Yesha Callahan

This Is How You Talk About Black Beauty As A White Outlet

African-Tribal-Makeup-Tutorials

Source: PopSugar

Many a mainstream media outlet has fallen prey to trying to claim long-standing Black fashion traditions as their trend of the season, but one medium you won’t see mentioned in that mix is PopSugar. Learning from the failings of its predecessors like Allure and Elle Canada, the fashion site decided transparency is the best policy when earlier this week it told its readers flat-out: don’t even think about trying to walk out the house in African tribal makeup just because we talked about it.

And the church of Black said Amen.

Brinton Parker gets the credit in this case for her feature: 9 Tribal Makeup Tutorials That Honor the Beauty of African Culture. Following a short intro paragraph shouting out the YouTube gurus responsible for these glorious tutorials, she warned:

Whether you want to adapt these traditional makeup methods for everyday wear (like this Instagrammer does so beautifully!) or simply need to perfect your face-painting skills for a celebration, let these gorgeous women teach you. And remember, it’s important to respect others’ backgrounds without erring on the side of cultural appropriation — if your heritage is not African, it’s possible to learn from and appreciate these culturally significant makeup looks without donning them yourself.

In other words: White girls, chill on running out to Sephora to get white paint pots and start dotting your face up before work. Now whether Parker and PopSugar really care about the concept of black beauty in the way we do and their anti-appropriating featurette is genuine is certainly up for debate. By by the lack of backlash received, we can deduce that the purpose plainly stated in their headline was achieved: honor. Take note sister sites.

Image Credits: PopSugar

  1. August 29, 2015 - Reply

    I’m here for this.

  2. August 29, 2015 - Reply

    The women look gorgeous.

  3. August 30, 2015 - Reply

    Can we retire words like ethnic, tribal tec… to describe any beauty ritual or fashion that’s non White/Western.

    • August 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Myllee

      I never thought about that but I agree. We all know if these were Euro based they would not be called ethnic.

      And I would add can we stop always filtering everything through White lens-I would have enjoyed learning about these great makeup tutorials without worrying how White woman see them. Clutch stays worrying about what White people and anti-BW trolls think.

    • August 31, 2015 - Reply

      @Myllee

      I agree. I think it’s lazy (and insensitive) writing on the part of the journalist. Instead of using some bullsh*t ambiguous term like “ethnic”, how about actually doing some research to find out which ethnicity or nationality the textile/pattern/print/style is inspired by?

    • September 2, 2015 - Reply

      @Myllee

      Thank you!

      • September 9, 2015 - Reply

        @mmmdot

        Sorry, but when Africans say tribe the meaning isn’t closer to the Western ethnic group, e.g. Yorubas are an ethnic group but Ijebu is a tribe of Yoruba.

        • September 12, 2015 - Reply

          @Sam

          Everyone: this is the colonized mindset [i.e. internalized white supremacy] in practice. It’s a mental illness caused by white supremacy.

          • September 12, 2015 - Reply

            @mmmdot

            LOL I was waiting for the idiot who was going to say this. The only problem is your reply doesn’t make sense. You make a mistake, get corrected then go on to claim internalized white supremacy? You need a shrink, your train of thought is abnormal.

            • September 18, 2015 - Reply

              @Sam

              Yawn! Go die in a fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

              • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                @mmmdot

                You’ve said this before. If it failed to make impact the first time what made you think it would.

                • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                  @Sam

                  Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

              • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                @mmmdot

                What made you think it would the second time?

                • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                  @Sam

                  Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

        • September 12, 2015 - Reply

          @Sam

          Nope. When Africans use the word tribe in general conversation, they do NOT mean same moronic racist 19th century ‘scientific’ theories as when white ‘Westerners’ say it. And I’m NOT doing your homework for you.Google it and leave me alone.

          • September 12, 2015 - Reply

            @mmmdot

            I know what I mean when I say tribe, and what my fellow Africans mean when they say tribe. You may want to do your homework.

            • September 18, 2015 - Reply

              @Sam

              Yawn! Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

              • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                @mmmdot

                Resorting to violence now? I can’t say I’m surprised. I don’t love any white trash, there weren’t any in the majority black country I grew up in.

                • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                  @Sam

                  Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much…

              • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                @mmmdot

                You’ve got your index finger stuck on the button.

