying to keep jobs.Keep that money rolling in.He is no Jesse Williams or Common, that is for sure.Like , you can still tell the truth and make money.

          • January 22, 2015 - Reply

            @CourtneyrrR

            Exactly. I agree with you 100 percent.

            Goodnight Sister Courtney.

            God Bless You. 🙂

            • January 23, 2015 - Reply

              @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

              Likewise. Keep teaching.:)

              • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                @CourtneyrrR

                Thank you. I will keep on teaching. 🙂

          • January 23, 2015 - Reply

            @CourtneyrrR

            I have to roll with this statement “you can still tell the truth and make money.”

            Anthony Mackie will be forever scared in my mind. I love Comic Movies, but when I see him on the screen, I will definitely be looking sideways at him. In dominoes, we have a saying….”All money at good money”.

            • January 23, 2015 - Reply

              @John Henry

              i’m going to agree with you. He is a very talented man but what he said was dangerous. He is talking about a certain perception but with racist, it has nothing to do with one kind of perception. So, all black men stop wearing dreads, does that fix the problem? No it does not. You have to put the blame on the people who created the hostile stereotype.They have to change.

              • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                @CourtneyrrR

                “You have to put the blame on the people who created the hostile stereotype.They have to change.”

                There it is!

                • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                  @John Henry

                  Every problem has a starting point. Every one .This is not hard. If people are serious about fixing WHATEVER issue that causes others hurt, pain, you have to start at the beginning. I recall me saying this once or twice on newsone. You have to start from what happened first, who set the tone to gain an idea what the true issue is in order to fix conflict.So a black man walking around with dreadlocks is not the issue.

      • January 22, 2015 - Reply

        @CourtneyrrR

        That’s cool that you saw Selma. 🙂

        I will watch it in the future in DVD form. You know me. I knew Selma was excellent. Everyone said that it was a great film. I love civil rights films and documentaries myself. I never get bored looking at them. Yes, every young black man and woman should see it. We have to continue to fight for the right to vote. The Supreme Court recently gutted some parts of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The film showed the courage of not only Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., but of Bevel, SNCC, black women, and other activists who contributed to the Selma voting rights struggle. Even Malcolm X supported the Selma effort. Ava Duvernay should be encouraged and the hit pieces against her were immature and desperate. We all send prayers of protection for her.

        • January 23, 2015 - Reply

          @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

          SELMA really is an amazing ,stunning film visually, the message and story. The film did deserve an Oscar Nod in my opinion.It was so darn meaningful and it came across as such. It had me tearing up at the end with tears of joy and pain because it made you understand the magnitude of what they were dealing with.Real life.

          Ava killed it. 🙂

          • January 23, 2015 - Reply

            @CourtneyrrR

            I am so happy that you have enjoyed the film SELMA Sister
            Courtney.

            The movie has a lot of dialogue, creativity, and it has
            excellent historical value. The message and the story is a human story. It is
            story about diverse people coming together to fight for voting rights and
            equality. This fight for equality is as ancient as ancient times, but it is as
            clear and relevant as the water found in streams. Also, I heard people crying
            in the theaters when watching the movie too. The movie dealt with the bombing
            of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, Malcolm X,
            the Nobel Peace Prize, and other events. The violence found in the Edmund Pettus Bridge was the
            expression of police brutality. We have to confront police brutality today in
            our time. I will definitely look at the Selma film. The film only received a
            nomination of Best Picture. We are dealing with real life. Hopefully, the film
            can inspire more people to stand up and speak up for consciousness, for
            freedom, and for justice. Many people of many backgrounds were involved n the
            Selma movement. Their sacrifices should be known. As you have mentioned before
            accurately, people of many colors fought for the rights of black people and we
            to acknowledge that truth. Black people deserve respect, because our dignity as
            black people is priceless. Dr. King, SNCC, and other fought for our rights. I
            am glad that Ava Duvernay said that she didn’t want to make a savior movie.
            That made my day when I first heard her said that, because a movement is not
            the product of one man. It is the product of many people coming together on one
            accord.

            Ava Duvernay did a great job.
            🙂

      • January 22, 2015 - Reply

        @CourtneyrrR

        Good. I will make sure to watch this one, and let my family watch it too.