          • September 12, 2015 - Reply

            @mmmdot

            But go on, keep telling Africans what they mean. We’d love to hear that we really don’t know what we’re talking about and that what we think we mean is not what we mean. And we should google what we say? Rich. Just rich. After all, it’s not the first time black Westerners have tried to impose their views on us.

            • September 18, 2015 - Reply

              @Sam

              YAWN! “No person is devoid of an attachment to some cultural fountain. Whose water are we drinking.” – Professor Molefi Kete Asante, Temple University

              • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                @mmmdot

                Europeanized African? You’d have a point if I was born or bred in Europe but unfortunately I wasn’t.

                • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                  @Sam

                  Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

    • September 8, 2015 - Reply

      @Myllee

      Aren’t traditionally Eastern European looks also called ethnic sometimes?

      • September 8, 2015 - Reply

        @PetulantPeacock

        Eastern Europeans are usually seen as a different kind/ lower grade of White lol

        • September 10, 2015 - Reply

          @Myllee

          That’s true.

  4. August 30, 2015 - Reply

    I actually read about this over at jezebel, where the article was saying that maybe a black person would have been more knowledgeable at featuring these women. Now the author never specified whether she meant black as in African-American or black as in any peoples of African descent. In the comments section however, there were many commenters that disagreed on the basis that because there is no ‘African’ culture, black americans have no more right to claim that heritage than any other peoples. And that for a black american to do a feature on ‘African’ ‘tribal’ makeup or marks, would be just as appropriative for a white person to do so. Now many of these commenters were white and basically whining like, if a black American can do it then why can’t I, but I ignored those. I did find interesting those that were from various countries in Africa, who were presenting legit criticism. I find these interesting, because I do, as a black american, I am proud of my African roots and heritage and wish to foster more connectivity between blacks across the diaspora. However I wish to do this without while respecting the diverse cultures that are within the diaspora.

    • August 30, 2015 - Reply

      @Mico

      I understand. We are black Americans. We don’t want to have a superiority complex as viewing ourselves as superior to other human beings of black African descent. Likewise, there is nothing wrong with any black person of the Diaspora to appreciate their African roots. For example, back during the 1960’s and during the 1970’s, tons of black people wore dashikis and other forms of African clothing. Many of them learned Swahili. That was great. We should definitely research more about African culture and show respect for those who live in Africa. Yet, this doesn’t mean that we should be restricted in not showing African clothing. Our ancestors came from Africa. No one is going to tell me that I shouldn’t wear African clothing. So, we can both respect African culture and understand that we can appreciate the African Diaspora too. We should foster more unity with the many cultures of the Diaspora progressively and respectfully. African culture is diverse mong different nations. Also, you have every right to claim your black African heritage. 🙂 Don’t let anyone prevent you from claiming your Blackness and your Africaness. You are black and beautiful. 🙂

      • August 30, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        Lol. I already know about and am very proud of both my africanness and my blackness (which to me are one in the same). I attended one of the first african centered schools in my city and got a chance to travel across the US to see many other african centered schools. I used to rock my gele both in school and in other places growing up. And would wear african garb, mostly from ghana, to various school functions and other functions around my city. When I was younger I learned Kiswahili and wish I had been able to continue learning, but we used to use swahili to greet and address our teachers and classmates. It was only into my 20s that I’ve really been able to see some of the divisions that white supremacy has caused between black peoples across the diaspora. Although I knew about anti-african sayings and thoughts by black americans etc, I don’t think I really was aware of the ways that some blacks across the diaspora thought about us. So I agree with you. Nobody is going to stop me from wearing my geles and other african garb, dancing and learning about west african dance styles, and learning how to cook various foods. Just as nobody can’t stop me from celebrating and reveling in my cultures and history within black america. I do believe that we have to come from a place of respect, honor, and constantly educating ourselves when we attempt to participate in ‘african’ culture.

        • August 30, 2015 - Reply

          @Mico

          Sorry that was so long but hope you have a better one lol

          • August 30, 2015 - Reply

            @Mico

            LOL. You are so funny and Bless You.

        • August 30, 2015 - Reply

          @Mico

          You’re right Sister.

          In life, respect is very important. The black people worldwide are our Brothers and our Sisters. So, when we travel into another location where there is a great number of people of the African Diaspora, we can show humility, respect, and honor. That is so great of you to attend African centered schools in your city. That’s a blessing. I was educated in a mostly African American elementary school and I was fortunate enough to learn about African history and culture back then. Every time that I learn about African history, African cultures, and the beauty of blackness, the more strong I feel in my mind and in my soul. We are here on this Earth for a temporarily period of time. While we’re here, we love our family, care for our neighbors, and honor the sacrifice and courage of those who can before us. It’s a fact that the system of white supremacy has used tactics in trying to divide black people in many nations. Evil people always want to promote negativity and negative energy. That is why we should show the truth in a gracious, soul enriching fashion. In that way, we not only benefit ourselves, but we can help others realize the dignity and the human value that they possess. Historically, African Americans collaborated with Africans in the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. We (as black Americans) worked with Africans in promoting anti-colonial movements. Dr. King and Malcolm X love Africa. We love Africa greatly. I know that you will celebrate African culture. Thank you for your words. You are filled with great wisdom Sister.

          • August 30, 2015 - Reply

            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

            Thank you and thank you as usual for dropping some knowledge. I know about the collaborations that black peoples have made across the diaspora for our freedom. I can’t remember what some activists are calling the period that we are in now, but today is our era’s civil rights movement. I just smh when I hear too many blacks across the diaspora spout white supremist rhetoric about each other. Especially when it comes to those who are in positions to create international bonds. But then when I hear about how many people are waking up and fighting and trying to build up and uplift blackness, all I can do is smile and have hope for our freedom.

            • August 30, 2015 - Reply

              @Mico

              You’re Welcome Sister.

              Some activists have called this generation’s civil rights movement among many names. Some call it the Joshua Generation. Some called it Black Lives Matter movement and other names. During this time, we deal with the prison industrial complex, with fighting misogynoir, and adhering with the sacrosanct principle of black liberation. We are living history now with the events of Ferguson, New York City, and in other locations nationwide. It is disappointing for that rhetoric to be spewed. Forming international collaborations and unity is definitely a necessity in our time. Malcolm X, Marcus Garvey, and others of our people advocated pan-African unity. Hope is a wonderful thing. I do see many black people waking up and fighting back against oppression. We love our blackness and we want the best for our people. Love is always superior to hate. Love has nothing to do with condoning injustice. Love is about using an active force of goodwill, so injustice is replaced with justice.

      • September 9, 2015 - Reply

        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

        Why does everyone think Swahili when they think of African languages? We may be mostly dark brown, but it doesn’t mean we’re the same.

        • September 9, 2015 - Reply

          @Sam

          Swahili is an African language (which was used by many in the Black Power movement during the 1960’s), but other great African languages include Xhosa, Bantu relates languages, etc. We should respect all African languages. All black people of black African descent are one people. We are one and I believe in pan Afrixan unity. There is diversity in my family, but I have one family. There is diversity in African Americans, Afro-Brazilians, etc but we are in one family as black people. We are one.

          • September 9, 2015 - Reply

            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

            Xhosa is a Bantu language, i.e. spoken by Bantu peoples. And no, saying all black people are the same is to ignore the cultural and ethnic diversity among Africans. We’re not all the same because most of us are dark brown. If you want true unity, why not include non-Africans?

            • September 9, 2015 - Reply

              @Sam

              I never said that all black people are the same ideologically or culturally. I did mention that all black people are one as in part of one family and as part of the same black African identity. That’s a fact. I do know that Xhosa is a Bantu language. Also, as you know Swahili has been spoken by millions of black Africans. I never ignored the cultural diversity among Africans as I have written before that there are diverse cultures and ethnicities of Africans. We all have black African ancestry and we are all of black African descent. There is nothing wrong with pan-African unity at all. I won’t back down.

              • September 9, 2015 - Reply

                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                You know that one of the earliest proponents of Pan-Africanism (a recent concept) was Muammar Gaddafi? A man of Arab ancestry. Swahili is spoken by millions of Africans who are Swahili. African-Americans are of West African descent, why not learn Hausa or Fulani? Like I said, that we share the same skin colour does not mean we’re all the same. There are the Bantus of Central Africa, the Afro-Asiatics to the East, the indigenous KhoiKhoi and the various pygmies. Not to mention the dark skinned Asians and Pacific Islanders. The only thing that connects these people is skin colour just like the only thing that connects Basques and other West Europeans is skin colour.