        You are right too. It is our history. Sometimes it seems that the only black movies that people approve of is a movie full of blacks acting like clowns. No disrespect intended to the comedy genre, I’m just saying, anything serious and we sick of it. But like you said, that is our story. So why can’t we tell it. We should. Just like all of the other cultures tell their story. To most people, race is never an issue unless the race is black. They are ok with
        asian movies, asian accents, French movies, french accents, british movies, british accents, but then when it comes to black…then i’m sick of these racial movies.

        • January 23, 2015 - Reply

          @John Henry

          Hey John 🙂 You are right. Love your analogies. :)Perfectly stated.I so serious. For me, I was thoroughly impressed with SELMA. All around. Martin was a very smart man. Black man. He knew exactly what he was doing. Even when most couldn’t understand why he did what he did, in the way that he did it. Malcolm too and I don’t and never did pit one against the other. That was a time were the situations with black people ,were very complicated to tackle when it came to calling out the constitution so it had to be dealt with intelligently. Also, the gov’t was not going to allow Martin and Malcolm to work together. That would of been to much force to get black people together to attack the hypocrisy of the U.s at that time. Funny though, as Truthseeker pointed out,

          How dare they try to amend certain aspects of the voting legislation when it comes to black today. No black person alive has no excuse to not get up and vote. We cannot allow them to turn back the clock. At the same time, we can’t be falling into traps that they set up to keep us from voting. We have to remain aware. To many people died and sacrificed their lives to keep us moving forward. They would not of done so if they did not love us and did not think that we were worth it. So we have to act like we care..

          • January 23, 2015 - Reply

            @CourtneyrrR

            I was taught to love Martin as a child. Then when my eyes were first opened, I was exposed to the view that he was a placed as a scapegoat to pacify the black man. The FBI had just gotten rid of Malcolm X, and now they had the BPP spreading across Black communities like wild fire. The black panthers were teaching about constitutional rights, and giving the community strategies to deal with the system of white supremacy, including the right to bear arms and defend yourself. MLK was positioned in direct opposition to this more militant movement. I was taught that MLK was the pacifier.

            But as I grow older and learned more about life, I realized that MLK was not just one person. He did not act alone. He was supported by a nation. Thousands marched with him. His movement was real, and so was his accomplishments for the advancement of civil rights. Also when you read his speeches, you will find that he was a rider too.
            Both MLK and BPP served a great purpose towards the advancement of our people.

            • January 23, 2015 - Reply

              @John Henry

              I know right!!!!!!!!!!! 🙂 Martin could turn up for sure. He just had a different way of going about change.He knew how to use them against them.Thats the kind of stuff I admire.This takes a certain kind of vision. None of them were wrong. As I continue to believe, whether it was Bpp, Martin, Malcolm, they all had their way and each one of them helped to advance all of us in different ways.All of them were seriously super intelligent. You go b back and just listen to those men and women who had superb understanding. That is what I admire. The bigger picture. Martin was the least threatening but didn’t take it by brute force although that action is always needed during certain times.He took it with them bowing down. Love it!!!!!! lol. Again, intelligence. This is why I say as african americans in this country who come from so many diverse backgrounds and experiences, we all have our ways of eradicating the system because what the majority of us all agree on is that their is a problem with the system. If their were a black Mt Rushmore, it would not be Martin or Malcolm or the Bpp, it would be all of them side by side on the monument. I don’t think you can erase Malcolm and what he stood for. Nor can you erase what the Bpp stood for and did. All of them were warriors in their own right. None of them were wrong and all accomplished the unimaginable given our history and how the AFRICAN AMERICAN started from nothing ,given nothing..Not given that climate. I mean, we seriously do not understand how serious the civil rights movement actually was. How could we? They did all of the hard work for us. It just puts a smile on my face to know as African Americans, we had the best, brightest, strongest to help change a nation and make it look inward at itself for doing wrong.A legitimate movement and fight fought from so many different angles. We still have ways to go but how far and what they accomplished is a testament.We should not be looking down upon it nor should we be allowing others to make light of it.