                • September 9, 2015 - Reply

                  @Sam

                  Now, here is my response. I knew you would respond in that fashion. First, Gaddafi was not one of the earliest proponents of Pan-Africanism. Pan-Africanism has been advanced by many people like Marcus Garvey, Kwame Nkrumah, and other black people as early as the 19th century. Not to mention that we both agree that Swahili was spoken by millions of black Africans, but Gaddafi is a person of Berber ancestry too. I never said that all Africans were the same culturally. I do say that African Americans and Africans are part of one black African people. African Americans mostly are have black West African descent and some African Americans are descended from other parts of Africa too. Also, many black Americans are learning about the Hausa, Fulani, and other languages beyond just Swahili. Also, DNA connects African Americans, Afro-Brazilians, etc. as having black African descent. That refutes the claim made by some that African Americans should only speak a limited amount of African languages. There is more than skin color connect black Americans to Africans. There is history, DNA, and other aspects of humanity.

                  Black is Beautiful
                  Pan African unity is beautiful too.

                  • September 9, 2015 - Reply

                    @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                    Gaddafi is Bedouin not Berber. And Swahili is spoken by people who belong to the Swahili ethnic group. Or people who have to work in areas where it is spoken. Millions of people in Africa speak French, learn that. It’s probably more familiar to many more millions of Africans than Swahili is. He was the one (among many) who championed the cause in Africa. I keep telling you that there is no one ‘black African people.’ African unity exists in the same way European unity exists. In form of the A.U. and the E.U.

                    • September 10, 2015 - Reply

                      @Sam

                      I will stick by my core convictions. You claimed that Pan-Africanism was a recent invention when it was not (as pan-Africanism has been promoted since the 19th century with people like Henry Sylvester Williams). Also, Gaddafi is an Arabized Berber as documented by many sources. Gaddafi has celebrated the Bedouin lifestyle. His family came from a small, relatively un-influential tribal group called the Qadhadhfa, who were Arabized Berber in heritage. Swahili is spoken by people from all over the world not just by the Swahili ethnic group. Also, people have the right to speak whatever language that he or she wants to. You have no right to restrict which language that a person wants to speak. Speaking many languages is part of the freedom of speech. Millions of Africans learn and speak French. I have written and spoke French in my life. I have no problem with Gaddafi championing the cause of Africans. I keep telling you that there is nothing wrong with pan-African unity and there is nothing wrong with Black Unity also. There is such a thing as the African Diaspora and Black African peoples. African unity exists beyond entities like the A.U. and the E.U. Pan-African unity deals with the collaboration between African Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, Afro-French, Afro-British, Afro-Brazilians, Afro-Colombians, Black Africans, etc.

                      #Black Lives Matter.

                      • September 11, 2015 - Reply

                        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                        I’m sorry, but 19th century is recent when considering human history. No, Gaddafi was Arab not Arabized Berber. I’m not telling you to not speak Swahili only that it is not West African. Don’t deceive yourself with black unity because it doesn’t exist. At least not in tribalistic Africa. Keep telling me about African unity when I as an African have witnessed ethnic discrimination. Tell the victims of xenophobia in South Africa about that, or the Somalis in Kenya. They’d love to hear about all those institutions and organizations.

                  • September 9, 2015 - Reply

                    @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                    All humans have African origin.

              • September 9, 2015 - Reply

                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                I should also add that it is racist to assume that every white person is a supremacist or a bigot. It’s equally racist to ignore that the world does not only include “blacks” and “whites”.

                • September 9, 2015 - Reply

                  @Sam

                  I also would add that I never never mentioned that all non Africans were racists.

                  • September 9, 2015 - Reply

                    @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                    Yes, tell a black person his life matters. Do you think my problems as an African are the same you face as a black American? My fight is different from yours although I appreciate your help.

                    • September 10, 2015 - Reply

                      @Sam

                      Black Lives will always matter. My problems as a black Americans are similar to your problems as an African. We both have to deal with the system of white supremacy, economic inequality, corporate corruption, gender inequality, xenophobia, and other real issues. We don’t have identical experiences, but we face the same system of racism and oppression. That’s a fact. We are in the same fight for liberation.

                      #Black Lives Matter.

                      • September 11, 2015 - Reply

                        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                        LOL! I don’t have issues with white supremacy because my country is 99% black, I don’t face racism or oppression because again my country is majority black, and I’m a member of three of the largest ethnic groups, I’m not South African so the apartheid is just like the holocaust for me. Like I said, we have almost nothing (except that which the world share) in common. Spare me your rubbish, please.

                        • September 11, 2015 - Reply

                          @Sam

                          This is my last response to you.

                          Just because a nation is majority black population doesn’t mean that racism and oppression is gone in that nation. So, your views are silly and wrong. South Africa is mostly black, but black university students have complained about them experiencing racism in the South African university called Stellenbosch University. I have answered all of your points. Now, you are sensitive and call my words “rubbish” which is an ab hominem attack. You use that attack since your don’t have any evidence to refute all of my points. Oppression is global. Also, the racism found in Stellenbosch University is an example of white supremacy against innocent black students. Apartheid like the Holocaust are notorious evils. Also, there is nothing wrong with black unity. You talk about xenophobia, but xenophobia is not only found in Africa. It is found in Europe (with a mostly white population) and in America. Also, Gaddafi is a member of an Arabized Berber tribe as documented by many sources like by A. J. Deus and other scholars. So, your words on black unity is a sign on why I will never agree with your agenda. People have the right to fight for Black Unity (as advocated by Malcolm X ad so many great leaders) and Pan-African Unity in the world.

                          #Black Unity
                          #Black Lives Matter.

                          • September 11, 2015 - Reply

                            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                            I never said xenophobia existed only in Africa, Lord knows where you got that. The only racism in my country is black against black and non-black people. South Africa is one country out of 54, that you expect its history to be the same as that of the rest is idiotic. One university is hardly representative of an entire country. You answered nothing, you just kept saying the same thing over and over again. You brought up South Africa to deal with my question on black racism, then called my views silly and wrong. I could claim AD hominem attack, but I won’t. They are not my views, they are my experiences as a black person in a black country ruled by black people. When my family was forced from its home, the oppressors were not white, they were black. Teach them of this wonderful unity. I’ve got no agenda: I’m realistic.

                          • September 11, 2015 - Reply

                            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                            Keep on misinterpreting what I say. Continue on with it.

                          • September 12, 2015 - Reply

                            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                            ad ho·mi·nem
                            ˌad ˈhämənəm/
                            adverb & adjective
                            1.
                            (of an argument or reaction) directed against a person rather than the position they are maintaining.
                            “vicious ad hominem attacks”
                            You might want to keep a dictionary handy next time. I’m against your position not your person, but by labeling my experiences as silly and wrong you’re attacking me. That’s ad hominem. It may surprise you, but not everywhere is the U.S. and not everywhere wishes to be. You’ll just have to take your fetish for white on black oppression elsewhere because it doesn’t exist in a lot of countries.

                  • September 11, 2015 - Reply

                    @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                    Are you sure this person is ACTUALLY an African and not a pedantic white troll?

                    • September 11, 2015 - Reply

                      @mmmdot

                      I wouldn’t be surprised if this person is a white troll. My intuition tells me that this person is either a self hater or a white troll. His words are exactly the same ideologically as a right wing extremist who abhors black unity. I’m glad that you’re here Sister in dropping the truth like usual.

                      • September 12, 2015 - Reply

                        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                        Pretty much. And thank YOU for everything you’ve said.

                        I have to look for the info but I’m sure that I read somewhere that I read that somewhere that Swahili an indigenous African Bantu language from people who migrated from West Africa to Eastern Africa. I’ll have to look it up but it irritates the hell out of me b/c I constantly hear white academic racists (and their acolytes) bring it up like cultural continuity AND diversity can’t exist on the African continent at the same time. It just seems like such a stupid white person thing to bring up and fixate on…

                      • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                        Dr. Leonard Jeffries, Jr.: Over the past few decades new discoveries and scientific finds in Africa have destroyed many of the old myths and stereotypes about the so-called “Dark Continent.” This new material has helped to clarify the historical record and establish some new truths. Myths, misconceptions and misunderstandings are continually being swept away. It is clear that Africa, far from being the continent of darkness, was a extraordinary and unique source of “Light” for human development and civilization. As more and more scientific evidence emerges, Africa takes its place historically at the head of the Human Family.