              Martin was 39 years old, that is within the range of our age group now when he was murdered with a wife and kids. So young he was.Malcolm, same thing.Bpp. They were unbelievably strong, smart, wise, family oriented and understood building a strong foundation. We need to get back to that.We have plenty of examples to follow. WE should never allow anyone to openly disrespect these great men and women.I am also going to say that their were some really decent white people as well, who sacrificed their lives too.They don’t go unrecognized. The Freedom Riders, James Earl Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner,Viola Liuzzo, and all the other countless people who gave their lives for something that should of never been an issue in the first place. Voting rights. smh. Sorry, that film got me.

              • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                @CourtneyrrR

                You have shown great words and facts Sister Courtney. 🙂

                Preach Sister.

              • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                @CourtneyrrR

                If that film got you, then it must have got you in a good way! Great points.

              • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                @CourtneyrrR

                Did yaw see this video yet? This brother breaks down police terrorism in our communities. It is worth watching.

                http://www.worldstarhiphop(dot)com/videos/video.php?v=wshhiE1zs15d2amJPYY6

              • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                @CourtneyrrR

                It’s easier to catch flies with honey than with vinegar.

                • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                  @Marc Menard

                  True.

                  • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                    @CourtneyrrR

                    Good Evening Courtney.

                    The movie Selma has galvanized and inspired people from all over.

                  • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                    @CourtneyrrR

                    Have a Great Weekend Sister Courtney.

            • January 23, 2015 - Reply

              @John Henry

              Those are excellent words Brother John Henry.

              When I was younger, I did not know that much about the strong militancy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. We all knew that Malcolm X was militant before and after his Hajj. When I got older, I found out about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s more militant views. Both Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. played very important roles in the black freedom movement. Dr. King wanted to use love not as a means to bow down to white society, but to use love to defend our human rights and to stand up for justice. Malcolm X changed rapidly ideologically from 1964 to 1965. Malcolm X made many speeches, but when he tied the economic exploitation to Western powers and when he went into foreign nations as a means to build up alliances (as a means to try to make America accountable for its crimes against black Americans), then he was soon assassinated. The BPP was an extension of the Black Power Movement. The BPP had guns and talked about self-defense (which is a human right).

              Yet, the FBI wanted to stop them, because of their revolutionary ideas and they were making results. The BPP were cleaning up the communities, they were providing children with breakfast, they were giving health care to black people, they were helping the elderly, and they were establishing other community development programs which were helping the people. When these things were happening, the FBI illegally suppressed them unfortunately. The Black Panther Party also was strongly anti-imperialist. Dr. King was killed in the midst of him opposing the Vietnam War and trying to get his Poor People’s Campaign fully established. Getting civil rights and voting rights encoded in law is one thing, which was great.

              Yet, the establishment hated Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. overtly when he opposed their war in Vietnam (which was a civil war. Herbicides, napalm, and other evils were found in that unjust war) and when he called for the radical redistribution of political and economic power. Dr. King was a threat and newspapers criticized him for his courageous stand against the Vietnam War. I always viewed Dr. King and Malcolm X’s views as converging before they passed away. Both men wanted an end to the Vietnam War, wanted the growth of black institutions, they critiqued capitalism explicitly, and they wanted a radical change in society. Dr. King gave militant speeches too (like his Beyond Vietnam speech and his Three Evils of Society speech back in 1967).

              I have great respect for Dr. King, Malcolm X, the BPP, and others who stood up for the freedom of black people globally.

              • January 23, 2015 - Reply

                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                Great words truth, and thanks for expanding on your words with perspective. You tied they movement together well.

        • January 23, 2015 - Reply

          @John Henry

          John, it can’t be our ONLY story. WE have a larger story to tell. Yes, it is a part of our history, but so are Charles Drew, Madame C.J. Walker, Benjamin Benneker, etc. Why aren’t these stories told?

          • January 23, 2015 - Reply

            @Noirluv45

            Good Afternoon Sister Noriluv45

            Our story is very long. It spans thousands of years. We have to show the stories of the men and women that you have listed and then some.

      • January 23, 2015 - Reply

        @CourtneyrrR

        Marley had dreadlocks because he was Ras, not because it was some ‘spiritual’ thing. He had a religious reason. Locks create problems in the Caribbean even. Call me bouge cos I aint ghetto, sorry.

        • January 23, 2015 - Reply

          @Marc Menard

          The Rastafari movement is an Ethiopian-Hebrew spirituality that arose in the 1930s in Jamaica.The wearing of dreadlocks is very closely associated with the movement, though not universal among, nor exclusive to, its adherents. Rastas maintain that locks are required by Leviticus 21:5 (“They shall not make baldness upon their head, neither shall they shave off the corner of their beard, nor make any cuttings in the flesh.”)

          It has it’s roots in” SPIRITUALITY”. So, it is about some “spiritual” thing. I am an African American woman but I do respect others and speak on what I know…And what I know is that, locks , have a spiritual meaning for those who take it seriously. I’ve watched enough docs to know that Locs are associated with this way of life that has spiritual meaning.

      • January 23, 2015 - Reply

        @CourtneyrrR

        You know, I’m all for showing our struggle, but I’m sick of it being all we see. We are more than the Civil Right’s Movement; we are more than slavery. We are the first people on this earth, and every other person comes from us. We built this country, yet we are only giving credit when it comes to civil rights, music, and sports.

        We need to show that we created and built this country; that’s why I’m sick of the “We shall overcome” movies.

        • January 23, 2015 - Reply

          @Noirluv45

          Of course it should not be the ONLY thing we continue to see but it is very important for the generation after us and after them to be reminded visually what they sacrificed. Unfortunately, they are not being taught. They must remain connected to what the civil rights movement was about . The moment that they are not, is the moment that everything is lost. They are trying to turn it back right before out eyes because they know that we are not as connected as the generation before us. So , like the Holocaust, it has to be shoved down their faces as much as possible. I do agree with you that, our history is vast and it continues to not be told ..We have to demand that they do. It’s more to us than just slavery and civil rights.

          I would love to see big money projects about African Dynasties, AFrican American warriors, Buffalo Soldiers, good Sci fi films, good stories,films about our scientist, inventors,businessmen and women etc because these stories are true and they helped to CHANGE the world. To think that white people were the only inventors is absurd.Many times, the things that we see today, we originally created by a black man or woman and it was stolen. So slavery and civil rights films should not be the only movies made for African Americans. All the rest that you spoke about, like everyone else, should be included. 🙂

      • January 24, 2015 - Reply

        @CourtneyrrR

        “I have no idea what Anthony Mackie is talking about. It’s deeper than a black man ,walking around with dreads. Also, Bob Marely had dreads. It is a very spiritual thing. Was their something wrong with him having them? I’m just trying to understand his analogy.It does not make sense.” I know what he is talking about and he is right se Bob Marely was a entertainer a international celebrity and back in the 70 one of my favorite artist although back then most black American didn’t listen to his music [true, fact] now back to the subject I understand what he is saying and it is valid, as a parent or love one it is our duty to give our young people the truth the facts and prepare them about how to operate in the “now” and “the environment we live in today”, for instance when one of my sons was a honor student, suburban teenager sometimes I would catch him leaving the house with a rag on his head and his pants pull down and I would say to him son you can go out there looking like you are a thug and you are not a thug but when they treat you like you are a thug you ain’t going to like it, he mumbler around pace around make some changes and go on, fast forward to when he was in medical school he had did some work in a mental health institution and a patient he had been aware of latter got shoot and kill by a policeman and it bothered him, it hurt him, matter of fact I think it shuck him up because he knew the kid as a good patient but had some problems with delayed gratification along with appearance etc, later on he told me dad I now see what you were saying when you use to tell us how to dress and conduct ourselves in public. Whether we like it or not our record, our appearance an the way we conduct ourselves do matter and it ain’t no way around it, it would be the same if we lived in a all black nation, all black society.

    • January 22, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      AMEN!!

      • January 22, 2015 - Reply

        @paintgurl40

        Thank you Sister.

    • January 23, 2015 - Reply

      @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      … or for our eschewing dreadlocks.

  10. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    It seems one has to engage in respectability politics to get any traction in Hollywood.

  11. January 22, 2015 - Reply

    Weird statement I’d say because I find that people of other races are more accepting of our hair in its natural state more so than blacks themselves. All of the negativity and stereotypes in regards to natural hair I’ve always heard from blacks, never any other races. I guess this is another classic case.

  12. January 23, 2015 - Reply

    I think all Black people, especially so called celebrities, should stop giving interviews, particularly to white people.