                        African is a vast continent. It is second only to Asia in size. Traditionally it has been divided into large geographical regions and studies have focused on its diversity and distinctiveness. As we learn more about Africa and its peoples, it is obvious that there are two major themes which will help us understand the diverse continent. One is that Africa is not jungle; it has a diverse geographical mixture of climatic zones with different ecologies and environments. In the North and South there are temperate zones. The dominant feature of these regions, however, are the deserts, particularly the Sahara which affects the northern part of the continent from the Red Sea in the East to the Atlantic Ocean in the West. In the central and eastern regions are the Great Lakes and mountainous zones, featuring Mount Kenya and famous Kilimanjaro and the Ethiopian Highlands. The vast majority of the continent in the East, the West and the South is Savannah or grasslands that have facilitated the migration and movement of peoples and animals. The rain forest or jungle covers less than 10% of the continent and is concentrated in the great watershed of the Congo River basin in the heart of Africa and along the West Coast.

                        The other theme centers around the cultural unity of Africa and its peoples. This subject is very important because the ethnic uniqueness of the various African groups often hides the cultural unity throughout the different regions of the continent. To better understand the many ethnic groups in Africa, it is helpful to look at the common functions of the most important institutions and similar practices of the folkways and custom. To more fully appreciate the uniqueness of the different African peoples, it is necessary to look at the value systems and the institutions that perpetuate these values. As a result, a more productive approach to understanding Africa and her peoples is to see the cultural unity within ethnic diversity. AFRICAN UNITY AND DIVERSITY.

                        African Ethnic Groups

                        Africa has many ethnic groups and distinct societies. Some are large populations, representing millions of people; others are small, representing thousands. Some have highly structured kingdoms with kings and chiefs and councils. Others have independent clan structures. Some are world famous for their art work and sculpture as well as weaving techniques. Some are unified culturally with sister groups and have developed high levels of civilization, such as the Akan, the Yoruba, the Mande, the Swahili, the Amharic and the Hausa-Fulani. Some are famous as cattle herders and warriors such as the Zulus, Masai and Kikuyu.

                        African Languages

                        It is generally accepted that African has over one thousand languages among its various people. Most of these local languages, however, can be grouped into major African language families. The principle of unity and diversity is applicable in the language area just as it is applicable in climate, geology, food production, culture and physical type.

                        Four language family classifications are:

                        Afro-Asiatic
                        Nilo-Saharan
                        Niger-Kordofanian
                        Khoisan

                        • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                          @mmmdot

                          Thank you for the information Sister.

                      • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                        “This book deals in some detail with the migration throughout West Africa only. This is not to underestimate and/or neglect the dispersion of Egyptians and/or Egypt model society, to east, central and southern Africa. Such dispersion was caused by foreign invasions and the Islamic onslaughts on Western Africa in the 11th century. Substantial archeological evidence shows that there was a significant population growth between 750 and 1110 C E [i.e. AD], accompanied by the emergence of a dozen or so stable and distinct regional traditions, which flourished in central and eastern Africa. These new societies had the same features of the ancient Egyptian model government, beliefs, and building technologies. The dispersion to central and southern Africa in the 11th century, began from near the Upper Bennu River, to the Congo and Southern Africa. Academia and records tell us that this was the largest migration in Africa’s history. These people, who are called Bantu, created states that emerged in Africa’s interior without any reference to events at the coast.” — Moustafa Gadalla, “Exiled Egyptians: The Heart of Africa

                        • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                          @mmmdot

                          That’s a very interesting source. I have looked at Amazon to look at the cover of the book. The book is very interesting. You know your stuff Sister.

                          • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                            @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                            No, thank YOU, lol. Because of your conversation with this hateful troll, I had to reacquaint myself with some of the things I had read before about Swahili. Now I’ll be sure to always have them on hand for myself and others who are who are open to the truth, and the agents of white supremacy [like this troll] who want to question the legitimacy of Black solidarity.

                            • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                              @mmmdot

                              You’re Welcome. Black solidarity is real. It is a powerful force and we will never bow down to any hater. We will stand up, show the truth,and believe in wisdom. We want justice. We abhor the system of racism/white supremacy. Consciousness and black solidarity are beautiful aspects of humanity.

                              • September 19, 2015

                                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                                Here’s another good source: “And lastly, just remember that when you see the Ashantis, the Yorubas, and all the other African people, they were not always where they are now. Arab and European slavery made the African migrate from one part of the African world to the other; that is why you can see in Akan culture as written by the African writer Dr. J. B. Danquah, the people with the same hair-cut, and the same beads and jewelry system as Queen Nefertari (the wife of Pharaoh Rameses II in the Nineteenth Dynasty), and Queen Nefertiti (the wife of Pharaoh Akhnaton in the Eighteen Dynasty). It is too much to speak about it, really.” – Yosef ben-Jochannan, “Nile Valley Civilization and the Spread of African Culture”

                              • September 19, 2015

                                @mmmdot

                                Thank you for that source Queen. 🙂

                              • September 19, 2015

                                @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                                You’re very welcome! ;- )

                              • September 19, 2015

                                @mmmdot

                                You’re such a Sweetpeach. 😉 The struggle continues and we will fight on. Our ancestors were strong people and we will be strong for our ancestors and for our descendants.

                      • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                        “Afrocentricity is not a theory just for the African diaspora. In fact, Afrocentricity is fundamentally rooted on the continent of Africa where it has its largest following. Furthermore, Swahili was not been proposed as a Diasporan African language but as a language to unite Africans. It is a very logical choice and the l977 FESTAC colloquium held in Lagos, Nigeria, concluded that it would make an excellent choice for the international African world since it was least attached to a large ethnic group such as Yoruba or Hausa. At any rate, no African slaves were brought to the Americas, only African people were brought here.” – Dr. Molefi Kete Asante, “A Quick Reading of Rhetorical Jingoism: Anthony Appiah and his Fallacies”

                      • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                        @truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

                        “The Niger River system flows more than two thousand miles through West Africa from the highlands of the Republic of Guinea to Mali, Niger, Benin and finally empties into the Atlantic Ocean along the Nigerian Coast. The river actually splits the Republic of Nigeria, one of Africa’s most important nations, into two halves and is the source of its name. During the Medieval Period from 1,000 A.D. to 1,600 A.D., the Niger River Valley was the center of African Islamic Civilization that produced the great Empires of Ghana, Mali and Songhay which were famous for their gold trade across the Sahara with the Mediterranean world. This Sudanic Civilization with its mixture of traditional African cultural systems and Islam was based on agricultural development combined with extensive commercial activity in several city-states, such as Kumbi-Kumbi, Gao, Mopti, Djene, Kano, Sokota, Zaire and Timbuctoo which was famous for its trading and its University of Sankore. Several Arab scholars visited these empires and wrote about their prosperity, the peace and safety throughout the land and the fairness of their systems of justice and administration. The Empire of Ghana, Mali, and Songhay rose to prominence during the period of the Middle Ages when Europe was suffering from the chaos and confusion of the Crusades, feudal wars and the Dark Ages.

                        The Congo River system is one of the World’s greatest watersheds and rivals the Amazon River Valley. It is the center of the great rain forest or so-called jungle that is located in Central Africa. During the slave trading era the Africans of the Congo River Valley and adjacent areas were the victims of a double attack by slave raiders. They were initially victimized by the Arabs raiding from the North and East and later by the Europeans raiding from the West and South. These events triggered continuous warfare among Africans. On the international scale they triggered conflicts and wars among Europeans. This period represents a very sad chapter in African and World history.” – Dr. Leonard Jeffries, Jr., “The African Americans Search for Truth and Knowledge”

                        • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                          @mmmdot

                          Excellent source. Keep them coming Sister. 🙂

                • September 11, 2015 - Reply

                  @Sam

                  Lol! Everyone: this is the colonized mindset [i.e. internalized white supremacy] in practice. It’s a mental illness caused by white supremacy. This is why it’s important to teach your kids something other than faulty (Aristotelian) disjunctive “logic” and dichotomous (Manichean) “reasoning” – they end up being incapable of producing anything approaching a comprehensive, intelligent thought. Their tactics and speech resemble the mentally incompetent whites with fragmented, limited reasoning skills that we ALREADY deal with all day, everyday. Unless they ever choose to decolonize their minds, talking to these dumb fucks is LITERALLY like talking to a racist white troll in a (supposedly) Black body.