  13. January 23, 2015 - Reply

    Mackie’s logic is the same one rape apologists use when they say if women stop wearing certain clothing, there will be no rape.

  14. January 23, 2015 - Reply

    white people wear dreadlocks, corn rows, and Mohawk haircuts. white people also wear hoodies, white tee shirts, baseball caps, bandanas and pants well below their waistline. and, white people wear afro’s. rap music is all over the universe. everybody everywhere knows denzel Washington. the world is very familiar with spike lee and his movies. pretense and denial are not good – both distort reality.

  15. January 23, 2015 - Reply

    What he says makes sense. Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner and (insert black male) were racially profiled and murdered because they had locs….
    #NegroSitYoAssDown

    • January 23, 2015 - Reply

      @Ms. Vee

      That comment made my day. Preach Sister.

    • January 23, 2015 - Reply

      @Ms. Vee

      lol

  16. January 23, 2015 - Reply

    Now he’s back tracking and saying the interviewer edited his statements. This is not a good look for him.

  17. January 24, 2015 - Reply

    If a hair style can you killed, the hair style will be a black hair style.

  18. January 24, 2015 - Reply

    Will someone please tell me where did he lie!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • January 28, 2015 - Reply

      @TheBurningBush

      The lie is you can act, walk, talk with self respect and be respected this is BULL!

      • January 28, 2015 - Reply

        @GeekMommaRants

        true right on!

  19. January 24, 2015 - Reply

    See this why people bootleg your films Anthony.

  20. January 25, 2015 - Reply

    Mike Brown and Eric Garner did not have dreadlocks when they were killed. I don’t think they had hoodies on either. So I guess this actor thinks if black men walk around in a three piece suit and fresh haircut they will be safe from being profiled. Every person has a right to his/her opinion; and my opinion is that he sounds pompous.

  21. January 25, 2015 - Reply

    Black Must Be Preserved

    Are we truly a self-loving people
    Embracing our image with dignity and pride
    Or do we prefer the images of others
    Instead of the real and true Mc Coy.

    Our skin organ is a seat of emotion and information
    Adorned with scalp hair that helixes like DNA
    So when we only perm it, straighten, or weave
    It’s omnipotence is undermined

    In the universe dark matter/energy is omnipresent
    So black can’t be sinful, as some claim the Bible says?
    Or evil, wicked, worthy of condemnation and without morals
    As dictionaries of the world proclaim.

    Who started the process of black dehumanization anyway
    Thus compelling black youths to kill themselves
    Who made Black a crime on a sun dominant planet
    In a universe where Dark Matter is more than 90%

    Did God not know, that dark matter is dominant
    When black melanin she infused in prototype mankind
    Black as sin is a brutal hoax therefore
    To infect, disjoint and conquer black minds.

    Skin blackness equals black self-protection; remember
    From physical, psychological and mental warfare
    Its omniscient when fed with self-love
    So stop self-hate, from Bible lies.

    In dark wombs all mammals are created
    And in dark matter the Cosmos is upheld
    How could light obliterate darkness therefore
    When from dominant darkness; God said “let there be light!”

    Quiver in fear no more youthful black brothers
    With universal dark matter black melanin is aligned
    Love your skin, your hair and work to uplift each other
    Exchange guns, gangs and drugs, for Black On Black Love

    No more skin bleaching black people the world over
    You lose power to protect and heal when you do
    Black is right for us, as white is right for white people
    So emit black love and compassion to all of mankind.

  22. January 28, 2015 - Reply

    “Every black guy on that show who did something wrong has dreadlocks.” Is he for real? Plenty dudes on there without dreads. Black men are being targeted whether dreaded or bald. If the nephew wants to dread his hair he IS being his own individual. It’s his hair on HIS head. Uncle might’ve been exaggerating… more like he’s worried his nephew will be targeted more with dreads, which I dispute.

  23. February 20, 2015 - Reply

    Strongly disagree. Black dudes are profiled whether or not they have dreads. Most men I’ve seen on that show don’t have any. Thinking he’s just concerned his nephew will be profiled more with locs and while it’s good he’s looking out for him, his nephew is his own person. He’ll be just fine with dreads, sir.

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