                  • September 12, 2015 - Reply

                    @mmmdot

                    Oh look another black supremacist. As disgusting and vile as the rest of them. You ought to rot and burn with your nearest cousins – the KKK. Troll someone else, I don’t have time for racist fucks like you.

                    • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                      @Sam

                      Oh really? When did Black people EVER stop whites from doing anything they had a RIGHT to do, like vote, live wherever they wanted to, HAVE CHILDREN, etc? When do Black people ever gather to publicly and systematically burn whites alive at the stake while cutting off their body parts for SOUVENIRS? Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

                      • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                        @mmmdot

                        When? Every time you and your like meet. We get it, you love white trash. It’s OK, no one gives a fuck.

                        • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                          @Sam

                          Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much..

                        • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                          @Sam

                          Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

                          • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                            @mmmdot

                            You should remove your hand from the keyboard lest you break it. Have some tea, it’ll calm you down.

                            • September 18, 2015 - Reply

                              @Sam

                              Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

                              • September 18, 2015

                                @mmmdot
                              • September 18, 2015

                                @Sam

                                Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

                              • September 18, 2015

                                @mmmdot

                                I don’t have time for lunatics, I really don’t.

                              • September 19, 2015

                                @Sam

                                Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

                              • October 13, 2015

                                @mmmdot

                                It’s nice to know criticism and dissenting opinions cannot be tolerated.

                              • October 14, 2015

                                @Sam

                                Fuck you, WORTHLESS piece of shit. Go die in a goddamned fire with the violent racist white trash you LOVE so much.

    • August 31, 2015 - Reply

      @Mico

      Yeah i’ve heard both arguments from African people. They either aren’t okay with it or encourage AA’s to stop claiming American over their true roots ect. it would be an interesting debate to hear between Africans I think.

      • August 31, 2015 - Reply

        @Anonin

        True. I’m on the fence with this one. I’ve seen and met AA take on random African names from different tribes of different countries and when I point out their gross error, they just reply that it’s all African so shouldn’t matter. Then why do we call out white folk who do similar ignorant things? The Japanese coutourier that made the same error with African clothing.

        It’s good to try to know that part of your heritage but at least KNOW that Africa isn’t a country so we don’t all dress, eat, speak or look alike though we share similar values. It would’ve been better if they put the tribes they were representing for their readers but kudos to them still.

        • August 31, 2015 - Reply

          @AfroCapricornette

          Yes. With my background and education, I’ve always noted the culteral differences between countries and tribes. However, I used to pay more attention to the similarities between cultures and not so much the differences. Some black americans choose to remain ignorant and attempt to lump all of Africa together. But I think there are also those who perhaps don’t know which specific tribe or regions they came from and choose to celebrate all of them together. Which is why I am grateful for the dna testing that can be done to see which countries and which groups our people came from.

          • August 31, 2015 - Reply

            @Mico

            It’s great that you know the differences but there are little similarities between tribes except they’re from the same region or are endemic to >1 country. Not many AA know about tribes/cultures and the ones I’ve met that do actually live on the continent and are well educated and travelled, like you. Nevertheless, it’s very comical (to us) to see AA mash up different tribal names/clothing from different countries not even knowing which tribes they’re representing or just straight up mis-representing a tribe. Again, research can be done. After all, if a non-African should do it, we’d be screaming blue murder.

            • September 1, 2015 - Reply

              @AfroCapricornette

              All this is true lol.

      • August 31, 2015 - Reply

        @Anonin

        I agree with you. There should be a larger discussion both between African peoples and then broadened to peoples of African descent.

    • August 31, 2015 - Reply

      @Mico

      Honestly, as a Black American I’ve made the same argument.

    • September 12, 2015 - Reply

      @Mico

      As Dr. Marimba Ani says: “You’re not an African because you’re born in Africa. You’re an African because Africa is born in you. It’s in your genes…your DNA…Your entire biological make up. Whether you like it or not that’s the way it is; that’s the way it is. However, if you embrace this truth with open arms…my, my, my, what a wonderful thing”

  5. September 2, 2015 - Reply

    I like what they have to say about cultural appropriation, but “tribe” is a white supremacist term in reference to Africans. I DO love that gorgeous makeup, tho. Black is beautiful!

  6. September 9, 2015 - Reply

    Because all Africans wore tribal marks. Thank you for defeating your own argument.

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